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Information provided on this site is meant to complement and not replace any advice or information from a health professional.
The intended mission of the site is to help people dealing with total knee replacements and other physicalities realize they are not alone.

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Proudly Announcing….

Hi everyone. I am honored and humbled to announce that for the third consecutive year, this blog has been voted One of The Best Total Knee Replacement Blogs 2015 by Healthline.com. It is only due to the support of you and the other 331,000+ readers that this is possible.
Thank you from the bottom of my heart. Marie (aka Booktoots)

Kindly click on the link below to be taken to Healthline’s site for more information about this prestigious list. If the link is not clickable, simply copy and paste it into your computer’s address field.


http://www.healthline.com/health-slideshow/best-total-knee-replacement-blogs

Find interesting? Please share with others…

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns. The site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 30+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.






How To Extend The Life Of A Swimsuit

Hi everyone! As many of you know, I am an avid supporter of swimming and water aerobics. It is the ideal way to get exercise without putting much pressure on the joints. Granted, it is not for those fresh out of a total knee replacement, or tkr. Down the road, however, it provides many benefits.

The cost of swimsuits can seem rather high. The more costlier, the longer the suit lasts. A quality, higher-priced suit can contain chlorine resistant components that extend the suit’s useful life. It can be made out of more durable materials. Whatever the reason, a good suit is worth the investment. There’s nothing like a good water workout, in my opinion.
Continue reading How To Extend The Life Of A Swimsuit

TKR Advice Update

Hi everyone. Thanks for stopping by my site. It’s that time again…

I completely understand the hardships and frustration of undergoing tkr recuperation.
However….

I am not a medical professional who dispenses advice. READ THE WAIVER OF LIABILITY IN THE LEFT SIDEBAR.

* I do not know how soon you can engage in weight bearing.

* I do not know if your condition warrants medical attention….etc…etc…

PLEASE DO NOT EXPECT ME TO DISPENSE MEDICAL ADVICE….IT IS NOT GOING TO HAPPEN. I only share my personal experiences. My readers also pitch in and share stories whenever possible. That is it.

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns. The site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 30+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.

Thank you for your patience and understanding.






How To Enjoy A Body Cast

Hi everyone. While recently talking with one of my friends about the benefits of having pets, something came to mind. It involves me and my cat Puffy and my days of living in a body cast (in technical terms it is known as a spica cast.) I was in a body cast due to having a fractured femur (thigh bone).

My entire upper body was encased in plaster. From directly below my breast line to my hip bones, my body was completely covered. The portion over my torso was totally flat. It was the perfect environment for holding my drinks, plate of food, and/or my cat Puffy.

Here’s the scoop…

Puffy was used to jumping up onto my stomach, getting a few friendly petting strokes, then settling in for a nap while I was laying down. He’d delightfully purr away while enjoying his sleep time. He would gently go along for the ride as my lungs filled up with air, then lowered as they emptied. He was very content. And, so was I. It was a relaxing sight.

Then, I was in a body cast. I was laying on the sofa when suddenly Puffy jumps up. He’s standing there, probably wondering “what the hey?”, then turns to take a look at me. I petted him. He just lowered himself into his typical sleeping position (where his front paws were gently placed underneath his chin). Then he started taking his nap. This became a regular habit throughout my body cast days.

Puffy enjoyed my body cast. It provided the perfect flat solution for a good few hours of restful sleep. So, the way to enjoy a body cast is by having a pet who enjoys it also. :)

Find interesting? Kindly share..Thanks!

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns. The site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 30+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.






How Long Do You Need To Exercise After Your TKR?

Hi my favorite readers! I’ve received quite a few emails recently about exercising after a tkr. It seems there is some concern about how long one needs to continue PT exercises following their total knee replacement. I believe sharing some first-hand information is useful…Here is a previously published article of mine:

Exercising is a part of my daily routine. I still do my tkr exercises and I’m 7 years post-surgery. The exercises may not be daily or on a scheduled basis. But, I still do them. I also enjoy doing isometrics throughout the day. There is no set time, place, or routine. I simply tighten various muscle groups and hold the tension for 6-8 seconds. Then I release and go on to the next muscle group. If you followed the same PT routine that I did, isometrics were the first tkr recuperation maneuvers we went through. It feels very good to do these maneuvers.

I have an exercise bike at home that I use whenever I feel like getting tortured. It’s particularly helpful when my tkr is stiffer than usual. Swimming is much more fun, but hey, you gotta do what you gotta do. Swimming doesn’t improve my tkr flexibility like an exercise bike does.

