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Five Year Post-TKR Update

Hi everyone. Many of you have asked about my five year post-tkr update. Here is a reprint of my original article, originally published March 7, 2013.

Wow..five years have already passed since my total knee replacement surgery. As the saying goes..”where has the time gone?” Anyways, it’s time for a tkr update. Thanks for reminding me of this. I am a success story for a tkr, and grateful for it.

* Nothing much has changed since my last update, actually. I am in good health except for my bionic knee.

* My knee still swells up when I overdo it. Sometimes it hurts, other times it does not.

* I can kneel, but not with as much flexibility as my “healthy” knee. That’s no big deal since I couldn’t really do that prior to my tkr surgery.

* I can walk without pain. That’s a crucial improvement, when compared to before surgery.

* I still am not on any medications. Considering my age, and the feedback from heavily prescribed friends, I am very proud of that fact.

* Sleeping is no problem at all. How grateful am I for that?! 🙂

* Flexibility is around 93. That’s what it was prior to my tkr. Once again…no biggie. I would absolutely not have a manipulation done. Never even considered it. If someone else wants to do it, that’s their business.

* Sitting is fine as long as I take periodic breaks and stretch. That’s the same for any healthy person, though.

* Exercising daily is crucial for everything, including keeping the tkr operating well. I regularly engage in swimming, stationary bicycling, walking and stretching.

* I properly nourish my body, which plays a huge role in keeping everything operating well. I eat minimal processed foods and concentrate on getting plenty of nutritious, whole foods in my system. I’ve been doing this since a kid.

* I maintain an ideal weight that is “weight-height proportionate” to reduce any impact on my joints. That’s easily done with exercise and eating properly.

That’s about it for now. How’s your post-tkr update going?

Find interesting? Kindly share…

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physical conditons for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.

NOTE: This is a republished article from 2013.







10 Natural Ways to Prepare for Total Knee Replacement Surgery

Hi everyone! We all know the importance of keeping everything as natural as possible during the entire total knee replacement process. Here is a guest post written by a tkr patient, Tamara Lujan, a 27-year practitioner of herbal and holistic healing. Below find 10 natural ways to prepare for total knee replacement surgery.

Nine weeks ago, at age 53, I had total knee replacement surgery. Some health issues and past surgeries placed me at higher risk for infection, skin tissue breakdown & blood clots. I decided to use natural treatments, dietary changes and herbs, to help ensure an easier recovery; reduce the risks of infection and inflammation; and help prevent blood clots.

As a holistic health practitioner I want people to be proactive in their health and total knee replacement surgery is no exception. I personally started by researching doctors and hospitals, finding information on everything from a doctors success rates to hospital infection percentages. I also began working on having my body in the best possible health prior to surgery.

1. Eliminate alcohol – Alcohol increases the risks of complications and slows down the recovery process.

2. Water – Water boosts your immune system, flushes toxins and helps keep you regular. I recommended about 90 ounces a day for women and 120 ounces for men.

3. Turmeric Extract – Turmeric is a powerhouse for fighting inflammation. Turmeric extract is an easy way to get the dosage you need.

4. Nettle Leaf Infusion – Dried Nettle leaves are a wonderful source of nutrients and are high in essential minerals including iron, calcium, potassium and magnesium. Nettle infusion is a miracle working when it comes to inflammation. It has worked wonders on my fibromyalgia and arthritis. It is approved by the German Commission E for reducing inflammation.

5. Nettle Seed Extract – Fighting chronic pain is exhausting. Nettle seed helps build your energy in the short term. Take up to 1 week prior to surgery.

6. Shiitake Mushrooms – at least 2 x a week (great in Miso soup!). This mushroom helps prevent thrombosis. Discontinue using 2 weeks prior to surgery.

7. Seaweed – 2 x a week. I put this in my Miso, on salads or simply to snack on. Helps prevent inflammation. Discontinue using 2 weeks prior to surgery.

