recuperation

Natural Remedies for A TKR

Hi everyone. I am always on a mission to find natural remedies for a tkr. There are many available. Most are cheap, nutritious, and easy to find. RICE comes into play. This post is especially for a friend who is having a tkr today.

Ice. This is a no-brainer. Putting ice in a towel before placing it on my knee helps out tremendously.

Rest. Take a break and simply resting must be included in the list of natural remedies for a tkr. I find laying on the couch solves this dilemma perfectly. 🙂

Elevation. Raising my tkr leg above heart level helps reduce swelling. This, in turn, lowers pain levels.

Compression. Wrapping my tkr knee in a compression bandage helps reduce swelling. I do this before going for a walk.

Make certain not to wrap your tkr too tightly, though. That will hurt and make things worse.

Bananas. My favorite fruit! Bananas contain plentiful amounts of potassium. This mineral helps reduce leg cramps (which I commonly get). It also boosts my energy levels.

Hockey. It is inspiring to watch what players go through and bounce back without a hitch. I admire that.

Humor. One of the most important natural remedies for a tkr is keeping a good sense of humor. Find humor in as much as possible. Laughter is medicine.

Music. What more needs to be said? Choose your favorite genre and lose yourself.

Massage. I find that giving myself a massage helps increase circulation, lower stiffness, and decrease pain. Anytime, anywhere.

That’s all the natural remedies for a tkr that I can think of for now. Hopefully, they will help you also.

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AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

This tkr blog site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physical conditions for over 30+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.

Talking About Laptop Heat & A TKR

Hi everyone. Recently, I have been putting my laptop onto a towel and then placing it onto my lap. One of my readers asked me if I, or anyone else, had experienced pain from laptop heat and a tkr. She had been using her laptop while sitting on her sofa or bed. She noticed that there was immense pain after a while. Let’s start talking about laptop heat and a tkr.

Well, within the last two weeks, it has happened to me. (I am 19 months post-tkr, for the records).

After about 20 minutes, I notice a pain in my tkr area. Sometimes the pain is not that intense, other times it is. My knee is very hot at times. Other times it is warm.

Either way….I’m going to find another way to use my laptop that is ergonomically correct. It is time to experiment with laptop heat and a tkr. I wonder if those Portabooks really work?

If you find this post talking about laptop heat and a tkr interesting, kindly share….

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.
This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and total knee replacement patient who has been living with various physical conditions for over 30+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing. 

7 Ways to Speed Up Your Knee Replacement Recuperation

Hi my favorite readers. Many of you have approached me recently inquiring about ways to make the tkr recuperation easier. There is no simple approach, unfortunately. Sharing one of my more popular posts regarding this topic may help you. Good luck!

Having a total knee replacement surgery is only part of the process. Always remember that. How you deal with the recuperation to actually use your new knee is another part. It, actually, is the hardest part. Only you can determine the extent of your success.

  • Here are some ways I have noticed an improvement in my total knee replacement recuperation. My knee is getting better every day because of them. They may work for you. Here goes…

    * Every hour on the hour, get up and walk around. Even if it is for only a couple of minutes. You need to stand up and get your blood flowing. Your level of recuperation (and physical therapist) will determine whether you use a walking aide or not.

  • *Do as much as you can for yourself. Lower your reliance on others when you can easily do it yourself. You will only be hurting yourself.
  • *Know that it will be painful. You cannot get around having pain after a major surgery. Bummer.

    *Take a pain med prior to your exercise. I find that ½ hour beforehand works best for me. This will help make your exercise regimen go easier. Of course, your pain meds will decrease as time goes on and your level of recuperation increases. The sooner the better, I say.

    *Set a goal for your knee flexibility. Find a ‘hash mark’ on the floor that you want to stretch your foot to. Lift your leg farther than an earlier attempt. Your physical therapist can help with this.

    *Keep icing. After every exercise bout, ice your knee area. The best is a simple ice pack. Or, frozen peas and carrots work well.:)

    *Elevate. Keep your leg elevated when not exercising. This helps the healing.

    Recuperating from a total knee replacement takes work, time and effort. Stay with it and you will only benefit. Remember to check back here often to realize that you are not alone.

    Find interesting? Kindly share…

    AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

    This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.







