Top 10 Places That Germs Lurk in Your Home

Seeing that people recuperating from a total knee replacement have a compromised immune system, I thought it was appropriate to recirculate this informative article titled ‘Top Ten Places That Germs Lurk in Your Home.’ It is also cold and flu season for everyone. This information has been on WebMD.com, Weather Channel, and other sites.

Got misophobia? You’re not alone. Fear of germs is common and can increase as busy schedules make cleaning time scarce, putting the most fastidious housekeeper on edge. To quell that fear of germs, it helps to know where the germs in your home hide — and the most important places to clean.

While researchers who track germs don’t agree 100%, here are 10 top places where germs lurk in your home- some probably surprising even to Martha Stewart. Let’s also learn how to send the bugs packing.

1. Germs Lurk in Your Home in your Kitchen Sponges
A kitchen sponge can carry more than 134,000 bacteria per square inch, according to a 2007 survey funded by Reckitt Benckiser, the maker of Lysol, and performed by the Hygiene Council. Researchers swabbed 35 U.S. homes for bacteria in 32 different sites.

What makes a sponge so buggy? Using sponges for more than one purpose is common, and people tend to keep their sponges too long, allowing bacteria to multiply, says Kelly Bright, PhD, assistant research scientist at the University of Arizona. “It’s a moist environment, and a sponge is a nice breeding ground.”

Cross-contamination of sponges is common, Bright tells WebMD. You cut raw meat, wipe it up, then prepare another dish and wipe with the same sponge. On a typical sponge you’re likely to find Salmonella (which can cause food-borne illness) and Campylobacter, which can cause diarrhea and abdominal pain, Bright says.

Remedy:
Replace your sponge once a week or so, Bright suggests. Or put it in the dishwasher regularly or soak it in bleach for about 15 minutes. “The dirtier the sponge, the longer you have to soak it to be effective.”

2. Kitchen Sink
Whether empty or full of dishes, the kitchen sink is a germ hot spot, says Bright. “People do a lot of food preparation there,” and that food can lead to contamination, with kitchen drains having more than 500,000 bacteria per square inch, according to the Hygiene Council survey.

Remedy: If you think the last bit of soap suds from washing dishes will take care of things, think again, says Philip Tierno, Jr., PhD, director of clinical microbiology and immunology at Tisch Hospital, New York University Medical Center, and associate professor of microbiology and pathology at NYU School of Medicine.

“Soap doesn’t kill bacteria,” says Tierno, the U.S. representative for the Hygiene Council. His favorite cleaning solution: bleach and water. The FDA suggests kitchen sanitizers or a homemade solution of one teaspoon chlorine bleach in a quart of water, then letting it sit on the surface you’re cleaning for 10 minutes.

3. Germs Lurk in Your Home Here: Faucet Handles
Both bathroom and kitchen faucet handles are germ-catchers. In the Hygiene Council survey, kitchen faucet handles carried more than 13,000 bacteria per square inch and bathroom faucet handles had more than 6,000 bugs per square inch.

Remedy: “Use a disinfectant cleaner spray every time you clean up,” suggests Charles Gerba, PhD, professor of soil, water and environmental science at the University of Arizona, who has researched microbes extensively. In the kitchen, that should be once a day, he says. In the bathroom, at least once a week.

4. Germs Also Lurk in Your Home Here: Home Offices
Surprise: your home office is germier than the typical work office, says Gerba. In a recent study, he compared the average number of bacteria in work and home office to find the numbers of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), which can cause serious skin infections.

In his sampling of 60 home offices and 91 work offices, five sites were tested in each. MRSA was isolated in 15 home offices but no work offices. And overall, more bacteria were found in home offices than work offices. Germiest spots in the home office were the keyboard, mouse, phone, and desktop.

“Probably people eat more in the home office,” Gerba says, partially explaining the larger bug population. “You turn your desk into a bacteria cafeteria.”

Remedy: “Use disinfectant at least once a week” on home office surfaces, suggests Gerba.

