Booktoots

Happy Father’s Day!

Happy Father’s Day to all my fathering readers, of all creatures.
Take the day to spoil yourself and enjoy. 🙂

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A Gentle All-Leg Stretch

We all know how stiff our hamstrings (backside of knee) are immediately after a tkr. This stiffness needs working on continuously to improve flexibility of our knee area. Here’s an exercise I wanted to share that comes in handy even 3.5 years post-tkr. Actually, it’s a good exercise for anyone who wants to keep muscles flexible and stretched. In addition to providing a great hamstrings stretch, it stretches the entire backside of your legs. Enjoy!!

The exercise is a variation of the yoga pose known as Downward Facing Dog. It’s adapted because the angle varies according to your personal level of fitness. There are times when the actual angle does not provide as much stretch as I’d like for whatever reason. Here’s what works best for me and may work for you…

Stand upright with your feet shoulder width apart. Gently bend from the waist and move your upper torso toward the floor. Bend as far as possible until you feel a gentle stretch along the backside of your entire leg. If done correctly, the stretch will feel wonderful, not painful. Slowly place your hands on the floor. Increase the stretch by opening your hands and placing your palms directly on the floor. Hold the position 20 seconds, or as long as you’re comfortable.

Try it, but do so at your own risk. Remember, we all differ. What works for me, may not work for you.

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Difficulties With a Shoe Lift After a TKR

HI everyone..Recently, I was asked why my shoe lift keeps changing. I don’t know why. The doctors do not know why. I am having difficulties with a shoe lift after a tkr.

Here’s the story:
For 30 years my shoe lift was 1.25″ due to a fractured femur I experienced after a car accident. Then, I had my tkr. As I wrote about in previous posts, I needed to retrain my hamstrings and learn to walk using a “normal” gait. It seems to have been all in vain.

I didn’t wear a shoe lift for the first year after my tkr since I didn’t think I needed it. I thought the surgery realigned my leg (I was bowlegged prior due to being bone on bone). I could walk like a regular person, finally.

So, I bought and wore “normal” shoes. Then, my hips and body seemed misaligned. this is when I started thinking there were difficulties with a shoe lift after a tkr. I went to the doctor to find out if I indeed did need a shoe lift. No measurements were taken, just blocks put underneath my tkr leg. I needed a 3/4″ shoe lift.

I wore the 3/4â” lift for a year and started feeling out of balance with joint pain and all that fun stuff caused by poor spinal alignment. I needed more shoe lift. Some days it seemed I needed more than other days. Strange. So, I went back to the doctor. More blocks were put underneath my tkr leg.

This time I needed 1-3/8″ lift. So, it really is only 1/8″ more than what it was prior to my tkr. Interesting.

Since having that shoe lift, it’s been about one month, my pain and imbalance has disappeared. Fantastic!

So, when I am asked why my shoe lift keeps changing…there is no simple answer. I still don’t know why. I’m just glad to be out of pain and walk comfortably.

Hope this helps others going through the same thing.

Find interesting? Kindly share…Thanks!

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 30+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.

Why Not Ask A TKR Survivor?

I am confused and frankly, frustrated, with things I have been reading. While doing research into bones, healthy knees, knee replacement, etc…I came across a recent study done by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

The study was done about the impact of certain activities upon an artificial knee joint. Four artificial joints had measuring devices in them and were implanted into four separate patients. The findings were presented to the audience, etc.

Instead of wasting money on studies, did anyone ask tkr recipients? No. A survey could have been conducted requesting tkr patients to provide feedback. What better way to get information than from actual patients? That’s my opinion, anyways.

If someone would have asked me about playing golf after my tkr, I could have told them of the increased stress. Due to that discomfort, I am not golfing anymore. The golf swing is quite stressful on my tkr joint and entire body. Some other individuals may differ. I wrote another post about this on this site.

And, now there’s a study involving four implanted patients that is surprising the medical community with the findings. Interesting…

For more information, here’s the link:

http://www6.aaos.org/news/Pemr/releases/release.cfm?releasenum=662

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Memorial Day

Even though remembering our military personnel throughout the year needs to be done, today is Memorial Day in the United States. This day is set aside to specifically pay tribute to our fallen heroes who sacrificed their life for our country and freedoms we many times take for granted.

Remember to thank a veteran or any current military personnel you meet.