    Walking Sticks and A TKR

    Hi everyone. Recently, I have heard quite a bit about how helpful walking sticks were for exercise purposes. Some of you have asked me about them, also. So, I have used them on some of my daily walks. They were OK, but not something I would want to use regularly. They did come in handy on another event, though…

    Scenario:
    It was during a hike. The expedition was originally presented to me as a 5-mile round-trip beach walk. No problem, I thought. Hah!! It turned into a 8-9 mile round-trip walk in the woods, going through old growth forests. (I think the technical term is backwoods.)

    One of my hiking companions had a couple of walking sticks. She was praising the benefits of the sticks and swore she wouldn’t go hiking without them. Her ankles were giving her problems. Plus, she mentioned how the sticks helped her balance.

    When I asked her how they worked, she gave a demonstration. She put the stick down into the ground and it went all the way down to the handle. See…parts of this trail were big time mud traps. It was a hilarious sight, and I burst out laughing. Luckily…she was not hurt and did not fall.

    A while later, another portion of the hike involved going down a muddy trail. When she offered one of her sticks, I took her up on it. I am glad I did. There was no way I could have made it down that decline without the aid of the stick. The stick kept me from falling and definitely game me support.

    Moral: Getting used to the walking stick was the hard part. Once this hurdle is overcome, it really is an asset to have around. It has come in handy on numerous occasions, other than hiking.

    Conclusion:
    So, for anyone interested in using a walking stick after a tkr..I highly recommend it. I’m not getting paid to say this or writing any reviews. This handy device just makes walking and hiking so much easier, especially on questionable terrains.

    Hope this helps others going through the same thing.

    Find interesting? Kindly share…

    AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

    This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.







    How To Lower Your Risks of Falling

    Hi my favorite readers! While recuperating, and preparing, for a total knee replacement it is important to prepare your living area to help avoid falls. Here are some helpful tips on how to lower your risks of falling. They apply for everyone, not just a total knee replacement person.

    This is also an excerpt from my ebook titled…”Preparing for a Total Knee Replacement”.

    * Remove all loose rugs that do not have a nonstick backing. If possible, duct tape the rugs to the floor – if desired.

    * Remove all loose rugs, period. Sometimes, depending on your balance, crutches and walkers will have a hard time getting around the edges of loose rugs.

    * Remove all cords from the floor. If you don’t remove them, make certain that you can maneuver around them without causing any distress.

    I have known people who didn’t look down while walking and tripped over cords that easily could have been avoided had they watching where they were walking.

    * Be careful and aware of your surroundings. It is crucial for fall prevention.

    * Watch out for small animals. They have a tendency to run under your feet quickly and without warning.

    * I recommend not having any small animals (considered hazards) around for the first week after surgery. Do your part in fall prevention and total knee replacement instances.

    * Don’t reach for anything above your head.  It is too easy to lose your balance this way.

    * Don’t drink alcohol. If you simply must have it, consume minimal amounts. This is common sense, but it does affect one’s balance.

    * Don’t lean to either side while on your crutches or walker. Keep your body weight evenly positioned. Remember to keep a square, safe reach area around you. Again, you will lose your balance too easily if you don’t.

    It is easy to avoid falling while recuperating from a total knee replacement if you prepare both yourself and home beforehand. Be successful by using these how to tips. All are tried and true.

    Hope this helps others going through the same thing.

    Find this tkr blog post containing tips on how to lower your risks of falling interesting? Kindly share…Thanks!

    AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

    This award-winning site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.

    Stairs as a Knee Replacement Exercise

    Hi everyone. When working on gaining flexibility in your knee, a great exercise is to walk up and down stairs. Going up is much easier than going down.

    Part of the recuperation process after a total knee replacement involves a variety of exercises involving stairs or steps.

    The first movement in my case was to simply stand up and lift my leg onto a step. I say simply, but it was definitely not easy. It took all the energy I had. (TKR surgery involves cutting through the quadricep muscle, the largest muscle in your leg.)

    Then, lift our body weight onto your tkr leg.

    Place your “good” leg onto the step/stair.

    Hold this position for five seconds.

    Return to the original position.

    Rest for 10 seconds.

    Repeat five times. Slowly increase your time and repetitions.

    Do this maneuver with the aid of crutches, at first. Then, eventually, all that will needed is the aid of railings or parallel bars.

