recuperation

Natural Edible Sleep Aides To Help Your TKR

Hi everyone. As we all know, sleeping is difficult while recuperating from a total knee replacement. Did you know that you can use some natural edible sleep aides to help your tkr recuperation?

Once the extreme pain lessens, foods can actually be used as natural edible sleep aides to help with your tkr recuperation. They can make a difference. They did – and still do – for me, anyways. I share my firsthand experiences to help others going through the same thing.

We all of these, experiment with different things to make sleep come easier. This is how I found out about the foods mentioned below. This combined with some research – both online and offline – set the foundation for sweet dreams.

Be aware, though, natural foods are not miracle cures. Your body has to digest the foods before you receive any benefits. (I know that’s common sense, but I had to say it.) Not all foods work for all people. We are unique individuals with unique physiologies.

Whether it is tryptophan, magnesium, protein, calcium, carbohydrates, potassium, or vitamin B6 – there is something for everyone here. So…here goes:

BANANAS
These are my favorite. A perfectly ripe banana does the trick every time. The potassium eases any pain involved, making it a surefire hit on the list of natural sleep aides. For an extra kick, mix one into some yogurt and enjoy.

YOGURT and DAIRY
Warm milk has been a natural sleep remedy since great grandmother’s youth. Any dairy product works well, though. My favorite is plain yogurt.

Plain yogurt not only settles the digestive system, the calcium helps release tryptophan into the body. According to researchers, the brain uses tryptophan to manufacture melatonin.

LEAFY GREENS
Try eating a handful of leafy greens before going to bed. I like munching on them by themselves. You may be different, though.

Leafy greens include red, butter, iceberg, romaine, kale, spinach, Or, make a simple tea by steeping some greens in hot water for two minutes. Let cool for a bit and drink.

NUTS
Enjoy a serving of walnuts, which contain noticable amounts of tryptophan. Put some on a green salad for an extra taste treat before hitting the hay.

Almonds are known for being magnesium sources. Magnesium has a reputation for being increasing sleep quality. I like eating about five whenever needed.

That’s all I can think of for now for foods that can be used as natural sleep aides. Do you have any food suggestions to share about holistic healing?

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AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

This award-winning site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author, tkr blogger, and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.

Marie is also a proud WEGO Health Patient Leader.

TKR Dead Weight: Is This You?

Hi everyone! I have received quite a few comments lately about the worries of having a very stiff and “nonfunctional” tkr (total knee replacement) leg for a time after the surgery.  Here’s some more insight about tkr dead weight: is this you?

Unexpected happening. My entire leg was a complete dead weight after surgery. I was not prepared for this aspect. No one told me about it, either. Nor did I read it in any tkr literature. None of my leg muscles were working (except my ankle and hamstrings).

Front stretching needed. My tkr knee needed gentle stretching exercises to increase the bend along the front part of my new knee.

Manually lift. Plus, I needed to manually lift my leg up onto sitting/laying surfaces. I used a towel or my hands to do this. That was one bizarre experience!

In hindsight, since our quadriceps are cut into during the total knee replacement, it goes without saying that a tkr dead weight situation would result. It just would have been nice to be informed of that so we could be properly prepared. It was a shocker to me!

Bent knee. I also needed to work on stretching out my hamstrings, along the backside of my knee, to straighten my leg. My leg would not lay flat on any surface. There was a slight bend in it.

No body weight support. Even though I was up and walking on a walker the day after my tkr, my muscles were still not developed enough to support my body weight.

No foot slides. I remember sitting in a chair and not being able to slide my foot at all. I am certain everyone goes through this. This is when those assisted physical therapy exercises come into play.

It has been eight years since my total knee replacement and my leg still gets stiff and painful after prolonged periods of walking or standing. I just rest, elevate, and ice. It’s no big deal.

Hope my tkr blog post about tkr dead weight helps others going through the same thing. Remember, you are not alone in this endeavor. Take a look around this site for more tkr insight from myself and readers.

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AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

This award-winning site is owned and operated by  Marie Buckner, a published author, tkr blogger, and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 30+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.

Marie is also a proud WEGO Health Patient Leader.

Frustration After A Total Knee Replacement

Hi everyone. Here’s a request reprint of a blog post from 2008 about having frustration six months after a total knee replacement: 

 

Going downstairs is very slow, with my knee needing much increased flexibility. Plus, it is painful. I know that I need to keep working at it, but it is just frustrating.

 

I did not expect it to take so long to recuperate from a tkr. Stairs are a great exercise for me, though.  I do notice the increased flexibility, too.

 

My knee area is still swollen. I was told by the doctor’s office it would take about 2-3 months. Sure. I know nothing is wrong, since my x-ray is perfect. My recuperation is just taking time. Everyone has a different recuperation time.

