Living With Severe Neuropathy & a TKR

Hi everyone! I have been receiving numerous inquiries regarding sciatica, nerve pain, and other pains associated with a tkr or total knee replacment. The timing is ideal since I have been experiencing high levels of neuropathy pain. Here’s the scoop that I trust will provide further insight…

As I have written about in other posts that prior to my tkr, bone spurs were digging into my nerves. They were severing my nerves. (The nerves are located alongside the lateral portion of my knee.)

Prior to my tkr, I had to readjust my entire body in order to compensate for this extreme pain.

What is interesting is that almost 10 years post-tkr, this neuropathy pain can be excruciating at times. I know that my situation could be much worse, but believe it
is worthy of sharing with you.

The level of discomfort is simply noticeable and potentially hindering. I do not know when it will happen. It is unpredictable.

There are times when the neuropathy leads to my entire tkr leg tingling. Sometimes there is pain, other times there is not. It is the strangest feeling.

Right now, I am sitting at a computer using proper ergonomics, and I feel my lower leg tingling all the way down to the ends of my toes. I straighten my leg and the tingling diminishes. Other times I straighten my leg and the tingling continues.

I always like to pay particular attention to activities happening when the pain and/or tingling occur. I do notice that the neuropathy pain occurs when lifting any amount of weight. Even carrying some grocery bags does this.

It sometimes happens when I am swimming. It can happen when standing for more than 5-10 minutes. These are just some situations that pop into my mind as I am writing this article.

How do I ease the pain? I try my best to find stress-reducing body positions. Some work one time and not another. I lightly massage the area. This provides temporary relief, usually.

There are several yoga stretches that help, like the pyramid pose. Touching toes, downward-facing dog, and camel pose all provide relief, also.

And: Elevating my leg works some times, not all the time. In short, my remedies provide unpredictable results. I take aspirin, but dread popping pills for a number of reasons.

Hope this helps others going through the same thing. Find interesting? Kindly share with others who may benefit. Thank you!

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.






Knee Braces & A TKR

Hi everyone. Some of you have asked me if I have tried using a knee brace prior to having a tkr (total knee replacement). The answer is “yes”. Here is my story about knee braces and a tkr…

Prior to my total knee replacement, I tried everything I could to avoid the pain. One thing I did was wear a knee brace. It was painful and I didn’t understand why. That is, until I saw an x-ray of my knee.

I had bone spurs on each side of my knee that had developed due to my knee being bone-on-bone. I have written other blog posts about my bone spurs. Here is some more insight…

A knee brace stabilizes the knee joint by compressing the muscles. I can see how a brace would work for many people with knee concerns. However, the muscle compression caused my bone spurs to dig into my nerves more than usual. That compression, in turn, resulted in increased pain.

The knee brace did keep my knee joint better aligned. I can see why many people find them helpful. Knee braces may be great for others, but they did not work for me. It just goes to show that everyone is different. You may be the same.

Hope this insight helps others going through the same thing.

Find interesting? Kindly share with others…

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.







TKR Nerve Damage: Some Helpful Insight

Hi everyone. Many of you have been contacting me about dealing with tkr nerve damage, so thought I would pitch in. My feedback is based on personal experience. As I have mentioned before, over the years my body developed very noticeable bone spurs on each side of my left knee. This knee was finally replaced in my total knee replacement surgery.

The bone spurs looked like quite noticeable hooks. Picture a hook that holds towels, chains, etc and you get the idea. These hooks dug into my nerves every time I moved. They severed the nerves, causing them to severely shred. Technically speaking, this is known as severe neuropathy. Anyways, here some insight about my tkr nerve damage….

There are extended times when the pain is either completely unnoticeable or slightly uncomfortable. When I swim, the pain is almost nonexistent – most of the time. In fact, I had gone for so long without any nerve damage pain, I forgot that the possibility was there.

Then, I attended a workout known as Body Pump. The workout can be adjusted to individual preferences. I chose to use very light weights of five pounds.

