Carrying Things Upstairs After A TKR

Sharing personal insight into carrying things upstairs after a tkr – total knee replacement.

Hi everyone. It’s always nice to hear from you. Recently, I have received many inquiries about carrying things upstairs after a tkr – total knee replacement. Throughout my tkr recuperation I looked for ways to make climbing stairs easier and more manageable. Here is my personal insight worth sharing on my tkr blog…

Upon entering the house, I place all bags onto the stair’s base level (floor). I then walk up one stair at a time. I reach down and pick up the bags with one hand, grab onto the rail with my other hand, then swing the bags (no..there’s no eggs involved) onto the stair 2-3 higher.

This tkr blogger repeats this process until I reach the entry door.

I  discovered this process after numerous times of carrying all the bags in both hands while ascending the staircase. This was difficult. The bags seemed heavy. Then when I’d get to the top of the tkr stairs (SEO phrase), I’d be sweaty and out of breath. Plus, my language would not have made my mother proud. 🙁

Where’s Popeye? He could do anything. I bet he would make carrying things upstairs after a tkr seem like a breeze.  🙂

Hope this helps anyone else going through the same thing.

Find interesting and helpful? Kindly share…

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout the pre-op, recuperation and beyond stages. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physical concerns.

This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.

7 Ways to Speed Up Your Knee Replacement Recuperation

Hi my favorite readers. Many of you have approached me recently inquiring about ways to make the tkr recuperation easier. There is no simple approach, unfortunately. Sharing one of my more popular posts regarding this topic may help you. Good luck!

Having a total knee replacement surgery is only part of the process. Always remember that. How you deal with the recuperation to actually use your new knee is another part. It, actually, is the hardest part. Only you can determine the extent of your success.

  • Here are some ways I have noticed an improvement in my total knee replacement recuperation. My knee is getting better every day because of them. They may work for you. Here goes…

    * Every hour on the hour, get up and walk around. Even if it is for only a couple of minutes. You need to stand up and get your blood flowing. Your level of recuperation (and physical therapist) will determine whether you use a walking aide or not.

  • *Do as much as you can for yourself. Lower your reliance on others when you can easily do it yourself. You will only be hurting yourself.
  • *Know that it will be painful. You cannot get around having pain after a major surgery. Bummer.

    *Take a pain med prior to your exercise. I find that ½ hour beforehand works best for me. This will help make your exercise regimen go easier. Of course, your pain meds will decrease as time goes on and your level of recuperation increases. The sooner the better, I say.

    *Set a goal for your knee flexibility. Find a ‘hash mark’ on the floor that you want to stretch your foot to. Lift your leg farther than an earlier attempt. Your physical therapist can help with this.

    *Keep icing. After every exercise bout, ice your knee area. The best is a simple ice pack. Or, frozen peas and carrots work well.:)

    *Elevate. Keep your leg elevated when not exercising. This helps the healing.

    Recuperating from a total knee replacement takes work, time and effort. Stay with it and you will only benefit. Remember to check back here often to realize that you are not alone.

    Find interesting? Kindly share…

    AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

    This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.







    Walking Sticks and A TKR

    Hi everyone. Recently, I have heard quite a bit about how helpful walking sticks were for exercise purposes. Some of you have asked me about them, also. So, I have used them on some of my daily walks. They were OK, but not something I would want to use regularly. They did come in handy on another event, though…

    Scenario:
    It was during a hike. The expedition was originally presented to me as a 5-mile round-trip beach walk. No problem, I thought. Hah!! It turned into a 8-9 mile round-trip walk in the woods, going through old growth forests. (I think the technical term is backwoods.)

    One of my hiking companions had a couple of walking sticks. She was praising the benefits of the sticks and swore she wouldn’t go hiking without them. Her ankles were giving her problems. Plus, she mentioned how the sticks helped her balance.

    When I asked her how they worked, she gave a demonstration. She put the stick down into the ground and it went all the way down to the handle. See…parts of this trail were big time mud traps. It was a hilarious sight, and I burst out laughing. Luckily…she was not hurt and did not fall.

    A while later, another portion of the hike involved going down a muddy trail. When she offered one of her sticks, I took her up on it. I am glad I did. There was no way I could have made it down that decline without the aid of the stick. The stick kept me from falling and definitely game me support.

    Moral: Getting used to the walking stick was the hard part. Once this hurdle is overcome, it really is an asset to have around. It has come in handy on numerous occasions, other than hiking.

    Conclusion:
    So, for anyone interested in using a walking stick after a tkr..I highly recommend it. I’m not getting paid to say this or writing any reviews. This handy device just makes walking and hiking so much easier, especially on questionable terrains.