8. Homeopathic Arnica Montana 30x – Used to reduce bruising, swelling and joint pain. Discontinue use 1 week prior to surgery.

9. QUERCETIN with BROMELAIN – to help build immune system and for reducing inflammation. Speak with your doctor as to recommendation on use beyond 2 weeks prior to surgery.

10. Improve your muscles and body systems – Try yoga, massage and acupuncture. These can help limber you up, reduce inflammation, and keep the lymphatic and blood system flowing.

My knee surgery went great. Based on the damage to my knee and a pre-op ROM of just 68 degrees, everyone was very surprised at my recovery and that in just 7 weeks post-op, I was at a 100 degree ROM!

*Please let your doctor and pharmacist know of any herbal and supplements you are taking.

Author Bio:
Tamara Lujan is a holistic health practitioner and herbalist with over 27 years of experience. She believes in a holistic approach to healing, which includes using whole foods and herbs to help the body heal and perform at its best. Visit Tamara at Farmacology Organics.

Find interesting? Kindly share…Thanks!
*****
AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physical conditions for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.








8 Factors Affecting Air Quality and Breathing

Hi everyone. Some of you are noticing difficulties breathing and have asked me about my situation. Other than what I have previously written about, I have come up with 8 factors affecting air quality and breathing that can easily be passed along. So, from first-hand experience….

Smoking/vaping – anything associated with nicotine. I don’t care how vaping is marketed, it’s nicotine carried via vapors. Symptoms may not be as quickly noticeable as tobacco smoking, but it still pollutes the air.

Tobacco. My body is super-sensitive to tobacco in any form. Whether it be second-hand smoke from cigarettes or cigars, smokey rooms, breathing someone’s tobacco breath, or any similar situation – I react.

Body odor. No description needed. Please.. soap, water, and effort is all it takes.

Bad breath. No description needed on how this affects air quality and breathing.

Cologne/body fragrances. Au naturale has my vote. I hope there’s not a commercial fragrance with that title.

Cleaning agents. Many commercially-prepared agents affect air quality. Start using natural sources like bleach, baking soda, and/or vinegar for results at a fraction of the cost. It’s amazing how a little baking soda on a wet cloth can scrub away grime.

Scented candles. Some more than others affect air quality and breathing.

Dust. Not everyone is sensitive to dust. I am. I once ended up with horrendous symptoms by attempting to sleep in a room full of dusty 40-year old collectibles.

My guests did not understand my breathlessness, migraine, nausea, vomiting, and sluggishness. I never stayed there again.

Well, I think that’s enough for now. Air quality does affect breathing, to some extent. Depending upon your individual situation, you may have it better or worse.

Remember, there are many more reasons that your breathing may be negatively affected. I recommend performing a Google search for health information on this topic, if interested.

Hope this helps others going through the same thing.

Find interesting? Kindly share….Thanks!

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.







Breathing Is A Gift: Treasure It

Hi everyone. Do you every think that breathing is a gift? It is so easy to take it for granted when all is going well. Here is a real-life story to provide more insight into why you need to treasure it.

As many of you already know, I fractured my C-1 (first cervical vertebrae) in 1975. One of the after effects is breathing difficulties. Shortness of breath is a daily occurrence for me ever since. There are many trigger points that enhance its impact.

Improper pillow. You probably see commercials about the importance of having a comfortable pillow. Have you ever noticed how difficult it is to buy a good-fitting, comfortable pillow? I have. The process is termed..PITA. If you don’t know what that stands for, just …as the saying goes…GOOGLE it.

Pillows can seem so worthwhile in the market, while feeling them up. It’s only when getting home and actually using them that the truth comes out. Either too full, too flat, too fluffy, or too cumbersome.

The wrong pillow affects my breathing. It may affect yours, as well. This occurs when the vertebrae are misaligned. Pain shoots everywhere from my head to my toes. (Especially my neck.) A misaligned neck makes breathing very difficult. It hinders sleeping, also. Not good….