Luckily, there is a local YMCA nearby. I use that for swimming and water exercises (woohoo!) and the fitness machines. I dread those fitness machines. They’re just no fun. We always hear how one can change his or her attitude towards the positive and beneficial. Well…this is a perfect test case. As much as I look at these machines with disdain, they are improving my strength (or so I am convincing myself..).

A real-life story: Recently, one of my swimming buddies and I were discussing my dislike for fitness machines. She reassured me that I’ll eventually overcome that. She went on to regale the fact that she originally hated those machines. Now, she loves them. Hmmm…I’ll keep you posted.

Without any type of exercise, I would turn into a grumpy old lady in no time. I could easily join those aches and pains complaining sessions and start popping all kinds of pills. Instead, I choose physical activity. It’s only because I like to be charming as much as possible. :)

Hope this helps others going through the same thing.

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns. The site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 30+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through similar situations.

Find interesting? Kindly share…Thanks!






Do You Need Personalized TKR Help? View Update

Hi everyone! It has recently come to my attention that an increasing number of my valued readers are privately contacting me for personalized consultations. It is important for me to mention that even though I am flattered by the increased trust and confidence placed in me, I do not offer free advice.

As stated on my Services Page, I do provide fee-based consultations as an extension of my blog. This is the result of being asked by numerous people who requested such services. Find the specific details outlined on the page, located on the top portion of my home page.

Remember, I do not provide medical advice. To reiterate….I am not a medical professional. I only discuss what has happened to me and my unique situation.

Find interesting? Kindly share with others who may benefit. Thanks!

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns. The site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 30+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.






Is Your TKR Leg A Dead Weight?

Hi everyone! I have received quite a few comments lately about the worries of having a very stiff tkr leg for a time after the surgery. This is no news to us who found out the hard way that this is a common event. Here’s some more insight…

My entire leg was a complete dead weight. None of my muscles worked. My tkr knee needed gentle stretching exercises to increase the bend along the front part of my new knee. I needed to work on stretching out my hamstrings, along the backside of my knee, to straighten my leg. My leg would not lay flat on any surface.

Even though I was up and walking on a walker the day after my tkr, my muscles were still not developed enough to support my body weight. I remember sitting in a chair and not being able to slide my foot at all. I am certain everyone goes through this. This is when those assisted exercises come into play.

It has been seven years since my tkr and my leg still gets stiff and painful after prolonged periods of walking or standing. I just rest, elevate, and ice. It’s no big deal.

Hope it helps others going through the same thing. Remember, you are not alone in this endeavor. Take a look around this site for more insight from myself and readers.

Find interesting? Kindly share…Thanks!

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns. The site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 30+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.






How To Turn Car Washing into TKR Exercise

Washing your own car not only saves money, but can provide an all-body workout. Just try washing your own by hand and tell me it’s not a good cardio workout. :) And, there are ways to improvise to get more tkr (total knee replacement) exercise. Try these…

While stretching and reaching to wash the roof and hood area of your car, gently straighten your tkr leg. This helps stretch out your entire back and leg area.

While bending down to wash the lower parts of your car, gently straighten your knee until you feel a mild stretch along the backside of your knee. There, you’re stretching your hamstrings without doing much different.

While cleaning the inside of your car, gently bend your good knee and place it on your seat. Keep your tkr knee straight and start cleaning your car’s interior…wiping down the dash, console area, door rests, etc. The farther you stretch, the more the backside of your leg, arms and back will stretch. Just be certain you don’t stretch so far that you harm yourself. Common sense, but worth repeating.

Well, those are some ways I wanted to share about how to naturally stretch out your tkr leg. Remember, though, these maneuvers may not be possible until you have enough flexibility and strength in your tkr leg. I, personally, couldn’t wash my car without excessive pain for a solid six months after my surgery. You may be different, since everyone varies.

Do you have any experiences you want to share in exercising your tkr leg?

Find interesting? Kindly share…







Boat Ramps & A TKR

Hi my favorite readers! Having recently returned from an interesting boating adventure, I thought it would be worthy to share some insightful information to help others. It involves floating boat ramps and tides. Please pardon any improper usage of nautical terms and oversimplification of this complex topic. I’m still trying to figure out this entire area. It’s totally foreign to me. I’ll give it my best…

Anyways, I learned about tides and how they affect the angle of floating ramps. Ramps are the access point onto the docks. The lower the tide, the greater the angle of the ramp. The greater the angle, the steeper the ascent or descent. More pressure is put on the knees and legs. And, I must admit, on the mental stress level.