5. Toilet Bowl
Not surprisingly, the top germ winner in the Hygiene Council survey was the toilet bowl (but not the seat) with 3.2 million bacteria per square inch. Still, Gerba insists, kitchens are dirtier overall. “There are about 200 times more fecal bacteria on a cutting board,” he says, “than on a toilet seat.”

Remedy: Toilet bowl germs form a biofilm, that slimy layer that develops when bacteria attach to a support such as the bowl, says Tierno. Tackle that film with your chlorine bleach and water solution.

6. Germs Lurk in Your Home Here: Bathtub
Never mind that you think the bubble bath left you and your tub squeaky clean. Lurking near the drain of the bathtub is nearly 120,000 bacteria per square inch, according to calculations made in the Hygiene Council Survey.

Remedy: Give your bathtub a buff with bath cleaner or a chlorine-water cleaning solution mixed up at home.

7. Germs in Your Home: Shower Curtain
The crud or soap scum that collects on your shower curtain probably Sphingomonas and Methylobacterium bacteria,says Norman Pace, PhD, professor of molecular, cellular and developmental biology, University of Colorado, who collected biofilm from four vinyl shower curtains that had been in place more than six months in Boulder-area homes.

They found an abundance of Sphingomonas and Methylobacterium bacteria, and both could pose a problem for people who are immune-compromised, such as those who are HIV positive, or who have other diseases that make them prone to infections.

Remedy: Regular cleaning or replacement of the curtains is advised.

8. Germs in Your Home: Wet Laundry
What are germs doing in your washing machine? Probably contaminating other clothes. A load of just-washed clothes may look sparkling clean, but guess again.

Researchers at the University of Arizona found that intestinal viruses like hepatitis A are readily transferred from contaminated clothes to uncontaminated clothing during the washing.

Remedy: Bleach and drying time. The use of bleach reduced the number of infectious viruses on swatches after washing and drying by nearly 100%, the researchers found. Putting clothes through the drying cycle helped reduce viruses, too, according to Bright, and a hot water wash is good. “If you use the dryer, put it on hot,” she says, to kill remaining germs. And “separate adult clothes from kids’ clothes.”

9. Germs in Your Home: Vacuum Cleaner
It’s supposed to clean, but your vacuum cleaner is also a source of contamination, Gerba tells WebMD. “We looked at 30 vacuum brushes. € Fifty percent contained coliform fecal bacteria and 13% E. coli,” says Gerba. E. coli can cause diarrhea and other health problems. Coliform bacteria don’t typically cause illness, but are often found in the presence of other disease-causing organisms. “Vacuums become meals on wheels” for the bugs, Gerba says.

Remedy: “There’s not much you can do about the brush,” he says. “Vacuum the cleanest areas first and the dirtiest last,” he suggests. That way, you’ll be less likely to spread around as much bacteria. And if you use a bagless vacuum cleaner, wash your hands afterward, since bacteria can remain in the receptacle.

10. Finally, Germs Lurk in Your Home Here: Beds
Mattresses and pillows provide food for dust mites, Tierno tells WebMD, and bedding can also be a reservoir for molds and spores. “In the mattress core there are all sorts of human secretions and excretions,” he says. “Fecal matter as well as sweat and semen.” What’s the problem? “Bedroom debris is probably one of the biggest causes of allergic rhinitis,” Tierno says. “Allergy from dust mites is also a problem.”

Remedy: Place an “impervious” outer cover over the mattresses and pillows, Tierno says, to keep the debris contained. Then wash bedding regularly in water hot enough to kill the bugs.

Hope this information helps you learn more about protecting your health by knowing places where germs lurk in your home.

Find interesting? Kindly share…

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.






How To Fit Exercise Into Your New Year’s Resolution

Hi everyone. The New Year is here and many resolutions involve getting in better shape. I regularly hear how there is no time to exercise. Here are some tried-and-true tips on how to fit exercise into your New Year’s resolution:

Isometrics
These maneuvers involve simply tightening your muscles. Tighten one muscle, like your butt, and hold for a few seconds. Release tension and relax. Repeat with other muscle groups.