Another Use for TKR Pain Meds

Hi Everyone,

I noticed that some of you have been wondering about pain meds for dealing with tkr pain. Even though I am not promoting using pain meds at every opportunity, some time they just make things easier.

Some may use pain meds to provide relief during sleeping after a tkr (or…attempting to sleep..:?). I never thought of that since I don’t like the thought of taking drugs to go to sleep. (I’m not much for medication-based sleep aids.)

Others may find pain meds helpful throughout the day to make functioning more manageable since the tkr leg can hurt so often without reason. Still others may find that a pain med eases the discomfort after exercising.

While going for my daily walk this morning, I thought about sharing another use for pain meds that I haven’t written about before…

As a preventative aid. Take a pain med 30 minutes before exercising, either while preparing for tkr physical therapy or any time afterwards. Taking it 30-minutes prior to exercising gives your body enough time to absorb the drug. This was recommended to me during my therapy period immediately after my tkr surgery.

The med is supposed to take the edge off of therapy. Initially, I tried it and didn’t receive much help. It may work for you during these stages, though. I just remember the extreme pain of having the therapist pulling and pushing on my tkr leg. No amount of drugs could have eased that pain.

I have found out that, three years post-tkr, sometimes taking a pain med prior to exercising does makes a difference. I mentioned before about getting used to a new shoe lift and recuperating from a sprained ankle. Well, while preparing for my daily walk, my tkr-side leg joints were rather stiff and painful.

So, I took two AC & C’s and went for a walk. There was no discomfort or pain. It was great. Plus, as an anti-inflammatory, the aspirin kept the ankle swelling down. Remember, though, my pain level is nowhere near what it was the first year post-tkr.

After the initial stages of tkr rehab, pain meds can come in handy at different times.

Do you have any experiences with pain meds after a tkr to share? Please do…

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AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

This healthline.com award-winning site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 30+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.

We All Need Some Bone Health Info….

Hi my favorite readers!

While doing online research recently into bone health, I came upon a site I believe is worthy of sharing. The topic is bone disease and bone health, most importantly – osteoporosis, a disease that results in weakened bones or bone loss.

Taken from their site: The mission of American Bone Health is to mobilize communities with timely bone health information that supports strong and healthy bones and prevents osteoporosis and fractures.

There’s a ton of info on this site, including eating well for healthy bones, nutrition, recipes, tips, exercise and fall prevention. Check it out at:

Http://www.americanbonehealth.org

And…no…I’m not getting paid to share this information. Just trying to be helpful since we all have bone issues. Enjoy!

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Rubber Band Feeling & Pain Relief

Hi my favorite readers! I’ve written about breaking in my new shoe lift and spraining my ankle in the process before. Yikes. A couple of days ago something interesting happened that involves a rubber band feeling and pain relief. I felt worthy of sharing. It highlights the importance of exercise.

While sitting on the sofa, I noticed that my tkr-side ankle (the one I sprained) did not flex as much as my healthy ankle, especially while moving my toes away from my body.

Plus, it was still painful. Interesting. I started doing more ankle stretching exercises including circles and pointing maneuvers to improve my ankle flexibility.

A couple days later while on my daily walk, I was moving my tkr leg forward and settling my foot onto the pavement as part of my usual gait.

Suddenly something feeling like a rubber band (I don’t know how else to describe it) moved back and forth all the way from my ankle to the outside of my knee.

It was a comforting type of pain, but very unusual. I stopped walking for a few seconds then slowly started walking again. Suddenly, my ankle flexibility increased and pain diminished.

Upon finishing my walk, I showered and settled into a comfortable position on the sofa, ready to watch my hockey playoff game. I propped up my ankle, as usual, and started doing my ankle stretches. Sure enough. I could point my toes further away from me than before the “rubber band occurrance”. Wow…

I’m not a medical professional, but somehow, those stretching exercises paid off. It took a while, but …woohoo!!!

Hopefully this helps others going through the same thing.

Find this tkr blog post about a rubber band feeling and pain relief interesting? Kindly share..Thanks!

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

This award-winning site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 30+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.

Happy Mother’s Day

Happy Mother’s Day to all my mothering readers, of all creatures. Enjoy and spoil yourselves!

Thanks for stopping by. 🙂

Rating Pain

Something interesting happens when we deal with pain. Interesting to me, anyways. The medical profession asks us to rate it on a scale of 1-10, with one being minimal and 10 being excruciating.