The workout consists of squats, pushups, planks, arm lifts, and other maneuvers that result in a whole-body set. Motions go from slow to fast-paced. It is a versatile workout program. Movements can be modified to suit individual needs.

My squats were very shallow. Part of that was due to having decreased tkr mobility. I have a 93-degree bend in my knee. I did wall push-ups so I didn’t have to get onto the floor for the standard version. No problem. None of the arm maneuvers were a concern. I felt very good after the workout.

The next day was another story. My nerves were sending loud and clear messages. It is now a month afterwards, and I still have the remnants of overdoing it. I know it could be much worse, but it is an annoyance.

I hope this helps others going through the same thing involving tkr nerve damage. I must reiterate, the nerve damage is not caused by the total knee replacement surgery. My tkr did not fix the neuropathy, either.

Find interesting? Kindly share….

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

The site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 30+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.






Does Your TKR Involve Nerve Damage?

Hi everyone…It’s been 6.75 years since my tkr and I’ve received a number of inquiries about how my knee is doing and what others can expect.

As I’ve mentioned before, everyone recuperates at their own pace. My tkr knee still looks a little “fatter” than my other knee. Depending upon the level of my physical activity, sometimes it just swells up more than usual. It’s usually not painful.

What is painful, however, is the extensive nerve damage left behind from my bone spurs. Bone spurs developed on each side of my knee to the point where they were digging into my nerves. I was told the tkr would not correct the nerve damage, but would make the knee pain go away. I was fine with that.

This pain is exacerbated by swimming, but I don’t care. I’d rather have pain than no swimming.
In addition to the swimming times, this nerve pain can happen anywhere, any time. There does not seem to be any rhyme nor reason. The pain always runs from my lower spine down the side of my tkr leg.

Some times the pain goes along with a tingling sensation that goes from my knee down to my ankle. It’s a strange feeling. The tingling shows up sporadically and unexpectedly.

The pain and tingling will go away when my leg is elevated and resting. Ice helps and so does aspirin. Gentle side bends and toe touches also help alleviate some of the pain. Dealing with this pain is no big deal to me. It’s 100-percent better than the complete knee pain I had prior to my tkr.

Hope this helps others going through the same thing.

Find interesting? Kindly share…Thanks!

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns. The site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 30+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.






A Real-Life Story About Nerve Damage, a Shoe Lift, and TKR

Hi everyone! I’ve had a number of inquiries lately regarding nerve pain associated with a total knee replacement, so I wanted to share a recent story in an attempt to help others out…

It was a beautiful sunny day. After just finishing a tasty fundraising breakfast, going home just didn’t sound like a good idea. I was wearing business casual clothing, including my walking shoes. (As I have discussed in other posts on this site, my left shoe has a 1.75” shoe lift on it).

I hopped into the car and decided to go for a nice drive. There’s a beautiful waterfront community nearby that I knew had benches that provided a wonderful view. There’s where I was headed.

As I was approaching the town, I noticed signs stating a festival was taking place. “Oh, oh”, I thought. Parking is difficult enough as it is in that area, let alone during a festival. Anyways, I proceeded.

Someone (as usual) was watching over me that day, since ONE parking spot was available in an ideal location. My parallel parking skills came in handy. 🙂

After taking in the scenery while sitting on the waterfront bench for a bit, I decided to partake in the festivities. It was a medieval faire. WHAT A BLAST!!

However, to tie this in with my tkr and shoe lift story, the majority of festivities took place on open grounds containing uneven land. My ankle and shoe lift were getting an interesting workout! Without any ankle support (like my standard hiking boots provide), my shoe lift walking abilities were put to the test. There’s no point in getting frustrated about it. That’s what happens when one wears a shoe lift. It’s very easy to lose your balance or twist your ankle. Yikes…

I’m not going to complain about anything. I am very grateful for the opportunity, experienced wonderful things, and met fantastic people. I’d do it again in a second!