Nausea & A TKR

Hi everyone. Nausea and a tkr isn’t an exciting topic or one that you want to read at the dinner table. Still..it needs to be discussed since some of you have asked me about it….

Of the many comments I’ve received lately, a common theme concerns nausea after tkr and during recuperation. “What is your experience?â” I’ve been asked? So, here it is…

I had nausea during two periods after my tkr. The first was caused by the anesthesia while I was recuperating in the hospital. I didn’t eat much while in the hospital.

The only other episode occurred when I took the “pain meds” (I use parentheses since the meds did not handle the pain). The nausea was mild, but still noticeable. I remember that episode as being two weeks. Then, I just started aspirin.

After those two periods, no problem. The only other time I get nauseous nowadays is when I see someone eat nacho chips covered with that orange-colored liquid stuff called cheese.

Or, come to think about, when I see that orange stuff on any food. I’m suddenly not feeling well. I need to clear my mind.

Hope this helps others going through the same thing.

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AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

This healthline.com award-winning site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr blogger/patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.

Marie is also a proud WEGO Health Patient Leader.

Driving After A Total Knee Replacement

Hi everyone. After receiving some requests regarding driving after a total knee replacement (tkr), I thought a post here would be appropriate…

The standard literature us patients are given upon preparing for a tkr recommends not driving until at least 6 weeks after surgery. I had no choice but to do it sooner, however.

The reason being is that I needed to go to physical therapy and didn’t want to impose upon anyone for a  lift. Besides, I like to drive and wanted to experiment – as long as I didn’t harm myself.

Well, I can definitely see how six weeks is an appropriate time frame if the leg you use for the accelerator is the one that had a total knee replacement.

For instance, if your bionic knee is on your right leg, you’re going to have difficulty driving. There just won’t be enough flexibility to operate the accelerator, in my opinion.

However, my bionic knee is on my left leg. I could operate the accelerator with no problem. There were other problems (concerns) as mentioned below.

If my car was clutch-operated, there was no way I could have driven it within six weeks. Maybe after about 4-6 weeks, but even then there would have been extreme discomfort. Hey, driving a clutch might be another good recuperation exercise. 😉

My car has an automatic transmission. I had a problem,   with the following while driving after a total knee replacement. You may be the same:

  • Getting in and out of the car. Extreme caution had to be used to prevent any turning of the foot, hitting of the leg, and unnecessary bending of the leg.

  • Seat adjustment. I needed to put my seat back as far as I could to get in and out my vehicle properly. Nine months later, I still need to do this sometimes.

  • Sitting comfortably. This was painful. I needed to elevate my foot to alleviate some of the knee pain.

  • Time involved. It definitely is not a quick process.  The entire process is much slower than typical.

There were other areas that caused concern, but the above four were the most noticeable. No complaints, just stating facts. 🙂

Hope this helps others going through the same thing.



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AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

This healthline.com and WEGO Health award-winning site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.

Healthy Eating Speeds the TKR Recuperation Process

Hi everyone. It’s common knowledge that eating healthy can help everyone. However, this is doubly important for us living with a total knee replacement (tkr). Healthy eating speeds the tkr recuperation process.

So…here are some suggestions for quick, healthy eating that can be prepared at home:

Mix some fresh herbs with freshly squeezed juice for a low calorie dressing.

Squeeze an orange over your salad greens.

Spread some natural peanut or almond butter on an apple.

Enjoy a sandwich of tuna and mustard on wholegrain bread. Add lettuce & tomato, if desired.

Have some fresh fruit mixed with plain yogurt.

Spread some hummus on either pita bread, fresh veggies, or an English muffin.

For creamed soup, substitute pureed tofu for heavy cream.

All of these have worked well for me, and I am confident they’d work well for others. Enjoy!

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AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

This award-winning tkr blog site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.

Good Stretching Helps after TKR

Hi everyone! We all know the importance of strengthening and stretching our tkr leg muscles after surgery in order to improve our leg functioning.  Due to pain levels being so intense, it’s easy to forget how good stretching helps after a tkr.

When you finally reach a point where the pain level is lowered enough to allow other movement and you can stand with weight evenly distributed between both legs, here’s a good stretching exercise that involves nothing other than body weight….

Stand with legs shoulder-width apart. Reach your arms out to the sides so your body forms a “T”. Turn your palms facing forward. Gently lean back from the waist to increase the stretch.

Increase the stretch by moving your head in conjunction with your upper body and look toward the ceiling. Hold this stretch for as long as comfortable.

When done correctly, you will feel a good stretch along your entire body including your neck, pectorals and chest, shoulders, arms, abdomen, thighs and butt.

Don’t use any sudden movements, only a gentle stretch. Breathe normally throughout this exercise.

Try this gentle stretch throughout the day. Good luck!

Let me know how it works for you. Thanks!

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AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

This award-winning site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.