I find that very confusing. It’s very difficult to “rate pain” if you’ve been dealing with it for over 30 years. You become accustomed to it and just accept it. It’s a part of life, sometimes a little worse, sometimes a little more. So, what’s up with suddenly rating it? I just don’t get it.

Plus, some individuals, like myself, have had a fractured C-1 and closed head injury. For the past 35 years I have been unable to judge when something was too much until I overdo so severely that it’s difficult to function. After doing research into C-1 fractures and head injuries lately, I found out why that is. It turns out that a fractured C-1 (first cervical vertebrae) hinders the transmitting of signals from the body to the brain. Wow…It was nice to find that out. It provided much needed insight.

So…back to the pain threshold measurement tool. How does it help anyone? I still don’t understand it. It’s so subjective, how can it be useful?

That’s my opinion, anyways. Hoping this helps others going through the same thing.

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Another Ankle Strengthener Exercise After a TKR

Hi my favorite readers! We all know that recuperating from a tkr, total knee replacement, means strengthening and stretching your hamstring muscles. Well, it turns out that working on those muscles can also decrease ankle pain. I found that out personally while using hills as another ankle strengthener recuperation tool.

While breaking in my new shoe lift and recuperating from my ankle sprain on my tkr leg, I did my usual zero-elevation pavement walk. During the initial stages of recuperating from a sprained ankle, walking slowly on even surfaces worked well.

Nothing was rushed and I’d take breaks as my ankle told me to. As with any good recuperative program, I gradually increased my time walking while also applying the RICE technique nightly.

My ankle pain and swelling diminished enough to warrant advancing to the next level of challenge. It took about two weeks of daily walking to reach this point.

In fact, level pavement walking was becoming rather boring. So…I saw the hill and gave it a shot.

The advanced-level walk includes walking down the hill in the normal fashion, and walking back up the hill backwards. I know the area very well and was certain there were no potential hazards that would cause problems while walking backwards for a distance.

A surprising result, my ankle pain has diminished extensively. I attribute it to gradual progression in exercising plus compressing my ankle area with an elastic bandage and elevating my leg nightly.

It’s good old RICE. Another benefit, walking up and down hills provides a more intense cardio workout. Can’t beat that… Nice. 🙂

Another surprising result after using the RICE technique was the multiple clicking episodes affecting my tkr knee. It was a noticeable string of consecutive, sequenced clicks when first walking after elevating my leg for awhile. Very strange.

BTW..I also realize I cannot bend my ankle as much as I used to while wearing this increased shoe lift. The extra movement causes excessive strain. (My lift is now 1.5″, which is no drop in the bucket. It could be worse, though.) Interesting…

Thought I’d share this tkr insight in case others are experiencing a similar situation.

Find this tkr blog post about another ankle strengthener exercise interesting? Kindly share…Thanks!

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

This award-winning site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 30+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.

Breaking In a New Shoe Lift

Recently, I found out I needed an additional 3/4” shoe lift on my tkr leg. My legs, as I’ve written about before, are different lengths due to a femur fracture caused by a car accident.

Well, that new shoe lift is really something. The lift is made out of the traditional crepe. When added onto the other 3/4” already on my shoe, it weighs more than the average shoe. A lot more, actually. It’s more like a heavy hiking boot. Yikes. My ankle is paying for it.

Walking with my new shoe lift is a natural ankle strengthening exercise. 🙂 I have to look at it positively, because what’s the good in looking at the opposite? (Not that I haven’t, mind you..) The added weight has caused additional strain upon my ankle. Ouch. Good thing there’s the old standby known as R.I.C.E. Equaling rest, ice, compression and elevation. I wrap up my ankle every night, elevate it on some towels and watch hockey playoffs. Woohoo!!

Thought I’d share this in case others are going through the same thing.

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Allergy Homeopathic Remedy

Here’s another homeopathic remedy that was recently recommended to me. I love cats and was around one for awhile recently. Only after spending some time with the friendly feline did I remember my cat allergy. Actually, my swollen eyes and other symptoms reminded me. 😕 Upon mentioning it to a friend, this remedy was recommended. I tried it, and it works great. So, I thought I’d share it with everyone…

For allergies….
1 teaspoon baking sode
8 ounces water

Mix ingredients together and drink up to four times daily. I have also reduced portions and combined 1/2 t with 4oz water and obtained great results. Concoction also took care of a headache, which was an unexpected surprise.

Enjoy! And remember….if this doesn’t work for you and you get sick….you’re using this remedy at your own risk, not mine..

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