There are many nights when sleeping on folded towels is the solution. Or, simply laying flat. Flatness provides instantaneous relief. Nice…

Mattress. A good mattress makes all the difference, also. Pillow-top versions do not feign well with spinal alignment. Some consider these versions “romantic”, not me. Give me a firm mattress any day and twice on Sunday.

Regularly rotating and turning the mattress will help even out mattress wear-and-tear. A mattress that needs rotating will cause spinal misalignment – hence, shortness of breath.

Poor posture. This is common sense, but must be mentioned. The older I have gotten, the more I realize not everyone has common sense. Shortness of breath occurs more often when my neck is misaligned.

Poor diet. After 40+ years of living with daily shortness of breath, I know for a fact that processed foods, in particular, hinder my breathing. It may be the preservatives, excess sugar/fat/additives, or handling. Whatever it is, I minimize my usage of these “foods”.

Stress. Isn’t stress the cause of many health problems? You bet it is. Whatever shape or form it takes, excess stress hinders breathing. I would think we all share that dilemma. It’s only when realizing it that we can change it. Sometimes it is much easier said than done.

OK…I think that’s enough for now. You may be wondering why I choose to write about breathing on a blog that mainly discusses total knee replacement concerns. It is because I have been experiencing increased bouts of shortness of breath lately. I blame it on the pillow. It also happened during my tkr recuperation.

Hope this helps others going through the same thing.

MORAL OF STORY: Never take your breathing for granted. There are those who would give almost anything for the delight of effortless breathing. Breathing is a gift…Treasure it.

Find interesting? Kindly share it….

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.







How to Get the Most Out of Physical Therapy After Knee Replacement Surgery

Hi everyone. With so much information available knowadays about getting the most out of your total knee replacement, I thought it would be worthwhile to share a guest post written by the experts at The Joint Replacement Therapists. I am certain this insight about physical therapy after knee replacement surgery is the key to your success. Enjoy…
*****
Physical therapy is an integral part to any individual’s knee replacement recovery. There are thousands of physical therapists and physical therapy clinics throughout the country, and the majority of physical therapists are professional, knowledgeable, and caring.

Your therapists will provide you with all the information and resources you require to have a successful knee replacement. What you get out of your rehab after surgery will be a direct reflection of what you put into it.

With that being said, we’d like to share our advice for how to get the most out of your physical therapy after your knee replacement surgery.

Start Before Surgery

Rehab begins before surgery. This is known as prehab or preoperative rehab. Numerous studies have shown the benefits of physical therapy and physical training before surgery. Individuals who train and exercise before knee replacement surgery have better range of motion, strength, and overall function after the surgery.

This leads to a quicker recovery. (See our blog post titled: What is Prehab? )

Learn About Pain

Pain is complex and many factors in your life contribute to pain including physical, social, psychological, emotional, and environmental. The more you can learn about the contributors to pain, the more you’ll be able to make positive lifestyle changes to manage the pain effectively.

Understand the Process and Have Patience

Recovery takes time. You may only notice small improvements initially, and that is okay. The average course of outpatient physical therapy can last 12-16 weeks, but you may not experience 100% recovery for up to 6 months. Keep doing all the right things and eventually it will pay off with a great recovery and outcome.

Follow Instructions

Everything your physical therapist tells you is for a reason. Any instructions we provide is based off the goal of you having a full and positive recovery with no avoidable setbacks.

Ask Questions

Your physical therapists, and all the healthcare professionals, are there to help you. Do not feel intimidated to ask any and all questions. Being well-informed and knowledgeable regarding all aspects of your recovery will only benefit you more. There are no stupid questions.

Be Consistent

You won’t notice much change in strength or range of motion after just one therapy session. However, if you remain consistent with your exercises and activities, and regularly attend therapy, little by little you will see the fruits of your labors.