    It is not easy, but once it starts working out….it’s great. Hard work pays off.

    NOTE: You may want to start this exercise by placing your tkr leg onto a step, lifting your body up until your knee is straight, and then lowering yourself back to the original position.

    AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

    This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.

    What Exactly Does “Pain Med” Mean?

    Hi everyone. After almost three months of recuperating from a total knee replacement surgery, I have finally figured out what is meant by “pain med”. At first, I thought it meant that the medications were supposed to alleviate pain completely. That just was not so. What exactly does “pain med” mean?

    In fact, no matter what type I was given, there was still pain. Sometimes the pain was unbearable. It always existed in some form. So, I resigned myself to the fact that a pain med just doesn’t work.

    Then, I ran out. I didn’t think it as any big deal. Usually, I took one pain med one-half hour before my pt or exercise.   Well, this time I just went for a walk thinking “What’s the use of a pain med, anyways? The term is joke.”

    Wow….what a difference! The pain was intense after finishing my exercise routine. I could hardly move my leg.

    So, the verdict is….pain meds help take the edge off of pain. They decrease the pain intensity. They do not totally eliminate pain, as some (like me) would think.

    Find interesting? Kindly share…

    AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

    This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.

    Easy Exercises for Arthritic Knees

    Hi everyone. While browsing the Internet recently, I came upon an informative and illustrative article about easy exercises for arthritic knees. It may seem counterintuitive to exercise when in pain, but it does help you out in many ways.

    For the records, I do many of these exercises to this day – even years after my tkr (total knee replacement). They are helping my “good” knee while keeping my tkr knee in shape. 🙂

    Click on the below link to be taken to the article found on Healthline.com:

    Easy Exercises for Knee Arthritis

    Thanks for stopping by. Good luck!

    Find interesting? Kindly share…

    AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

    This award-winning site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.

    Finding Inspiration During Recuperation

    Hi everyone. As anyone knows, any type of recuperation process is difficult, time consuming, and sometimes overwhelming. This is especially true with a tkr (total knee replacement). With everything that is involved, it is too easy to get frustrated. We must focus on the positive and start finding inspiration during recuperation.

    It’s always informative reading through comments posted throughout this site. There seems to be an underlying theme found in most of the posts. That theme is inspiration. Most people find it from some source or manner. It all varies with the individual.

    So…it brought some memories of how inspiration played a key role in my life while recuperating from my car accident. Here’s my story that I hope you enjoy…

    I was in a body cast, visiting the doctor monthly. The doctor’s appointment was the only time I got out other than to walk the block daily. One time, after much pressure, I went on a date as a diversion. If you think dating is uncomfortable in everyday life, try doing it in a body cast. Ha!

    Anyways, I was back at home all wrapped up in myself and my current situation. I needed hope. I needed to know that more existed than my continual, miniscule steps toward learning how to independently walk again.

    One night I turned on the television and there was Jacques Cousteau. Back then (the 70’s) he had an hour-long show on Thursday nights. It was known as the “Undersea World of Jacques Cousteau”.

    Each episode focused on introducing us to one ocean-dwelling marine species. Suddenly, my perspective changed. It gave me something to look forward to. What was I going to learn next?

    Here I was one single individual (a small speck on the earth’s surface) learning about an entire species. I was also learning how that same species was under attack by human encroachment.

    I saw the marvel of lobsters walking single file over the ocean’s surface by using telepathic communication. Wow..

    At the end of the episode we heard about how the lobster industry hones in on, and disrupts, this natural process. It is prime commercial lobstering time.

    I learned about the wonderful, peaceful manatees and how they are affectionately known as the “gentle giants”. They were a sight to behold. At the end of the episode we learned about how boat propellers were damaging/killing them.

    I remember an episode about killer whales. We learned about these beautiful wonders, their intelligence, communication skills, and other magnificent insight only he was capable of presenting so compellingly.

    Then, he started discussing these mammals being kept in captivity. Cousteau emphasized how it was only a matter of time before these majestic creatures rebelled. Have you seen the movie Black Fish? Case closed.

    Every episode featured the Calypso, his research vessel. The Calypso was a converted WWII mine sweeper. After my recuperation process ended, I became a proud member of the “Friends of Calypso”, a group of supporters who kept the Calypso operating.

