Booktoots

Happy Veterans Day

Happy Veterans Day to all my U.S. readers and Remembrance Day to all my Canadian readers.

Take some time today to thank a veteran for giving us our freedoms and sacrificing their live to protect us.

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Hot Tubs & A TKR

Hi everyone. Have you wondered about getting into a hot tub after your tkr? I know I have. With friends loving how great hot tubs were for relaxing, I was hesitant. For some reason, I had visions of the prosthetic heating up and causing discomfort. Have you thought the same thing about hot tubs and a tkr?

After searching the Internet for answers and finding none, I figured I’d write this post about my first-hand experience. Here is what I have experienced while using hot tubs after a tkr:

It took me 3.5 years post-tkr to finally “take the plunge”. My tkr didn’t even cross my mind, just the fact that I’ve heard such great things about hot tubs taking care of aches and pains while providing a sense of relaxation.

I figured I’d give it a chance before my swimming exercise. Wow…did it ever work. In fact, it worked marvelously.

Using a hot tub regularly provides many benefits. Benefits include less aches and pain when moving, more fluid movements and an overall increased sense of being. All from  soaking for 10-15 minutes. Woohoo!!

Even though hot tubs may work for me, however, remember that everyone is different. They may not work for you. Consult with your doctor before using.

Hope it helps others going through the same thing.

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Daily Inspiration

Hi my favorite readers,
I have added a left-sided widget titled “Daily OM” in an attempt to keep your spirit uplifted, gain insight and bring a smile to your face. Daily OM’s mission is to “Nourish the mind, body and spirit”. How important is that during a tkr recuperation? Or, any time throughout life? Very, I’d say.

Enjoy!

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Relaxing Way to Stretch Hamstrings

You want to stretch your legs out after a nice walk on your new tkr? Stretching out the hamstrings can be so pleasurable and relaxing before or after any kind of extended use. Immediately after a tkr, we are instructed to do recuperation maneuvers that specifically work on regaining use of the hamstrings. Hamstrings, located on the backside of your knee and thigh, play an important role in supporting your knee joint. You probably knew that anyway, I just thought I’d throw it in to be safe. Here is an exercise that works well for me, 3.5 years post-tkr. It may work for you as well. Before doing the exercise, remember to check with your doctor or therapist first to prevent further injury. The exercise may not be suitable for you.

Stand facing a stair well. Lift your leg and place the foot onto two steps above where you stand. Your thigh needs to be parallel to the surface. Gently lean your upper body forward until you feel a marvelous stretch along the backside of your thigh and lower back. Hold this stretch for as long as comfortable.

Return your leg to the original position. Repeat exercise with your other leg.
This exercise was not possible for a good time after my tkr due to mobility and/or pain concerns, so “discovering” it now is very welcome.

Try it, you may like it. Find interesting? Kindly share..







An Aquatic Heel Slide for TKR

Hi everyone. There are a number of exercises online that apply to tkr recuperation, but very little on any aquatic ones. So…here’s a good one that we learn to do while doing land-based maneuvers. In water it’s known as an aquatic heel slide for tkr.

Plus, exercising in water reduces pain by taking pressure off your joints .  It is also impossible to fall.

STEPS:

Get into chest-deep water and place both feet firmly on the bottom of the pool. Extend both arms to your sides and place them on the pool’s side. Your body will resemble a large “T” at this point.

Gently lift your tkr leg and bend your knee. Place the sole of your tkr-side foot on the pool’s wall.

Slide your foot as far as possible to bend your knee without causing undue pain.

Hold this aquatic heel slide for tkr stretch for 10 seconds, or as long as comfortable. Slowly return your leg to the standing position. Relax for 10 seconds. Repeat this exercise 10 times.

If standing in chest-deep water is too uncomfortable, do this exercise in waist-deep water. Or, if you are comfortable in deep water, do this exercise there. Just make certain to properly anchor yourself with your arms.

Hope this helps others going through the same thing.

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AUTHOR NOTE: <a href=”https://www.booktoots.com” title=”Booktoots’ Healing”>Booktoots’ Healing</a> helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physical conditions for over 30+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.

Water Activity & A TKR

We all know how beneficial exercising in water can be for sore joints, or for any condition. Recently, I had a chance to go swimming at a newly-built pool and thought I’d share my experiences.

I’ve always been curious about my tkr flexibility, 3.5 years post-tkr. I’ve heard such praise for water being a great way to increase mobility and range of motion. So..I signed up for an adaptive aquatics class out of curiosity.

It was great. I was given some exercises to increase my hip range of motion. On land, the movement was definitely not fun and far too discouraging since the effort did not seem to warrant many results. The exercise consisted of simply (“simply?!”) standing with my back straight, holding onto a chair for support and lifting my tkr leg to the side as high as possible.