Isometrics are particularly helpful when recuperating from a tkr – total knee replacement. Tighten your thigh muscles (quadriceps) to rebuild strength lost by incisions made.

Planks
These dandies give you an all-body workout. Start out by doing only one minute and gradually build up your time and endurance.

Get onto the floor with your arms and legs extended. It’s the position used when doing a push-up. Place your body weight onto your hands and feet. Straighten your elbows. Hold in your stomach (core) muscles. Breathe normally as you hold this position for one minute – or less – to start.

When done correctly you will feel your arms, stomach, shoulders, back, and leg muscles all working in sync.

Stretches
For an excellent back, neck, and leg stretch, stand and gently bend over to touch your toes. Let your head hang freely. Stretch as far as possible. Hold this position for as long as comfortable.

For an easy leg stretch, sit with your legs stretched (extended) in front of you. Keep your heels on the surface, toes pointed toward the ceiling. Gently move your upper body forward until you feel a stretch in your hamstrings (backside of your knee/leg). Hold this position for 10 seconds.

Gently and slowly return to your starting position. Repeat as needed.

Walking
Walking provides a cardiovascular and musculoskeletal workout. Do it at your own pace. Remember to wear comfortable, well-fitted shoes and socks.

Motto of story: Never let lack of time be an excuse for not exercising. The benefits far outweigh the drawbacks. There is always a way. Just find what works for you. The above-mentioned tips on how to fit exercise into your New Year’s resolution are still working for health-conscious individuals.

Find interesting? Kindly share…

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physical-related concerns.

This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.







Early Morning Stretches For A TKR

Hi everyone. I have received some inquiries lately regarding ways to reduce stiffness upon waking in the morning. Seems many of you are like me and need to start using some early morning stretches for a tkr. These are also good for anyone else. So…here are some of my faves that may work equally well for you:

Forward Ankle Stretches
While still laying in bed, gently move your feet so your toes are facing the ceiling. When done correctly, you will feel a stretch in your hamstrings (back of leg).

Hold this favorite of early morning stretches for five seconds. Slowly return to original position.
Repeat as many times as desired.

Toes Away Stretches
Work your upper ankle region by gently pointing your toes away from you. Feel the stretch in your arches, ankle, and tibia areas. Hold for five seconds. Slowly return to original position and repeat as needed.

Ankle Circles
The title is self-explanatory. While still laying in bed, start making circles with your ankles. You can do one at a time or both simultaneously. Do this slowly and gently to avoid undue stress.

All-Body Stretch or Cat’s Meow
Have you watched a cat wake up? The stretch is something to behold.
Do your own by laying on your back in bed. Start by lifting your arms overhead while pointing your toes away from you.

Slowly and gently turn your torso to the left. Hold for a few seconds. Repeat this maneuver to the right side.

When done correctly, this will feel like a natural maneuver that gets the blood flowing.

Hope these exercises are as beneficial for you as for me. Feel free to share any feedback below. 🙂

Find interesting? Kindly share….

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.







Bankruptcy of Purse or Bankruptcy of Life?

Hi everyone! Some of you have asked me for a reprint of this article/post by Sterling Hayden. Due to its popularity, Bankruptcy of Purse or Bankruptcy of Life? has been published on numerous sites over the years. It is written by a sailor for a sailor….Concepts hold true for anyone – whether a landlubber or seafarer…Enjoy….

“To be truly challenging, a voyage, like a life, must rest on a firm foundation of financial unrest. Otherwise, you are doomed to a routine traverse, the kind known to yachtsmen who play with their boats at sea – “cruising” – it is called.

Voyaging belongs to seamen, and to the wanderers of the world who cannot, or will not, fit in. If you are contemplating a voyage and you have the means, abandon the venture until your fortunes change. Only then will you know what the sea is all about.