The ramps are attached to the docks. As I previously mentioned, for this story, I’m talking about floating boat docks. These docks are affected by changing tides. Floating boat docks change heights as the tide changes. Dock components include the deck, frame, and floats. The deck is the portion you walk on. The frame supplies the structural support. The floats provide the buoyancy factor needed to keep you dry. That’s very simplified, yet helpful.

Now…let’s imagine the angle of ascent or descent due to tide changes. Picture a clock with hands on the 12 and 6. This will provide a straight vertical line, known in angle terms as 90 degrees. Halfway between this point – on the right side – will be 3. Move the lower portion of the line from 6 to 3 and you get a 45 degree. A 45-degree angle provides a perfect walking atmosphere. No stress, elevation or decline. Just ease.

Next…take that 45 degree hand and move it closer to the 90 degree line. There will be angles ranging from 46 to 89. Depending upon the tide, that is amount of descent or ascent you will experience while walking the ramp.

To put this into a real-life perspective, our trip involved a negative tide of -2. I don’t understand how that ties into ramp angles in technical terms…but I sure do know how it worked in real-life. YIKES!!!!!!!!!!! It’s a good thing there were sturdy rails. That’s all I’ve got to say. That angle would make the perfect slide scenario. Come to think of it…that would be fun!

My first exposure to floating docks was during high tide. It was a wonderful, yet interesting, ascent and descent to and from my final boat destination. Walking the ramp was no big deal. It was at about 50 degree angle. Nice. I thought it would always be like that. WRONG!!!!!!

For those tkr folk among us, I suggest walking backwards during low tide periods. It would give the hamstrings a great workout. There would be minimal stress on the knee and knee cap area. I wish I would have remembered that during my experience. So…now you know.

Hopefully this has helped others going through the same thing.

End of floating boat ramp saga..

Find interesting? Kindly share…Thanks!







Driving A Stick Shift After a TKR

Hi everyone! Something recently happened that I thought was worthy of sharing with others living with a tkr. It involves driving a manual transmission with a tkr in place. Driving a stick is fun, challenging, and keeps a driver in better control of a vehicle – when compared to an automatic transmission. However, what is it like to shift gears with a tkr leg? I had that chance…

I learned how to drive on a stick shift. I enjoyed the challenge and control. It gave me a far greater appreciation for the driving task and the marvels of an automobile. I loved it! There is far better control of the vehicle in conditions involving inclement weather…like snow, ice, heavy rains, etc. Driving a stick means the driver determines when the car shifts to the next level, not a computer chip or other device that the driver has no control over.

That was 40 years ago, though. What would it be like now that I have a tkr on my left leg, the leg used to engage the clutch pedal? Would I be able to drive the vehicle? Would I remember how to coordinate the clutch with the gear shift? It would be interesting.

At first, I was admittedly scared and very curious. I wasn’t sure whether my tkr leg would bend enough to handle the shifting. I envisioned blowing up an engine or gasket at the very least. My confidence was questionable. So…I took the car on a test run around the parking lot.

I engaged the clutch, put the car into first, put the key into the ignition, turned the ignition key, and slowly started moving. I maneuvered the car out of the parking space, made right and left hand turns, came to stop signs, applied the brakes, started moving, and made it back home. I even utilized reverse without hitting anything. I pulled into parking spaces without crashing into anything. IT WAS A BLAST!! Whew! I did this for two days before venturing out into the “real” world.

I was amazed about how the entire process of driving a stick was similar to riding a bike. No one had to tell me anything, it just came back to me. How nice…:)

As I started driving in traffic, I noticed that utilizing the clutch one stop light after another was becoming tiring. I never realized how much the leg is exercising while performing this maneuver. The process seemed to trigger the neuropathy left from my removed bone spurs. (I have written about the neuropathy in other posts…) In hindsight, that is probably one reason I was so tired the remaining day and night.

Still…I would do it again in a heart beat. I love the sound of gears shifting, motors revving up, and knowing I have that control. Long live manual transmissions!

Does anyone else have stories to share about driving a stick (manual transmission) after a tkr? We want to hear them!

Hope this helps others going through the same thing. Find interesting? Kindly share…Thanks!

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns. The site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 30+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.