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I’m not a medical pro, On whose advice you should heed, So please beware that, What works for me, May not suit your need. (aka Waiver of Liability)


Information provided on this site is meant to complement and not replace any advice or information from a health professional.
The intended mission of the site is to help people dealing with total knee replacements and other physicalities realize they are not alone.

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Thank You Booktoots’ Supporters…

Hi everyone. It’s that time again to say “thank you” for visiting and playing an active role in helping this site succeed. I appreciate all you do. Whether it is reading through the posts, commenting about your current situation, or encouraging other readers, thank you for taking time out of your day to participate.

Best of luck to everyone. Please share the news about this site with others you know could benefit. We are all in this together!
Find interesting? Kindly share…

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns. The site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 30+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.






How Do You Know When You’re Overdoing It?

Hi my favorite readers! I was just thinking about writing a post about how to tell when you are overdoing it, when a rescue team was called to the hot tub. It turns out a lady overheated while sitting in the tub. She didn’t realize she was overdoing it. I don’t know how it turned out, but hopefully she is home staying cool.

So..how do you know when you are overdoing it? When first recuperating from a total knee replacement, knee swelling and warmness are common symptoms. So is pain. So is pain. (The double entry is purposeful.)

I remember asking my physical therapist for an answer. She mentioned that if there was pain for more than two hours after exercise, it signified overdoing it. OK. More than one source confirms this two-hour period for being a gauge. So, I’ll buy that.

Now…how about the times not affecting a tkr, or total knee replacement? Like when one is sitting in a hot tub, wet or dry sauna, swimming or exercising in the gym? What about pregnant woman, those with diabetes, etc.? Hotter temperatures can easily lead to heat exhaustion or heat strokes without any physical exertion involved.

I had someone tell me to put a cold towel on my head while sitting in a sauna to withstand hot temperatures for longer periods of time. I can see how a cold head might help out. But, my question is…how can you tell when you’re overdoing it? If your head is cold, does that mean the rest of your body isn’t getting overheated? How can it? What if the nerves in someone’s cervical area, which send signals from your neck to your body are severed, or damaged, so proper transmission is hindered?

Anybody have an answer?

Anyways…overdoing can result from too much exercise, too much heat, too much food, too much anything..to be truthful. When doing research into overdoing it, I came up with a list of signals to look out for. This applies to the general population who do not have any predisposed conditions, like a fractured C-1.

Loss of appetite
Visual field impairment
Sleep disorders
Mood disorders like irritability..(yeah, I’ll blame it on that..:) )
Heart rate fluctuations like murmurs
Excessive fatigue
Incessant sweating or lack of any sweating
Shortness of breath, dizziness or breathing difficulties
Difficulties focusing and concentrating
Muscle cramps and spasms
Chest pains
Nausea and vomiting

It is imperative that you know your body so you can more easily notice when things aren’t feeling or going correctly. At least, that’s what I’m told.

Overdoing it is a foreign field to me, since I’ve had a fractured C-1. Personally, I don’t realize I’m overdoing it until I cannot function properly. That is why I keep track of my pulse, time spent engaged in activities and other external signals. Even those fail sometimes.

Whenever in doubt about any situation, I always place safety first. I would much rather be a “wimp” than someone in the emergency room.

Hope this helps others going through the same thing. Find interesting? Kindly share…..Thanks!

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns. The site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 30+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.








How Long Do You Need To Exercise After Your TKR?

Hi my favorite readers! I’ve received quite a few emails recently about exercising after a tkr. It seems there is some concern about how long one needs to continue PT exercises following their total knee replacement. I believe sharing some first-hand information is useful. Here is a previously published article which I have received numerous requests for:

Exercising is a part of my daily routine. I still do my tkr exercises and I’m 7 years post-surgery. The exercises may not be daily or on a scheduled basis. But, I still do them. I also enjoy doing isometrics throughout the day. There is no set time, place, or routine. I simply tighten various muscle groups and hold the tension for 6-8 seconds. Then I release and go on to the next muscle group. If you followed the same PT routine that I did, isometrics were the first tkr recuperation maneuvers we went through. It feels very good to do these maneuvers.