“I have always wanted to sail to the south seas, but I cannot afford it.” What these men cannot afford is not to go. They are enmeshed in the cancerous discipline of what is termed security. And in the worship of security we fling our lives beneath the wheels of routine and before we know it our lives are gone.

What does a man need, really need? A few pounds of food each day, heat and shelter, six feet to lie down in and some form of working activity that will yield a sense of accomplishment. That is all that is needed in the material sense, and we know it.

But we are brainwashed by our economic system until we end up in a tomb beneath a pyramid of time payments, mortgages, preposterous gadgetry, playthings that divert our attention for the sheer idiocy of the charade.

The years thunder by, The dreams of youth grow dim where they lie caked in dust on the shelves of patience. Before we know it, the tomb is sealed.

Where, then, lies the answer? In choice. Which shall it be: bankruptcy of purse or bankruptcy of life?”

– Sterling Hayden, Author/Actor/Wanderer

This piece is especially in sync with the spirit of Race To Alaska. For more information on this wonderful adventure, feel free to visit:
Race To Alaska

Hope you enjoyed this as much as I have. Find interesting? Kindly share…Thanks!

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.






Simple Ways A Good Diet Changes Your Life For The Better

Hi everyone. I am pleased to present this guest post about how your diet affects your overall lifestyle. Enjoy…

Food is indeed the fuel of life as it is needed in all bodily processes that enables you to think, breathe, move and even feel. All aspects of life are so influenced by what you eat that even the slightest alterations to your diet choices can have a profound effect on your metabolic processes.

To explain how deeply your meals have an effect on your health, below are simple ways showing how a good diet affects your life for the better.

Increased Energy
A deficiency of Vitamins C, B12 and folate can lead to acute fatigue. And when fatigue kicks in, your energy ultimately depletes and create a direct impact on other conditions impacting your health.

By absorbing the necessary vitamins your body requires, you lower the risk of getting vitamin deficiencies and anemia. Sources rich in chlorophyll, essential fatty acids, magnesium, vitamin C and other nutrient-dense foods will help boost energy.

Improved Mood
The lack of nutrients makes your body unable to produce the amount of chemicals it needs to support all metabolic activities. This affects your brain chemistry and can possibly lead to mental health issues like anxiety, depression and other mood disorders. When your body does not get the nutrition it needs, it affects the production of hormones and influences other mood regulators like serotonin.

The typical American diet is rich in fat. Though certain lipids are healthy for you, others like saturated fats can contribute to weight gain and mood problems due to hindered activity of your body’s neurotransmitters caused by an unhealthy diet. Cutting back on refined sugars and processed food can also decrease your chances of depression.

Weight Management
Healthy meals are not just nutrient rich, they also help reduce excess body fat. Along with a slimmer waistline, you also reduce the risk of getting high blood pressure, sleep apnea and diabetes.

Sticking to a high-fat diet does nothing but put your health at risk. It restricts blood flow in your blood vessels and causes heart plaque formation. Good food choices can effectively improve oxygen retention in your blood to help supply the needs of your other major organs.

Reduced Risk of Diseases
Cancer, diabetes, Alzheimer’s disease, heart conditions – these are dreadful diseases that a good nutrition can help prevent. Disregarding the necessary nutrients your body needs can elevate cholesterol and blood sugar levels and can ultimately lead to stroke or diabetes. By eating a diet rich in fiber, fruits and vegetables, you have a better control of your cholesterol and sugar.

Glowing Skin
A diet high in fat usually leads to increased sebum production. Too much sebum can clog some pores and become a breeding ground for bacteria which leads to pimples, acne breakouts, and mottled skin.

Eating a diet rich in good fat such as mono and polyunsaturated fats will help improve your skin’s elasticity and oil production. Eating healthy foods also increases the amount of antioxidants in your body which help fight the signs of aging.

Ginger, turmeric and cinnamon are among the spices that pack the highest antioxidants quantity. Some of them are produced as health supplements to make it easier for people to consume them. You can order turmeric, curcumin and ginger tea online. You can also purchase them in pharmacies and many food and health stores.