    Hope this helps others going through the same thing.

    Find interesting? Kindly share…

    AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

    This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.







    How To Lower Your Risks of Falling

    Tips on How to lower your risks of falling

    Hi my favorite readers! While recuperating, and preparing, for a total knee replacement it is important to prepare your living area to help avoid falls. Here are some helpful tips on how to lower your risks of falling. They apply for everyone, not just a total knee replacement person.

    This is also an excerpt from my ebook titled…”Preparing for a Total Knee Replacement”.

    * Remove all loose rugs that do not have a nonstick backing. If possible, duct tape the rugs to the floor – if desired.

    * Remove all loose rugs, period. Sometimes, depending on your balance, crutches and walkers will have a hard time getting around the edges of loose rugs.

    * Remove all cords from the floor. If you don’t remove them, make certain that you can maneuver around them without causing any distress.

    I have known people who didn’t look down while walking and tripped over cords that easily could have been avoided had they watching where they were walking. 

    * Be careful and aware of your surroundings. It is crucial for fall prevention.

    * Watch out for small animals. They have a tendency to run under your feet quickly and without warning.

    * I recommend not having any small animals (considered hazards) around for the first week after surgery. Do your part in fall prevention and total knee replacement instances.

    * Don’t reach for anything above your head.  It is too easy to lose your balance this way.

    * Don’t drink alcohol. If you simply must have it, consume minimal amounts. This is common sense, but it does affect one’s balance.

    * Don’t lean to either side while on your crutches or walker. Keep your body weight evenly positioned. Remember to keep a square, safe reach area around you. Again, you will lose your balance too easily if you don’t.

    It is easy to avoid falling while recuperating from a total knee replacement if you prepare both yourself and home beforehand. Be successful by using these how to tips. All are tried and true.

    Hope this helps others going through the same thing.

    Find interesting? Kindly share…Thanks!

    AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

    This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.






    How To Find Motivation to Exercise After A TKR

    Hi everyone. Usually, it is easy to back out of exercising. Many people continually make excuses about why they don’t exercise. However, I want to share some great ways on how to find motivation to exercise after a tkr. Read on…

    Be diligent in doing your exercises while recuperating from your total knee replacement and you will get excited about what used to be difficult when moving your body. Why? You will reap your rewards. Here’s my take on the issue….

    * You will love how thrilling it is to be able to walk without pain.

    * It is great to have what is known as a ‘normal’ walking gait without walking aides.

    * It is fantastic to be able to walk fast enough to get out of breath and work up a sweat. (To some this would be “speed walking”. I like to think of it as walking faster than I did prior to my tkr.)

    * It is wonderful to be able to walk trails, take in the scenery, and smell the air without feeling any joint pain.

    * It is a nice feeling knowing that you are getting the most out of your total knee replacement surgery.

    * It is so welcoming to have clothes fit better. I know, in my case, there were times when my dryer shrunk too many clothes. 😕

    All of these combine to provide motivation in staying with, or starting, an exercise program.

    Hope this helps you get motivated to exercise after your tkr (or any time, for that matter).

    Always remember to be grateful you can walk.

    Find interesting? Kindly share…
    AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

    This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.







    Stairs as a Knee Replacement Exercise

    Hi everyone. When working on gaining flexibility in your knee, a great exercise is to walk up and down stairs. Going up is much easier than going down.

    Part of the recuperation process after a total knee replacement involves a variety of exercises involving stairs or steps.

    The first movement in my case was to simply stand up and lift my leg onto a step. I say simply, but it was definitely not easy. It took all the energy I had. (TKR surgery involves cutting through the quadricep muscle, the largest muscle in your leg.)

    Then, lift our body weight onto your tkr leg.

    Place your “good” leg onto the step/stair.

    Hold this position for five seconds.

    Return to the original position.

    Rest for 10 seconds.

    Repeat five times. Slowly increase your time and repetitions.

    Do this maneuver with the aid of crutches, at first. Then, eventually, all that will needed is the aid of railings or parallel bars.

    It is not easy, but once it starts working out….it’s great. Hard work pays off.

    NOTE: You may want to start this exercise by placing your tkr leg onto a step, lifting your body up until your knee is straight, and then lowering yourself back to the original position.

    AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

    This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.







    10 Natural Ways to Prepare for Total Knee Replacement Surgery

    Hi everyone! We all know the importance of keeping everything as natural as possible during the entire total knee replacement process. Here is a guest post written by a tkr patient, Tamara Lujan, a 27-year practitioner of herbal and holistic healing. Below find 10 natural ways to prepare for total knee replacement surgery.