In water, wow. I did not have to fight gravity since water contains a natural buoyancy that supports the majority of body weight, making movement more fluid and easy. I knew that beforehand, but wanted to see how it really worked after my tkr. Nice..Water also supplies a natural resistance atmosphere, strengthening muscles at the same time it stretches them. Water contains more than 14 times the resistance of air. Standing with my back against the pool’s side supported my back during the exercise.

Another exercise involved standing with my back against the pool’s side and doing a leg lift. Extending both arms, shoulder-level, and resting my arms on the pool’s side added extra support. The exercise consists of lifting both legs in front of the body, just below water level. Hold this position for 10 seconds, or as long as possible. Slowly return to the standing position. Repeat this exercise 10 times.

I was introduced to an exercise noodle, an aquatic workout tool, and am looking forward to learning about new uses. There’s an entire unexplored arena of aquatic tools beckoning. 🙂

And, swimming laps was a blast. Not only did swimming supply an all-body workout, but did it without any pain. Can’t wait to go back.

Back on land, my tkr knee is more flexible..without all the pain associated with land-based exercises. Nice. 🙂

Hope this helps others going through the same thing.

Do you have aquatic experiences you’d like to share with others? Feel free…

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Update on TKR Clicking

It’s nice to see how much support and feedback has been received about a post I did on tkr clicking. The original post was written over 2 years ago, but comments are still being posted. Apparently, I was not alone in experiencing this concern.

I felt an update was appropriate. (Probably because I was just asked for one…thanks to my favorite readers. 🙂 )

First of all, my total knee replacement surgery happened 02/2008. So, use the following information to form your opinion.

My tkr clicks when I first stand up after sitting for a while. A while can range anywhere from 20 minutes to one hour. I get antsy sitting for longer than an hour, anyways. Sometimes my tkr knee clicks multiple times, other times it’s only once or twice.

I’m not concerned about it since it’s not causing any undue hardship, discomfort or pain. Plus, it’s not that common of an occurrence.

I count my blessings, since I understand that’s not the case for everyone who’s undergone a total knee replacement. After reading what some of my readers say about having doctors wanting to perform all kinds of surgery on them after a tkr, I also count my blessings for having an excellent tkr surgeon that doesn’t do that.

Hope this helps others going through the same thing.

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A Natural Way to Strengthen Eyes..

Do you take your eyesight for granted? I hope not. That is definitely something to be treasured and worked on. It’s always amazing to me when I see individuals doing work or crafts that involve great amounts of upclose, detailed work. Kudos, I say.

Your eye muscles need strengthening and stretching just as much as any other muscle in your body. In addition to doing the typical exercises of rotating, sideways moving, distance gazing, etc…here’s an activity that will not only work your eye muscles, but provide a great deal of fun….

Watch a hockey game. Not the beginning levels, since players are still developing speed and agility, but more advanced levels such as those found in the NHL. The higher up in the hockey echelon, the faster the play. These elite athletes make the game appear easy and effortless while instilling a sense of wonderment.

While patiently (?) waiting for the upcoming NHL season, I had a chance to watch a repeat of a playoff game the other day. Having not watched hockey for a while, it was very entertaining to realize what an efficient eye workout that sport is. And..I was just sitting on the sofa. Just watching the players and following the puck during the game involves active movement of eye muscles. Nice…

So, if you already love hockey..this provides another reason to love the sport. If you don’t enjoy hockey (and, please don’t say you were watching a fight and a hockey game broke out…:?…that’s old)…you can begin multi-tasking while enhancing your health and spirit. 🙂 Go for it..

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How To Find What You’re Looking For..

Hello my favorite readers,
I wanted to remind everyone that if you’re searching for a particular topic regarding tkr, total knee replacement, surgery or rehab on this site…look to the upper right-hand corner. There you will see a search box. As with any Internet search, place your keyword or keyword phase into the box. Then press Enter.

Results of posts containing your keyword search will appear on your screen. Scroll through them until you find what you are looking for.

I’m mentioning this since so many readers state that information is not on this site and it is. This site has been in existence for 3.5 years. So, if you’re coming onto it today and thinking you’ll find a quick and easy post…the post may have been written three years ago.

So, my tkr friends…Performing a keyword search as described above can save time and be a fun way to find what you’re looking for.

Enjoy!

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Nausea After a TKR?

Hi everyone. One of my readers questioned whether anyone had concerns regarding nausea after undergoing a tkr (total knee replacement). I have written about this in former posts dating back to 2008, but will reiterate.