Longer Lifespan
Eating a good diet does nothing but improve and extend your quality of life. People with good nutrition are generally happier, healthier and have longer life expectancy due to the absence of diseases and other physical and mental complications that a consistent good diet have brought about.

If you wish to live a longer and healthier life, these simple lifestyle and diet changes will bring about positive results, and making them a habit will have a lasting effect on your life.

Author Bio:

Katrina Rice is a mom and a freelance writer. She strongly believes in the concept of holistic wellness through healthy and natural living, traveling and immersing one’s self in new activities. A self-proclaimed health enthusiast, she hopes to inspire more people to do the same.
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BOOKTOOTS NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns. The site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 30+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.







How To Naturally Heal TKR Scars With Food

Hi everyone. Scars seem to be a common subject among you, my favorite readers. I just got done reading an interesting article on how to best heal scars the natural way. Knowing what a doozy I have (it’s about 10 inches..I haven’t measured it), I thought it would be fun to write a post about how foods can be used to naturally heal a tkr scar.

Personally, I like my tkr scar. It’s healed just fine. Nine years after my total knee replacement surgery, it has blended in well. In part, I believe, is the fact I eat a lot of fresh fruits and vegetables. Food is my healing agent.

Below is some information that provides insight into my reasoning. My data comes from personal experience as well as backup content from the American Dietetic Association. Here goes….

Vitamins that can benefit scar healing are high in antioxidants. The antioxidants are essential for healing of wounds/scars. These include Vitamins C, E and A. I’ll talk about Vitamin C now, for no particular reason other than it’s fresh on my mind. Here goes…

Vitamin C is found in more vegetables than you probably imagine. It is found in dark leafy vegetables such as spinach, mustard greens, collard greens and various dark-colored lettuces (like red leaf). The vitamin is also found in winter squash, green peppers, broccoli, brussel sprouts (or mini-cabbages as some know them) and cabbage varieties.

If you have a sweet tooth (which fruit can satisfy), you’re in luck. Vitamin C is found in berries such as raspberries, blackberries, strawberries, marionberries, blueberries and huckleberries. Citrus fruits like oranges, grapefruit, lemons and limes are also rich in the vitamin.

Mango, watermelon and pineapples are other sources that contain ample amounts to help in skin healing. Snacking on a mango..oohlala! Mixing some fresh fruit into plain yogurt is another option…:)

So you know, I’m talking about the fresh varieties of fruits and vegetables. Personally, I’m not a fan of canned foods, but they do come in handy. One occasion is using them as my minestrone soup base when ripe fresh ones are unavailable.

It’s also nice to have some canned food on hand for emergency power outages or the like. For everyday/consistent eating, though…no. Nothing beats a freshly steamed pot of veggies and serving of protein.

Well, hope this helps others going through the same thing. Take action to start naturally healing any total knee replacement scars. Remember… You are what you eat.

Find interesting? I surely hope so. Kindly share whenever possible…

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

The site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 30+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.







Do You Know Whether You Are Dehydrated or Not? I Didn’t….

Hi everyone! It’s that time of year when warmer temperatures are upon us. It is the heightened season for dehydration. With so much information available, it seems easy to do what is needed. For instance…

I normally drink plenty of fluids. Some may say I’m a fish out of water. 🙂 Anyways, I was recently dehydrated without even knowing it. How did I figure it out? After going to clean my flute out after performing for an hour, I noticed there was no saliva in it. Let me explain..

Normally, when one plays the flute there is a cleaning process afterwards. The cleaning process is needed to remove accumulated saliva from the flute’s interior. If left in place, the saliva can easily penetrate the pads and cause all kinds of trouble. This can lead to pad replacements, impaired sound quality, and an all-around unpleasant experience.