    Nine weeks ago, at age 53, I had total knee replacement surgery. Some health issues and past surgeries placed me at higher risk for infection, skin tissue breakdown & blood clots. I decided to use natural treatments, dietary changes and herbs, to help ensure an easier recovery; reduce the risks of infection and inflammation; and help prevent blood clots.

    As a holistic health practitioner I want people to be proactive in their health and total knee replacement surgery is no exception. I personally started by researching doctors and hospitals, finding information on everything from a doctors success rates to hospital infection percentages. I also began working on having my body in the best possible health prior to surgery.

    1. Eliminate alcohol – Alcohol increases the risks of complications and slows down the recovery process.

    2. Water – Water boosts your immune system, flushes toxins and helps keep you regular. I recommended about 90 ounces a day for women and 120 ounces for men.

    3. Turmeric Extract – Turmeric is a powerhouse for fighting inflammation. Turmeric extract is an easy way to get the dosage you need.

    4. Nettle Leaf Infusion – Dried Nettle leaves are a wonderful source of nutrients and are high in essential minerals including iron, calcium, potassium and magnesium. Nettle infusion is a miracle working when it comes to inflammation. It has worked wonders on my fibromyalgia and arthritis. It is approved by the German Commission E for reducing inflammation.

    5. Nettle Seed Extract – Fighting chronic pain is exhausting. Nettle seed helps build your energy in the short term. Take up to 1 week prior to surgery.

    6. Shiitake Mushrooms – at least 2 x a week (great in Miso soup!). This mushroom helps prevent thrombosis. Discontinue using 2 weeks prior to surgery.

    7. Seaweed – 2 x a week. I put this in my Miso, on salads or simply to snack on. Helps prevent inflammation. Discontinue using 2 weeks prior to surgery.

    8. Homeopathic Arnica Montana 30x – Used to reduce bruising, swelling and joint pain. Discontinue use 1 week prior to surgery.

    9. QUERCETIN with BROMELAIN – to help build immune system and for reducing inflammation. Speak with your doctor as to recommendation on use beyond 2 weeks prior to surgery.

    10. Improve your muscles and body systems – Try yoga, massage and acupuncture. These can help limber you up, reduce inflammation, and keep the lymphatic and blood system flowing.

    My knee surgery went great. Based on the damage to my knee and a pre-op ROM of just 68 degrees, everyone was very surprised at my recovery and that in just 7 weeks post-op, I was at a 100 degree ROM!

    *Please let your doctor and pharmacist know of any herbal and supplements you are taking.

    Author Bio:
    Tamara Lujan is a holistic health practitioner and herbalist with over 27 years of experience. She believes in a holistic approach to healing, which includes using whole foods and herbs to help the body heal and perform at its best. Visit Tamara at Farmacology Organics.

    Find interesting? Kindly share…Thanks!
    *****
    AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

    This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physical conditions for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.








    How to Get the Most Out of Physical Therapy After Knee Replacement Surgery

    Hi everyone. With so much information available knowadays about getting the most out of your total knee replacement, I thought it would be worthwhile to share a guest post written by the experts at The Joint Replacement Therapists. I am certain this insight about physical therapy after knee replacement surgery is the key to your success. Enjoy…
    *****
    Physical therapy is an integral part to any individual’s knee replacement recovery. There are thousands of physical therapists and physical therapy clinics throughout the country, and the majority of physical therapists are professional, knowledgeable, and caring.

    Your therapists will provide you with all the information and resources you require to have a successful knee replacement. What you get out of your rehab after surgery will be a direct reflection of what you put into it.

    With that being said, we’d like to share our advice for how to get the most out of your physical therapy after your knee replacement surgery.

    Start Before Surgery

    Rehab begins before surgery. This is known as prehab or preoperative rehab. Numerous studies have shown the benefits of physical therapy and physical training before surgery. Individuals who train and exercise before knee replacement surgery have better range of motion, strength, and overall function after the surgery.

    This leads to a quicker recovery. (See our blog post titled: What is Prehab? )

    Learn About Pain

    Pain is complex and many factors in your life contribute to pain including physical, social, psychological, emotional, and environmental. The more you can learn about the contributors to pain, the more you’ll be able to make positive lifestyle changes to manage the pain effectively.

    Understand the Process and Have Patience

    Recovery takes time. You may only notice small improvements initially, and that is okay. The average course of outpatient physical therapy can last 12-16 weeks, but you may not experience 100% recovery for up to 6 months. Keep doing all the right things and eventually it will pay off with a great recovery and outcome.

    Follow Instructions

    Everything your physical therapist tells you is for a reason. Any instructions we provide is based off the goal of you having a full and positive recovery with no avoidable setbacks.