The only nausea I had initially was from the local anesthesia while in the hospital. The anesthesia resulted in appetite loss, dizziness, impaired speech and light-headedness. I didn’t eat anything for one day and then slowly started eating small amounts. First time I stood up for physical therapy, I vomited.

Once the anesthesia cleared out of my body, nausea was not an issue. This coincided with my hospital discharge. I believe the physical exercises and drinking plenty of fluids helped flush out the anesthesia. I’ve gotten nauseous from anesthesia after other surgeries, so I wasn’t concerned. Nothing surprised me since a tkr is major surgery and anesthesia is poison. Ask any anesthesiologist.

While recuperating at home after my tkr, nausea occurred when I took prescribed pain meds. The nausea curbed my appetite enough to lose 10 pounds over two months.

After trying different pain meds for two months (none working other than increasing nausea levels), the nausea stopped. Ice was a much better and healthier pain reliever during tkr rehab.

By the way, please remember everyone is different and has unique experiences and recuperation stories.

This site is not intended to provide negative feedback. Only real-life experiences are shared on this site, both positive and negative. How you interpret the wording is up to you.

Have you had issues with nausea after your tkr? Kindly share your experience to help others, whether you have or have not.

Hope this helps others going through the same thing.
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AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots Healing  helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

This award-winning tkr blog is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physical conditions for over 40+ years.

Her books are available on Amazon, Kindle, and other sites in hard copy and ebook formats. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.

Can TKR Rehab Provide Good Cardio?

You bet it can. We all know how important cardiovascular exercise is for good overall health. It lowers risks of developing chronic illnesses such as heart disease, stroke, diabetes and obesity while also increasing heart health. Did you ever tie in cardio with tkr rehab, though? Here’s something that may help you…

While recuperating from a tkr, cardio occurred naturally for me. It happened when I started using the exercise bike. I sweated like it was going out of style, and I wasn’t even pedaling fast. And, I wasn’t intentionally trying to get cardio. That was the nice part about it. My goal was to perform the pedaling motion while increasing my tkr knee flexibility. It was very, very hard work. (As I’m sure all-tkr people know…)

After only pedaling two minutes, wow…heart rate up, sweat rate up, face flushed. It felt good to get such a beneficial workout. (My tkr knee didn’t feel good, though…)

Just thought I’d share this for those going through the same thing. Moral of story: Change your viewpoint of tkr rehab. Instead of looking at it as simply a way to get most usage out of your tkr, view it also as cardio. You’re helping your knee and heart health.

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Exercise Bike Sturdiness & TKR Recovery

Hi everyone. Rehabilitation from a tkr, ranging from initial stages to more advanced ones, includes riding a stationary bike to improve knee flexibility and muscle strength. Not all exercise bikes are created equally, though.  Understanding the importance of exercise bike sturdiness & tkr recovery can prevent injury. Why, you ask?

When first using a stationary bike, known as an exercise bike, your tkr leg will not be flexible enough to comfortably perform the entire pedaling rotation. Your healthy leg will do the majority of the work while your tkr leg goes along for the ride.

And, when the pedaling motion emphasizes using your tkr leg, since your leg will be so straight, it’s only natural to lean over to your healthy side. Leaning over to the healthy side can easily lead to tipping over unless your bike is made out of heavyweight materials that increase overall sturdiness. The exercise bike I have weighs 100+ pounds and is next to impossible to push over. In fact, it takes everything (almost, anyways..:) to just move it around so I can position it safely to use.

Before purchasing any exercise bike, try it out to see how it holds your body weight and body leaning. Have someone with you, for safety purposes. Also give the bike the push-over test. If it easily falls over, forget buying or using it. I know that’s common sense, but every piece of advice helps.

Plus, the older I get, the more I realize not everyone has common sense. Sad, but true. I’ve read numerous online articles about using an exercise bike while recuperating from a tkr. Nowhere have I read about placing importance on the exercise bike sturdiness & tkr recovery. So…know that sturdiness plays an essential role in your safety while recuperating from a tkr.

Some exercise bikes can be made out of a ‘real’ bike placed onto a portable base turning the bike into a stationary bike. The bases I have seen appear flimsier than traditional-style exercise bikes.

In fact, I have seen healthy-legged individuals almost tip over while using these devices. Maybe there are more expensive versions that specifically prevent tipping over, I don’t know. If you want to try them, you may have better luck.

Hope this helps everyone going through the same thing.

Find this post about exercise bike sturdiness & tkr recovery interesting? Kindly share..Thanks!

AUTHOR NOTE: <a href=”https://www.booktoots.com” title=”Booktoots’ Healing”>Booktoots’ Healing</a> helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 30+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.