Consider Your Complete Health

Many factors play a role in your recovery after knee replacement surgery. Consider all aspects of your health and determine where you can make some positive changes. Consider things like nutrition, sleep, emotional health, mental health and more.

Continue After Therapy Ends

Your recovery does not stop once you are discharged from physical therapy. It is important to continue with all the exercises you learned in physical therapy and perform them on a regular basis.

It is also important to find ways to maintain the health of your knee and whole body. Great activities to try include walking, aquatic exercises, yoga, and much more.

About the Authors

The Joint Replacement Therapists, Doctors Jordan and Luke Pedersen, are two physical therapists and the founders of the Joint Replacement Therapists website at The Joint Replacement Therapists.

Jordan and Luke are orthopedic therapists who have worked with many individuals before and after joint replacement surgery.

They realized the shortcomings with a lot of the educational material available to individuals considering joint replacement surgery. The Joint Replacement Therapists strive to provide thorough evidence-based information in an organized manner for individuals considering or planning joint replacement surgery.

Their hopes are the information gained will help decrease patient anxieties and improve confidence regarding the entire joint replacement process.
***************

Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

Booktoots’ Healing site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 30+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.







Happy St. Patrick’s Day!

Happy St. Patrick’s Day to everyone! May the luck of the Irish be with you!

st pat

Find interesting? Kindly share..Thanks!






Living With Severe Neuropathy & a TKR

Hi everyone! I have been receiving numerous inquiries regarding sciatica, nerve pain, and other pains associated with a tkr or total knee replacment. The timing is ideal since I have been experiencing high levels of neuropathy pain. Here’s the scoop that I trust will provide further insight…

As I have written about in other posts that prior to my tkr, bone spurs were digging into my nerves. They were severing my nerves. (The nerves are located alongside the lateral portion of my knee.)

Prior to my tkr, I had to readjust my entire body in order to compensate for this extreme pain.

What is interesting is that almost 10 years post-tkr, this neuropathy pain can be excruciating at times. I know that my situation could be much worse, but believe it
is worthy of sharing with you.

The level of discomfort is simply noticeable and potentially hindering. I do not know when it will happen. It is unpredictable.

There are times when the neuropathy leads to my entire tkr leg tingling. Sometimes there is pain, other times there is not. It is the strangest feeling.

Right now, I am sitting at a computer using proper ergonomics, and I feel my lower leg tingling all the way down to the ends of my toes. I straighten my leg and the tingling diminishes. Other times I straighten my leg and the tingling continues.

I always like to pay particular attention to activities happening when the pain and/or tingling occur. I do notice that the neuropathy pain occurs when lifting any amount of weight. Even carrying some grocery bags does this.

It sometimes happens when I am swimming. It can happen when standing for more than 5-10 minutes. These are just some situations that pop into my mind as I am writing this article.

How do I ease the pain? I try my best to find stress-reducing body positions. Some work one time and not another. I lightly massage the area. This provides temporary relief, usually.

There are several yoga stretches that help, like the pyramid pose. Touching toes, downward-facing dog, and camel pose all provide relief, also.

And: Elevating my leg works some times, not all the time. In short, my remedies provide unpredictable results. I take aspirin, but dread popping pills for a number of reasons.

Hope this helps others going through the same thing. Find interesting? Kindly share with others who may benefit. Thank you!

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.






Can You Wiggle Your Toes?

Hi everyone. This popped into my mind last night and thought it worthy enough to include here. So…When initially hospitalized after my car accident, I was continually asked the same question. Every morning the doctors would make their daily rounds and when they surrounded my bed, I was asked “Can you wiggle your toes?” Why?

As I have written previously about, one injury I ‘suffered’ was a spinal column injury. My first cervical vertebrae (aka a “C-1”) was fractured. It was a clear break that required laying flat with sand bags on each side of my head.

One of the common injuries sustained after a fractured C-1 is paralysis. How did I know? I asked.