I have an exercise bike at home that I use whenever I feel like getting tortured. It’s particularly helpful when my tkr is stiffer than usual. Swimming is much more fun, but hey, you gotta do what you gotta do. Swimming doesn’t improve my tkr flexibility like an exercise bike does.

Luckily, there is a local YMCA nearby. I use that for swimming and water exercises (woohoo!) and the fitness machines. I dread those fitness machines. They’re just no fun. We always hear how one can change his or her attitude towards the positive and beneficial. Well…this is a perfect test case. As much as I look at these machines with disdain, they are improving my strength (or so I am convincing myself..).

A real-life story: Recently, one of my swimming buddies and I were discussing my dislike for fitness machines. She reassured me that I’ll eventually overcome that. She went on to regale the fact that she originally hated those machines. Now, she loves them. Hmmm…I’ll keep you posted.

Without any type of exercise, I would turn into a grumpy old lady in no time. I could easily join those aches and pains complaining sessions and start popping all kinds of pills. Instead, I choose physical activity. It’s only because I like to be charming as much as possible. :)

Hope this helps others going through the same thing.

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns. The site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 30+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through similar situations.

Find interesting? Kindly share…Thanks!






Happy Father’s Day

Hi everyone!

Wishing all the father’s among us a special day of celebration. All types of dads, whether of humans or animals, deserve extra special treatment today. Take some time to be spoiled, loved, and treasured. You deserve it! You touch lives in a manner that words cannot describe.

“A father is a boy’s first hero and a daughter’s first love.” I sure know mine is.

Enjoy!

Fathers Day 2

2014-Happy-Fathers-Day-Wallpapers-Sayings

Find interesting? Kindly share…Thanks!

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns. The site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 30+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.








Gratitude For Wearing a Shoe Lift

Hi everyone! Some may think that wearing a shoe lift is a hindrance. After all, not everyone wears one and the wearer could be on the receiving end of some strange looks. I know, I have worn one for 33 years. Part of my recuperation from my tkr includes adjusting my shoe lifts. So..that is why I have figured out reasons to be grateful for wearing them.

Puddles. Depending upon the thickness of one’s shoe lift, puddles can easily be walked through. Your shoe will not get wet, unlike your “regular” shoe. This statement applies to shallow streams, also.

Self defense. If someone starts to give the wearer a hard time, the shoe lift can be used to place a heavy kick to the groin. (That is if you can lift your leg that much. :)) The extra weight will make for an extra punch.

Toe stomping. Shoe lifts are perfect for this. If needed, it could be part of self defense.

Bug killing. The extra weight of a shoe lift can provide for an easy kill of bugs that are otherwise hard to kill (such as a cockroach….especially Palmetto bugs….ewww!!). All one needs to do is get a quick “whack!” in and the little critter will be saved a lingering death. Be sure to apologize to them before the killing process, though. They usually don’t mean any harm.

Gait. Of course, the best reason for wearing a shoe lift is the fact that it balances out one’s legs and gait. I can’t think of anything funny about this, though. :( Just a plain and simple, hard, cold fact. It has helped out tremendously since my total knee replacement.

Why am I writing this blog post? I have been wearing a shoe lift for so long, I forget that others are confused about wearing one. Numerous people have approached me asking for insight. Hope this helps others going through the same thing…

Find interesting? Kindly share…

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns. The site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 30+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.






Ways to Naturally Relieve Scoliosis Discomfort

Hi my favorite readers! Having lived with scoliosis (curvature of the spine) for over 35 years, I have found there are a number of ways to naturally ease the discomfort level without taking prescription pain killers. Hopefully, you will find some of these useful for your situation. They range from physical activity, stretching, to meditation.

Physical activity.
Any activity that involves excessive jostling of the spinal column is a no go. Any activity that involves excessive pressure or stress on my spinal column does not work well with me. Hence, no jet skiing. I found that out the hard way. That activity involves way too much vertical spinal movement with hard landings for me to be comfortable. The same can be said about horseback riding.