    I hung my Calypso flag proudly on my wall alongside my welcome letter, progress updates, current journey news, research projects, and other paraphernalia. It was a continual source of inspiration.

    In conclusion, be sure to find something that takes you outside of yourself. Be inspired. It will improve your motivation, outlook on life, and enhance your body’s healing capabilities.

    Hope this helps others going through the same thing. Find interesting? Kindly share…

    For those wanting more information about the Cousteau Society, here is a link to their website:
    Cousteau Society

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    AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

    This healthline.com award-winning site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner. She is a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physical conditions for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.

    Music and TKR Recuperation

    Hi everyone. Sending the best wishes that this New Year is finding you in good spirits and that you are working hard to make yourself better. Have you thought about making music part of your total knee recuperation (tkr)? Music and tkr recuperation…YES!!

    We always hear that music soothes the soul. As a musician, I have seen and heard remarkable things related to music. After listening to my performance, people regale wonderful stories that sometimes stand my neck hairs on end. Nice…It can work for you, as well.

    Anyways, whenever the times gets tough…put on some music. You likely are already doing this, but for those who forget about the powers of music..get started. The sooner, the better.

    With so many genres available, there is bound to be one (or more) that suit your individual preferences. What is even nicer, is the fact that there is music available to suit your mood at any time.

    Music can transport you to a happy place when those tkr recuperation exercises seem like they will never end.

    Music can also take your mind and soul to a relaxed state that is perfect upon the completion of your workout. Whatever the need, music will satisfy it.

    To quote Dr. Daniel Amen, “The best music is the kind that inspires a different feeling or emotion, the kind that elicits a reaction.”

    There are numerous studies and professional resources available touting the benefits of music. Check them out if you have some time.

    So…put on your favorite music and help your blood pressure, mood outlook, energy level, and other health-promoting items.

    Find my tkr blog post about music and tkr recuperation interesting? Kindly share…

    AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

    This award-winning site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.

    Get Physical

    Post-TKR Exercise Is Always Important

    Hi everyone! It has been awhile since my tkr and I have been asked numerous times if any post-tkr exercise is still needed. The answer is…YES!! Unless you want to go through life with a stiff tkr knee, post-tkr exercise is always important.  Everyone needs to exercise, irregardless of their physical condition.

    I’ve had readers tell me that they can’t wait to finish physical therapy so they don’t have to exercise. Many never do the exercises they were given and believe all will be well. There will be a rude awakening, I guarantee it.

    Once the rehab exercises stop, we need to condition our minds that daily exercise is needed. It is not something to dread. We need to be grateful that we can move efficiently enough to exercise. Exercise needs to be viewed as fun, not a task.

    Exercise does not have to be strenuous, either. Of course, the best cardiovascular benefits will be obtained by partaking at a moderately brisk pace for at least 30 minutes, 5 times weekly.

    It can be walking, swimming and/or water aerobics, riding a bike (stationary or real), or even gardening. Cleaning around the house counts (vacuuming, cleaning cupboards, etc).

    walking-man

    Granted, these activities come some time after a tkr. I, personally, had a very difficult time vacuuming for a couple of months after my tkr. No complaints, here. ha!  Even walking took time.

    I’m sure we all know about the difficulties involved on a more personal scale. As the saying goes, “everything worthwhile takes time”.

    Please do not think that once you are finished with your rigorous rehab routine, that the exercise stops. That’s setting yourself up for disaster. You need to keep your body moving. If you’re complaining about that, think of the alternative.

    Lack of exercise can lead to a variety of negative health ailments, which may ultimately result in a permanently horizontal position (death). Lying in a wooden box isn’t too appealing to me. I hope it isn’t to you, either.

    I would like to believe that anyone who has gone through a tkr wants to make the most of it. You received your new artificial knee so you can move without pain, right? So…get up and do that post-tkr exercise! Your overall health will thank you.

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    AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

    This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.

    TKR Exercise Is Critical

    Hi everyone! One of my readers sent me this article about the importance of exercising after a total knee replacement. I thought it was interesting and wanted to share it again. The powerful data never grows old…

    Exercise after knee replacement critical..
    http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2009-02/uod-eak020209.php

    It may be uncomfortable at first, but doing exercises to strengthen your quadriceps after you’ve had knee replacement surgery due to osteoarthritis is critical to your recovery. In fact, it can boost the function of your new knee to nearly that of a healthy adult your age.