First, the doctors would remove the sheets from covering my feet. One would feel my toe temperature to see how well my blood was circulating. Then, it was time to show whether or not my toes could move. “Can you wiggle your toes?” I heard. It took all the energy I had to show them I could.

Picture a pair of feet here….

I do not remember how much my toes moved, only that they moved. The doctors all exhaled signs of relief when this happened. I silently did so.

When first introduced to this technique, I was too drugged to wonder what was going on. As I regained some of my faculties, I began getting annoyed with this daily question. “What do you mean can I wiggle my toes?! Of course I can,” I would think. After I found out why I was being asked it, my annoyance turned into interest and strong concern.

I am one of the lucky individuals who did not experience any level of paralysis from this fracture. I have always been grateful for how some medical information/status was held back from me during my initial hospitalization stays. It was for the betterment.

Hopefully, this helps others going through the same thing.

Find interesting? Kindly share…

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physical concerns.

This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.







Nine Year Post-TKR Update

Hi everyone. I regularly get asked about my tkr – or total knee replacement – updates. It’s nice to know that my insight is helpful to so many of you. The time has come for another one.

It is hard to believe that nine years have already passed since I had my total knee replacement. So, here is my 9 Year Post-TKR Update:

I have stated it before throughout this blog, but need to reiterate. I am a successful recipient of a bionic knee. Luckily, I am experiencing no complications, nor have I ever. I have never had a manipulation.

Here are some of things going on that are worth mentioning….

I am proudly on ZERO medications and in my 60’s.

My tkr knee still swells when overdoing it. Sometimes it is painful.

My “good” knee occasionally crunches like paper, but has no pain.

My tkr sometimes click. It is nothing of concern. I have written about this previously.

My bionic knee flexibility is where it was prior to my total knee replacement.

Kneeling is possible, but with some support and pain.

I can get on the floor, but it surely is not a pretty picture. It would make a good YouTube video, for sure.

I regularly exercise. Many exercises are the same ones I did preparing for my tkr.

My exercises include: swimming, isometrics, walking, chair yoga, yoga, lifting weights, and balance – among others.

Walking on uneven,unsecured surfaces (like gravel) is uncomfortable. It can be done, though. I just take my time. This issue occurred prior to my tkr and still exists.

I maintain an ideal weight.

I believe the reason I am doing so well is that I have been living a healthy lifestyle, long before it became the current rage. I eat plenty of produce and always have. So much, in fact, that it can get tiring having so much to compost. 🙂

My meal plan plays a key role in living with my tkr. I severely limit my consumption of the standard American diet. “We are what we eat”, as the saying goes. Nothing pleases me more than enjoying some steamed veggies and a protein. I firmly believe that moderation is the key.

I hope this 9-year post-tkr update helps others going through the same thing. – Marie

Find interesting? Kindly share…

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

The site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.







Knee Braces & A TKR

Hi everyone. Some of you have asked me if I have tried using a knee brace prior to having a tkr (total knee replacement). The answer is “yes”. Here is my story about knee braces and a tkr…

Prior to my total knee replacement, I tried everything I could to avoid the pain. One thing I did was wear a knee brace. It was painful and I didn’t understand why. That is, until I saw an x-ray of my knee.

I had bone spurs on each side of my knee that had developed due to my knee being bone-on-bone. I have written other blog posts about my bone spurs. Here is some more insight…

A knee brace stabilizes the knee joint by compressing the muscles. I can see how a brace would work for many people with knee concerns. However, the muscle compression caused my bone spurs to dig into my nerves more than usual. That compression, in turn, resulted in increased pain.

The knee brace did keep my knee joint better aligned. I can see why many people find them helpful. Knee braces may be great for others, but they did not work for me. It just goes to show that everyone is different. You may be the same.

Hope this insight helps others going through the same thing.

Find interesting? Kindly share with others…

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.