* Swimming is an excellent physical activity to engage in to ease scoliosis discomfort. The water’s natural buoyancy supports body weight, taking pressure off the spinal column and joints. Some of my favorite exercises include:
· lifting my knee to my chest,
· holding onto the pool side while pulling my legs in, and
· simply using the water as a resistance against my legs.

* Stationary rowing is another good physical activity to engage in since it strengthens my back and upper body muscles. Movable rowing allows me to stretch my back, which helps my scoliosis. The same goes for snowshoeing.

* Stationary bicycling helps my lower back and scoliosis. I feel the stretch in my glutes and lower back. It’s not fun, but it works.

* As far as calisthenics go, I sometimes use ankle weights. I simply lay flat and do leg lifts. My leg lifts are to the side and straight up. I can feel my lower back muscles working. I know that helps my scoliosis. This exercise is also marvelous when done standing up in the water.

Stretching
Stretching is fantastic for improving flexibility, hindering muscle stiffness and reducing pain. This provides an immeasurable benefit. Some of the stretching exercises that work will for me are the following:

* Lay on my back and lift my legs to my chest. I grab my knees and pull them forward until I feel the stretch in my lower back. This feels remarkably wonderful.
Laying on my side and bringing my leg forward to my chest. Again, I do this until I feel my lower back stretch.

* Lay on my back, and put my arms out sideways at shoulder length. I grab onto something to use as a foundation (like table legs, or bed sides). Then, I bring my knees to my chest. I then rock my legs side to side by holding my upper torso still. I do this until I feel a strong stretch as my lower back loosens up. Sometimes, for an extra stretch, I straighten my legs while on one side. This works great in easing any scoliosis discomfort. In fact, this is my personal favorite.

* Tai Chai provides me with a variety of stretching positions to ease my scoliosis discomfort. One particular movement involves clasping both hands and moving them overhead. Then, turn the upper torso to the right, bend to the right, and hold for a few seconds. Move back to center, and then turn to the left. The lower back stretch is wonderful from this movement.

* Another Tai Chi movement involves simply holding a ‘pretend’ ball in front of me- one hand above the other. Then, I bend to the waist level. The next movement involves keeping the bend while moving it to the right side. Same goes for the left. This move can also be done with an exercise ball. Tai Chai is a simple, yet powerful way to stretch out muscles.

* Speaking of exercise balls, these are fantastic for all-body stretches. I find that laying face down and then face up on one does wonders for alleviating my scoliosis discomfort. Laying face up with the ball across the center portion of my spine works equally as well. The stretch can be enhanced by raising arms overhead.

* Doing a simple toe-touching maneuver helps. By slightly bending my knees, I can slowly bend forward until my palms reach the floor. Holding this position until I feel my back muscles loosen greatly helps.

Meditating
Finally, meditating every day for a bit is a great way to calm the mind while also loosening the muscles.

DISCLAIMER:
This article only contains suggestions based on my personal experience in alleviating my scoliosis discomfort. They may not work for you. I will not be held responsible for any negative consequences resulting from someone following my suggestions.

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns. The site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 30+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing. She holds an advanced university degree in business administration.

Find interesting? Kindly share…






Service Dog Information Worth Sharing…

Hi everyone! Here is a YouTube video that is well worth watching. One of my friends relies on a service dog and wants as many people to know about this as possible…

Find interesting? Kindly share…Thanks!
AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns. The site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 30+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.






Seven Year Post TKR Update

Hi everyone! It has already been seven years since my tkr surgery. I thought it would be fun to share what is going on now to help others going through the same thing at this stage of post-tkr surgery. So, here goes…

* Knee swelling is still common after walking or standing for extended periods of time. I simply elevate the leg afterwards. If the swelling and pain are intense, I may apply ice. Usually I do not need to. I know many of you express concerns about swelling months or a year after a tkr, well it still happens…

* My flexibility is about 95. As I have stated before, that is where it was prior to my tkr. I am not concerned about this. I still do exercises, though, to keep my knee as flexible as possible.