Let me just say…nothing looked more inviting than my sofa when I got home. I was going to shower, eat, and become a couch potato while watching game 7 of the NHL Playoffs, The nerve damage caused by my since-removed bone spurs was exacerbated. That’s an understatement. 🙂

My tkr scar was bright red (still can’t figure that one out). Both of my ankles were swollen. And my tkr knee was slightly swollen. Remember…I’m 6.5 years post-tkr.

How did I handle all of that? I relaxed, did some slow stretches, ate, took two aspirins, and elevated my leg.

That’s what happens when a shoe lift wearer walks on uneven land for a prolonged period of time. Not complaining, just providing insight that can hopefully help others.

NOTE TO SELF: Carry hiking boots in the car trunk at all times.

Find interesting? Kindly share…Thanks!

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns. The site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 30+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.








More Nerve Damage, Bone Spur & TKR Insight

Hi my favorite readers! Recently, I have received a number of comments regarding nerve damage after a tkr. I have written about this previously, as in the post below, but wanted to provide yet another update. The update involves my personal experience. My nerve damage was caused prior to my tkr. Remember, your experience may be different..and probably is. Anyways…here goes:

The nerve damage pain caused from a former bone spur is unpredictable. Sometimes it flares up after swimming and sometimes it does not. I have noticed that when I extensively use my legs during the paddling process, the pain exacerbates quickly. Sometimes the pain is so intense that I need to bite my tongue to walk into the locker room. Sometimes the pain is simply an annoyance.

When the pain does flare up, I notice that doing some upper torso turns provides a natural way to reduce pain levels. The exercise involves keeping my upper body facing straight ahead while my lower body turns from right to left. Or rather, I turn my body in those directions. 🙂

What I find interesting is over the years, I have noticed that the nerves alongside my knee seem to be attached to the lower portion of my spinal column. Knee-to-chest exercises also work well to reduce pain levels. Rarely does the nerve pain extend to my ankle.

Well, thought I’d share the information to help others going through the same thing.

Find interesting? Kindly share…Thanks!






Knee Braces & A TKR

Prior to my total knee replacement, I tried everything I could to avoid the pain. One thing I did was wear a knee brace. It was painful and I didn’t understand why. That is, until I saw an x-ray of my knee.

I had bone spurs on each side of my knee that had developed due to my knee being bone-on-bone. I have written other blog posts about my bone spurs. They just need to be discussed in this article since they play a major role.

A knee brace stabilizes the knee joint by compressing the muscles. I can see how a brace would work for many people with knee concerns. However, the muscle compression caused my bone spurs to dig into my nerves more than usual. That is what caused the pain from wearing a knee brace.

Knee braces may be great for others, but they sure did not work for me. It just goes to show that everyone is different.

Hope this helps others going through the same thing.

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Living With Double Vision

Hi everyone. Part of the reason I have not posted in a few days is the fact I’ve been involved in scheduling an eye surgery. Of course this involves eye appointments. Holy Mackerel. As grateful as I am for everything, by the time the eye exam is done…I just want to sleep. 🙂

A couple of weeks ago I finally received a diagnosis I could understand. See…34 years ago I was in a car accident in which I experienced numerous injuries. One was a closed head injury that was a result of my head hitting the dashboard and going through the windshield. This head trauma caused a weak muscle and damaged nerve in my left eye. I was told then that I would have diplopia (double vision) for the rest of my life. This diplopia originally started on my right lateral.

For years I needed to be super careful about what I ate and drank. I wore regular eyeglasses. I noticed that if I consumed caffeine or too much salt, my diplopia worsened. It also worsened when I’d eat anything with MSG (monosodium glutamate) in it. (Remember, this is before MSG was the health concern that it is today. In fact, it was sold in the spice section of grocery stores. I loved the stuff and was disheartened when I realized I could not eat it. 🙁 ) I noticed that when my hormones were unbalanced, so was my diplopia. As time as progressed, I find it very interesting that whenever I have told an eye professional like a M.D. or D.O. (or whatever the initials for an optometrist are) about the effects of foods and/or hormones on my diplopia (and there have been many times)….they find it entertaining and treat it lightly. They cannot believe anything like that effects my condition. Hmm…I wonder if a naturopath or acupuncturist would. ?? Just curious.