    Ask Questions

    Your physical therapists, and all the healthcare professionals, are there to help you. Do not feel intimidated to ask any and all questions. Being well-informed and knowledgeable regarding all aspects of your recovery will only benefit you more. There are no stupid questions.

    Be Consistent

    You won’t notice much change in strength or range of motion after just one therapy session. However, if you remain consistent with your exercises and activities, and regularly attend therapy, little by little you will see the fruits of your labors.

    Consider Your Complete Health

    Many factors play a role in your recovery after knee replacement surgery. Consider all aspects of your health and determine where you can make some positive changes. Consider things like nutrition, sleep, emotional health, mental health and more.

    Continue After Therapy Ends

    Your recovery does not stop once you are discharged from physical therapy. It is important to continue with all the exercises you learned in physical therapy and perform them on a regular basis.

    It is also important to find ways to maintain the health of your knee and whole body. Great activities to try include walking, aquatic exercises, yoga, and much more.

    About the Authors

    The Joint Replacement Therapists, Doctors Jordan and Luke Pedersen, are two physical therapists and the founders of the Joint Replacement Therapists website at The Joint Replacement Therapists.

    Jordan and Luke are orthopedic therapists who have worked with many individuals before and after joint replacement surgery.

    They realized the shortcomings with a lot of the educational material available to individuals considering joint replacement surgery. The Joint Replacement Therapists strive to provide thorough evidence-based information in an organized manner for individuals considering or planning joint replacement surgery.

    Their hopes are the information gained will help decrease patient anxieties and improve confidence regarding the entire joint replacement process.
    ***************

    Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

    Booktoots’ Healing site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 30+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.







    What Exactly Does “Pain Med” Mean?

    Personal insight into what “pain med” actually means.

    Hi everyone. After almost three months of recuperating from a total knee replacement surgery, I have finally figured out what is meant by “pain med”. At first, I thought it meant that the medications were supposed to alleviate pain completely. That just was not so. What exactly does “pain med” mean?

    In fact, no matter what type I was given, there was still pain. Sometimes the pain was unbearable. It always existed in some form. So, I resigned myself to the fact that a pain med just doesn’t work.

    Then, I ran out. I didn’t think it as any big deal. Usually, I took one pain med one-half hour before my pt or exercise.   Well, this time I just went for a walk thinking “What’s the use of a pain med, anyways? The term is joke.” Wow….what a difference! The pain was intense after finishing my exercise routine. I could hardly move my leg.

    So, the verdict is….pain meds help take the edge off of pain. They decrease the pain intensity. They do not totally eliminate pain, as some (like me) would think.

    Find interesting? Kindly share…

    AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

    This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.







    How To Fit Exercise Into Your New Year’s Resolution

    Hi everyone. The New Year is here and many resolutions involve getting in better shape. I regularly hear how there is no time to exercise. Here are some tried-and-true tips on how to fit exercise into your New Year’s resolution:

    Isometrics
    These maneuvers involve simply tightening your muscles. Tighten one muscle, like your butt, and hold for a few seconds. Release tension and relax. Repeat with other muscle groups.

    Isometrics are particularly helpful when recuperating from a tkr – total knee replacement. Tighten your thigh muscles (quadriceps) to rebuild strength lost by incisions made.

    Planks
    These dandies give you an all-body workout. Start out by doing only one minute and gradually build up your time and endurance.

    Get onto the floor with your arms and legs extended. It’s the position used when doing a push-up. Place your body weight onto your hands and feet. Straighten your elbows. Hold in your stomach (core) muscles. Breathe normally as you hold this position for one minute – or less – to start.

    When done correctly you will feel your arms, stomach, shoulders, back, and leg muscles all working in sync.

    Stretches
    For an excellent back, neck, and leg stretch, stand and gently bend over to touch your toes. Let your head hang freely. Stretch as far as possible. Hold this position for as long as comfortable.

    For an easy leg stretch, sit with your legs stretched (extended) in front of you. Keep your heels on the surface, toes pointed toward the ceiling. Gently move your upper body forward until you feel a stretch in your hamstrings (backside of your knee/leg). Hold this position for 10 seconds.

    Gently and slowly return to your starting position. Repeat as needed.

    Walking
    Walking provides a cardiovascular and musculoskeletal workout. Do it at your own pace. Remember to wear comfortable, well-fitted shoes and socks.

    Motto of story: Never let lack of time be an excuse for not exercising. The benefits far outweigh the drawbacks. There is always a way. Just find what works for you. The above-mentioned tips on how to fit exercise into your New Year’s resolution are still working for health-conscious individuals.

    Find interesting? Kindly share…

    AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physical-related concerns.

    This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.