So, after entertaining at a fun gig, I went about my normal post-performance routine of cleaning my instrument before putting it back into its carrying case. The first step is taking the flute apart and looking into the interior chamber. (I like to see all the saliva accumulated. It’s usually an indication of how hard I worked.) Imagine my surprise when I noticed the absolute lack of saliva. Not one drop! In my 50+ years of playing, that has NEVER happened.

The temperatures outside were in the 80’s (and I know you warmer climate folks are chuckling at that..:) ). I do not do well in prolonged exposure to higher temperatures. Still, I was drinking my water.

Throughout my performance I noticed blurred vision, but attributed it to needing newer prescription lenses. It was also more difficult for me to breathe properly. I was catching my breath more than usual. Still, I thought it was just one of those days. (Breathing difficulties are standard procedure for me due to a fractured C-1 from years ago.)

It was only after seeing no saliva in my flute that I realized those symptoms must be related to dehydration. Why else would there be no saliva after a solid hour of playing a wind instrument?

Upon reaching my homestead, I drank enough water to replenish the Pacific Ocean. Plus, the fresh plum, watermelon, and lettuce. Great stuff!

Here are some common dehydration signals to look out for, according to the Mayo Clinic and other sources:

* irritability and/or confusion
* loss of focus, memory, and concentration
* muscle cramps
* lack of urine or very dark urine
* very dry mucous membranes in eyes, nose, and throat
* thirstiness

Hope this helps others going through the same thing. Stay safe!

Find interesting? Kindly share…Thanks!

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns. The site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 30+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.








How Does Some Pistachio Shortbread Sound?

Hi my favorite readers! I don’t know about you, but I LOVE pistachios. It’s always such fun to develop recipes that utilize foods in a different manner. Here is a recipe I developed that put pistachios in a new light…Enjoy!

Pistachio Shortbread

To find the recipe: Simply copy and paste the below link to be taken to my natural foods/living blog. You can also scroll down and find the site listed underneath “My Blogs” on the left sidebar. Thanks!

http://myuniquecookery.blogspot.com

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Resolutionist Time

Hi my favorite readers. Hoping everyone is enjoying a safe and healthy holiday season. It’s coming up to that time of year that we all need to prepare ourselves for. That time is known as “the resolutionist period.” Every January 1 people decide to start getting in shape. That means, that gym memberships rise, trails become crowded and any other number of fitness-oriented activities grow by leaps and bounds.

I am thinking of the pool. If it’s like last year, it’s going to be difficult to find a lap open to swim comfortably in. The locker room will be packed. People will be standing stark naked while talking on the cell phone. Cell phones will be taken into the shower, with conversations echoing off the stall walls. (You read that correctly.) Circle swimming is going to be the protocol for the next three months. BTW…resolutionists usually start to peter out around the three-month period. Getting, and staying, in shape takes hard work and discipline. It’s not for everyone.

Oh boy…I better buy a thicker swim cap to protect against head bumps. I wonder if helmet-wearing is allowed? Seeing that I like to stay on the positive side of things….I will end this post without saying anything else other than asking for an easier resolutionist period than last year’s.

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Moment of Gratitude

Hi my favorite readers! I wanted to take a short moment here and express my gratitude for having such a positive outcome with my total knee replacement.

After reading all the stories and comments posted to this site, I am truly grateful I do not have any horrific stories to share. My recuperation included 8 months of sleep-deprived evenings, horrendous pain while getting my leg back to operating conditions and other bouts of what appears to be standard occurrences.

I may not be able to bend my tkr-affected joint more than about 93 degrees, but I certainly am not complaining. The scar tissues preventing the flexibility are due to 35+ years of accumulating scar tissue. And, no….revisions have NEVER crossed my mind. That is, until now that I’m writing about it. I would much rather deal with inflexibility than go through the revisions, setbacks and other negative situations many of you have experienced. You deserve all the credit in the world for going through such horrendous things.

Anyways, I am truly grateful to be what is known as a “successful tkr recipient.” No medications, in general good health, eating well, exercising regularly and appreciating every day I have. End of story.

Find interesting? Kindly share…thanks!