I didn’t know about eye glass prisms until 8 years ago. I don’t know if prisms existed back in the late 1970’s. I wasn’t made aware of them if they were. They’re great. I can see straight. That is until about six months ago. My diplopia has affected all of my visual fields. Now…I see double even while wearing my glasses. And, my prism cannot get much stronger.

The diagnosis…after the completion of my eye exam, my ophthalmologist told me I have a nerve palsy affecting the nerve surrounding my cerebellum.. As she described the nerve, its location sounded perfectly aligned with where my head injury occurred. I was impressed. Impressed, yet scared. Suddenly I have a palsy. Isn’t it funny how you can live with a condition for so long and just learn to deal with it and suddenly when it’s given a name ….it’s viewed differently? I find that interesting, anyways.

So..instead of wearing glasses that will look abnormal and accentuate my vision defect, I am going to have the surgery. I thought I wasn’t vain, but I don’t want to wear glasses with tape and stripes across the entire lens. My diplopia has reached the point where I want it fixed. I just want to see straight (or as straight as possible) when I open my eyes in the morning. Plus, I want the headaches and overall tiredness to stop. Eye problems are a physiological strain upon the body. And…that’s an understatement.
So…that’s the scoop. Thanks for reading.

Hope this helps anyone else going through the same thing.

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Decreased Nerve Damage & A TKR

For the first 13 months after my total knee replacement, I had severe nerve pain on the outer portion of my tkr leg. I wrote about this previously and found out that it seems to be a pretty common occurrence after undergoing this surgery.

Well, something surprising has happened within the last month. This nerve pain is 95% gone. I am not woke up at night from this sharp pain. I can move my leg in different ranges without any pain. And, I do not have to wait a bit upon standing in order to have my nerve ‘position’ itself properly. This is interesting to me.

I would like to attribute it to the fact that I exercise diligently. When riding my upright bicycle, I notice my nerve is also getting a workout. I can feel it move along side my tkr joint. It does not hurt, but seems to be stretching out. That is how it feels to me, anyways.

If I am not riding my upright bike, I using walking as my exercise. Not only does this help my all around health, but my tkr leg loves it. My nerve is not painful at all while I do this. It used to be.

Even though I may have written about how excited I was about not having this severe nerve damage pain anymore….I’m doing it again since it is such a remarkable improvement.

I am sure I still have nerve damage (I don’t think it ever heals itself…does it?) but perhaps the holistic treatment of exercise and time has diminished it profoundly.

I don’t have a definitive answer other than whatever it is….I hope it continues!

Hope this helps others going through the same thing.

(To Murphy: Please don’t follow me after this post. I’m crossing my fingers. )

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Bones Spurs and a Total Knee Replacement

Prior to my total knee replacement, I was experiencing great pain on the outer portion of my “bad knee”. It seemed that a nerve was being pinched causing pain to shoot from my knee down to my ankle. Sometimes it was so painful, I needed crutches to walk.

After having x-rays taken, it turns out that my knee had developed bone spurs. Bone spurs were formed by my knee being bone-against-bone. They looked like hooks. In turn, these bone spurs were digging into my tissues and muscles. Bone spurs are known to cause nerve damage, and they were proving their point with me. I had, and still have, extensive nerve damage due to them.

Fast forward….Even though my bone spurs were removed during my total knee replacement surgery, I still experience pain due to the nerve damage caused by them. The pain is less severe than prior to my tkr, but it is still there. Sometimes it is worse than at other times. Oh well, that’s life. It could be much worse.

I thought I’d mention it since there are probably others experiencing the same thing.

Find interesting? Kindly share…Thanks!