Gratitude For Shoe Lifts

Hi everyone! Some may think that wearing an orthopedic shoe lift is a hindrance. After wearing an external 1.75″ version for over 40 years, it is easy to become frustrated. Part of my post-tkr includes adjusting my shoe lifts. It is a difficult. So..that is why I have sat down and developed reasons to be grateful for wearing them.

Decreased back pain. Properly sized shoe lifts straighten your spine. When this happens, spinal alignment improves and everything starts to function at an improved level. The risks of developing pinched nerves, internal organ stress, strained muscles, and other conditions diminish.

Lessens leg length discrepancy. People with even length legs likely take this for granted. Us with leg length discrepancies know better. When one leg is shorter than the other, all kinds of health concerns result. A properly-sized shoe lift will improve the situation.

Better balance. An imbalanced body lays the foundation for a number of mental and physical ailments. Shoe lifts even out your body.

Better mental functioning. Something as insignificant as a shoe lift can improve your mental outlook. Nothing is more pleasurable than being able to walk without pain and/or discomfort.

Less strain. Failing to wear a shoe lift when needed results in placing extra strain on your opposite side. Your “good side” will be taking the brunt of pressure. This can result in muscle swelling/inflammation, painful hip and/or knee joint, and lower back pain.

Puddles. Depending upon the thickness of one’s shoe lift, puddles can easily be walked through. Your shoe will not get wet, unlike your “regular” shoe. This statement applies to shallow streams, also.

Self defense. If someone starts to give the wearer a hard time, the shoe lift can be used to place a heavy kick to the groin. (That is if you can lift your leg that much. :)) The extra weight will make for an extra punch.

Toe stomping. Shoe lifts are perfect for this. If needed, it could be part of self defense. This is especially true for an external lift.

Bug killing. The extra weight of a noticeably-sized shoe lift can provide for an easy kill of bugs that are otherwise hard to eradicate (such as a Palmetto bug..aka heavy duty cockroach.)

Just properly position your shoe over the critter and press down firmly. It saves the little critter from experiencing a lingering death. Be sure to apologize to them before the killing process, though. They usually don’t mean any harm.

Gait. I can’t think of anything funny about this, though. 🙁 Just a plain and simple, hard, cold fact. It has helped out tremendously since my total knee replacement.

Why am I writing this blog post? I have been wearing a shoe lift for so long, I forget that others are confused about wearing this walking aid. Numerous people have approached me asking for insight. Hope this helps others going through the same thing…

Thanks for visiting and taking the time to read my tkr blogger post! Hope it helps you and others going through a similar situation.

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AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

This award-winning site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.

How To Naturally Heal TKR Scars With Food

Hi everyone. Scars seem to be a common subject among you, my favorite readers. I just got done reading an interesting article on how to best heal scars the natural way. Knowing what a doozy we all have, I thought it would be fun to write a post about how foods can be used to naturally heal a tkr scar.

Personally, I like my tkr scar. It’s healed just fine. Nine years after my total knee replacement surgery, it has blended in well. In part, I believe, is the fact I eat a lot of fresh fruits and vegetables. Food is my healing agent.

Below is some information that provides insight into my reasoning. My data comes from personal experience as well as backup content from the American Dietetic Association. Here goes….

Vitamins that can benefit scar healing are high in antioxidants. The antioxidants are essential for healing of wounds/scars. These include Vitamins C, E and A. I’ll talk about Vitamin C now, for no particular reason other than it’s fresh on my mind. Here goes…

Vitamin C is found in more vegetables than you probably imagine. It is found in dark leafy vegetables such as spinach, mustard greens, collard greens and various dark-colored lettuces (like red leaf).

The vitamin is also found in winter squash, green peppers, broccoli, brussel sprouts (or mini-cabbages as some know them) and cabbage varieties.

If you have a sweet tooth (which fruit can satisfy), you’re in luck. Vitamin C is found in berries such as raspberries, blackberries, strawberries, marionberries, blueberries and huckleberries. Citrus fruits like oranges, grapefruit, lemons and limes are also rich in the vitamin.

Mango, watermelon and pineapples are other sources that contain ample amounts to help in skin healing. Snacking on a mango..oohlala! Mixing some fresh fruit into plain yogurt is another option…:)

So you know, I’m talking about the fresh varieties of fruits and vegetables. Personally, I’m not a fan of canned foods, but they do come in handy. One occasion involves using them in my minestrone soup base when ripe fresh ones are unavailable.

It’s also nice to have some canned food on hand for emergency power outages or the like. For everyday/consistent eating, though…no. Nothing beats a freshly steamed pot of veggies and serving of protein.

Well, hope this helps others going through the same thing. Take action to start naturally healing any total knee replacement scars. Remember… You are what you eat.

Find my tkr blog post about how to naturally heal tkr scars with food interesting? I surely hope so. Kindly share whenever possible…Thanks!

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

This award-winning tkr blogger site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.