    That’s the finding of a University of Delaware study published in the February issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

    The authors include Lynn Snyder-Mackler, Alumni Distinguished Professor of Physical Therapy at the University of Delaware, Stephanie Petterson, clinical faculty at Columbia University, Ryan Mizner, an assistant professor at Eastern Washington University, Jennifer Stevens, an assistant professor at the University of Colorado at Denver, and Drs. Leo Raisis, Alex Bodenstab, and William Newcomb of First State Orthopaedics in Newark, Delaware.

    “It sounds logical that exercises to strengthen your knee should be a component of your post-operative physical therapy after a total knee replacement, but it’s not the convention at all,” says Snyder-Mackler.

    “There are all of these old wives’ tales that strength training is a detriment to the patient and that the new knee should be treated delicately,” Snyder-Mackler notes. “Our study demonstrates that intensive strength exercise as outpatient therapy is critical to begin three to four weeks after surgery.”

    Nearly 500,000 knee replacements, also known as total knee arthroplasties, are performed every year in the United States to treat severe knee osteoarthritis, the loss of the cushiony cartilage padding the knee. The joint disease leaves its sufferers with persistent pain and limited function, resulting in an overall diminished quality of life.

    While knee replacement alleviates the pain of osteoarthritis and improves function, patients exhibit impaired quadriceps strength and function for such activities as walking and climbing stairs, and the levels remain below those of healthy people of the same age.

    In a randomized controlled trial at the University of Delaware’s Physical Therapy Clinic conducted between 2000 and 2005, 200 patients who had undergone knee replacements were given six weeks of progressive strength training two or three times a week starting four weeks after surgery. Half of the group also received neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES).

    Their function was compared to that of 41 patients who received conventional rehabilitation and home physical therapy. Quadriceps strength, knee range of motion, and gait were measured in such tests as timed up and go, stair climbing and a six-minute walk.

    The group in the progressive strength-training program showed significant improvement in quadriceps strength and functional performance. They also demonstrated substantially greater quadriceps strength and functional performance after 12 months than the group that underwent conventional rehabilitation.

    “This study clearly demonstrates the importance of surgeons encouraging their patients to be compliant with progressive quadriceps strengthening during their rehabilitation to enhance their clinical improvement and function post-total knee replacement,” notes Dr. Leo Raisis, a total joint surgeon and adjunct associate professor at the University of Delaware.

    “Why undergo a $25,000 elective surgery and then not do as much as you can to get the most out of it and improve your quality of life?” Snyder-Mackler says. “Older people are incredibly motivated—they hurt after the surgery and they want to be better. They need to do this.”

    Hope this helps others going through the same thing. Remember, you are not alone. Check back here often for further insight to help your tkr recuperation process.

    Find interesting? Kindly share…Thanks!

    AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

    This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 30+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.

    Gentle Exercise

    Chair Yoga: Can It Help With A TKR, or Other, Recuperation?

    Hi everyone. You have likely heard about chair yoga, but may be uncertain about whether it can help you. After attending classes for about a year, I thought it would be fun to share some insight. I have written previously about this wonderful exercise form, but further insight is needed.

    chairyoga photos courtesy of SparkPeople

    * You can adjust the movements to your liking. Unlike some exercise routines that demand a certain movement, there are ways to obtain benefits without sacrificing your health. You can do a partial movement and gain tremendous benefits. A qualified instructor will gently guide you.

    * Anyone can do this. Chair yoga is not easy yoga, but can be done by anyone. It is ideal for those needing to gently, yet firmly, get their bodies back into shape. Movements can strengthen, stretch, and balance your entire physique.

    * You exercise in a quiet, calming manner. There is no high stress involved. Calming music plays in the background. Every session begins and ends with a quiet meditation that clears the mind.

    * You learn the yoga term and how the movement affects the body. The insight into yoga is always interesting to me. It likely will be to you, as well.

    These are just some reasons I suggest trying chair yoga whenever possible. Give it a shot. What do you have to lose? I have known many people who include this ancient exercise form as part of their daily routine.

    So….To answer the title question: YES!!!!!!!!!!!

    Find this tkr recuperation chair yoga post interesting? Kindly share..Thanks!

    AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.


    This award-winning site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.