* My tkr leg lies flat on the surface without any problem. What I am trying to say is…There is no space underneath, as during the initial stages of recuperation.

* Stairs are doable, but not a pretty picture when undertaken. If anyone is around, I simply ask them to conquer the steps first. If there was a race between a sloth and I, the sloth would likely win. Still..no complaints here.

* My knee still gets hot, or very warm to the touch, after overdoing it. It just takes time to cool down. I may ice it or not. It’s no biggie.

* The neuropathy left behind from my bone spur is there. Sometimes it is very painful, other times it is mild. Still other times it results in a tingling sensation that encompasses my entire leg. Elevating my leg and taking a couple AC & Cs will help. So will a gentle massage.

* My tkr will click every now and then. It’s bizarre when it happens while swimming. The clicking is no concern for me. It really does not happen that often.

* Kneeling is doable, but only with cushions underneath. It is not a common occurrence. When it does happen, I only kneel to a 95 degree angle. Anything more is too painful and uncomfortable. I don’t like pain.

* I can weave in and out of pedestrian traffic in an enviable fashion. It’s a gift and great blessing when so many people hem and haw their way around. :)

Well, I guess that is it for now. The tkr recuperation process is so difficult, the insomnia period so long, but the final result is so worth it..in my opinion.

As I said in the beginning, I hope this information has helped many of you going through the same situation. Thank you for taking the time to read.

If you find this information interesting, kindly share it with others. Thanks!

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns. The site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 30+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.






Does Your Total Knee Replacement Click?

Hi my favorite readers! Here is a reprint of a popular post I did a couple of years ago that has received very positive feedback. Quite a few readers have asked to read it again…so here it is. Enjoy!

I have had a number of readers relay information to me that I find quite interesting. It seems that there is a major concern with their bionic knees making clicking sounds. My tkr does click every now and then, but nothing serious.The majority of the time I have no problem with any “sound”. However, sometimes I do “feel” something similar to that of taking a sheet of aluminum foil and wadding it up. My bionic knee sometimes (rarely) “crinkles”.

It is a difficult feeling to describe. I cannot hear it, either. And, when I put my hand over my tkr knee, I cannot feel this “crinkling” or clicking happening. I just wanted to bring it up since I know others who have had a total knee replacement are having similar experiences as mentioned above.

Anybody else have similar experiences they would want to share?

Find interesting? Kindly share…Thanks!






Bankruptcy of Purse or Bankruptcy of Life?

Hi everyone! While perusing the Internet today, I came across a short story that perfectly makes sense to me. It is on the Race To Alaska site. I thought it was worthy of sharing since it truly does hit home. It is written by a sailor for a sailor….Concepts hold true for anyone…

“To be truly challenging, a voyage, like a life, must rest on a firm foundation of financial unrest. Otherwise, you are doomed to a routine traverse, the kind known to yachtsmen who play with their boats at sea… “cruising” it is called. Voyaging belongs to seamen, and to the wanderers of the world who cannot, or will not, fit in. If you are contemplating a voyage and you have the means, abandon the venture until your fortunes change. Only then will you know what the sea is all about.

“I’ve always wanted to sail to the south seas, but I can’t afford it.” What these men can’t afford is not to go. They are enmeshed in the cancerous discipline of “security.” And in the worship of security we fling our lives beneath the wheels of routine – and before we know it our lives are gone.

What does a man need – really need? A few pounds of food each day, heat and shelter, six feet to lie down in – and some form of working activity that will yield a sense of accomplishment. That’s all – in the material sense, and we know it. But we are brainwashed by our economic system until we end up in a tomb beneath a pyramid of time payments, mortgages, preposterous gadgetry, playthings that divert our attention for the sheer idiocy of the charade.

The years thunder by, The dreams of youth grow dim where they lie caked in dust on the shelves of patience. Before we know it, the tomb is sealed.
Where, then, lies the answer? In choice.
Which shall it be: bankruptcy of purse or bankruptcy of life? ”

– Sterling Hayden, Wanderer

Hope you enjoyed this as much as I have. Find interesting? Kindly share…Thanks!

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns. The site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 30+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.