recuperation

What Do Those Generalized Post-TKR Guidelines Mean?

Hi everyone. I have received a variety of comments from various readers asking about the significance of those generalized post-tkr guidelines found in literature. It got me thinking that it seems like an appropriate time to write a post. Thanks for the inquiries!

I believe the generic information provided gives us excellent insight into what to expect. It is important to remember that the data is written for the masses, not for one particular patient. That is the key:

We need to always take into consideration that everyone heals differently, at his or her own rate. Everyone brings a unique set of situations and health conditions with them into this arduous tkr surgery situation.

Here are some suggestions that may make dealing with recuperation easier. All are based on my real-life experiences.

* Gain insight without becoming frustrated. It is far too easy to think you are not progressing as planned when reading about generic information. This is simply not true.

* After reading the information, find another source to turn to for further real-life insight. Read comments from other tkr, total knee replacement, patients. I started this site/forum as a way to discuss my situation. It has eventually turned into a very supportive community where everyone feels comfortable sharing experiences.

* Read the generic literature and know that numerous variables exist. Know that if the data shows it is possible to drive after six weeks, it means that the average person does that. Do you have a manual or automatic transmission? If you have a manual transmission, was your tkr on your left leg? If so, that will make a HUGE difference.

* Know yourself. That is the key to success. Someone (like me) with 30-year old scar tissue will never have as much knee flexibility as someone who has zero tissue build-up. That is just an example.

* Have confidence in yourself. Instead of thinking about all the ways you can fall or fail, retrain your mind to view tkr recuperation as a step-by-step process, with each step building on the previous. It takes determination, patience, and diligence. Hard work will pay off. Never give up on yourself.

Well, that is all I can conjure up for now. Pick up some of this valuable generic information, but be sure to never downgrade your progress due to it. We are all different, but as the infamous philosopher Red Green says..”We are all in this together.”

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AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.


This award-winning site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 30+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.






How to Maintain Exercise Mojo After A TKR

Hi everyone! It is so easy to lose interest in exercising when recuperating from a tkr. At first, the pain is so intense that the frustration level is….when is this going to end? I know that’s what it was like for me. And, the steps forward would be matched with steps backward. It’s unexpected. So…how do you maintain exercise mojo after a tkr?

Take a break. By that I mean instead of doing your full set of tkr exercises, do one or two at a time. Do a couple later in the day. Break up your exercise routine.

Do isometrics. If the thought of doing your tkr rehab exercises is just too much, isometrics will help. They did in my case. While laying on either the sofa or bed, tighten your thigh and leg muscles. This strengthens your muscles and allows you to use them more efficiently. You’re getting exercise, only it may not seem like it.

Realize it is temporary. Everyone gets discouraged at times, it is only human. Instead of getting upset over your motivation being gone, accept the fact. It will pass.

Get off the sofa. The process of moving around will increase your physical activity. Something as simple as walking (did I say “simple” for a tkr patient?!) will help your tkr situation.

Don’t listen to what others say. People who haven’t gone through a tkr usually do not understand how difficult the recuperation process is. I know this suggestion is easier said than done.

Watch a comedy. Laugh until you cry. Laughter has a tendency to soothe the soul and massage your innards. Personally, there’s nothing better than watching Curly shoot that live oyster in his oyster stew or try to slap it silly. Or, Moe yelling…”Up to the basement!” or calling all high society women “toots”.

The scene when the Stooges are playing golf comes to mind. Moe is divoting up the entire green. The grounds keeper goes nuts. Moe’s response…”Aw, what are you gripin’ about? They’re getting smaller aren’t they?” lol…

Then there’s Larry trying to find the beginning of the greens wire. He keeps pulling on the wire until he circles the entire green and his head pops out of the ground. (You’ve got to see it to appreciate it.) And, Curly….he’s doing his laundry at the ball washer. OK…I’ll stop. Yes, I am a Three Stooges fan. 🙂

Or…the gopher in the original Caddyshack. Gotta love that vermin. Monty Python is another suggestion. Simple absurdity does it every time. 🙂

I could go on and on. Rejuvenate your spirit in a manner that suits you. Find a distraction.

Hope this helps. It does get better. I promise.

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AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

This award-winning site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 30+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.






Yoga as TKR Recuperation

Hi my favorite readers! Yoga has become mainstream as being the ideal way to rejuvenate the mind, body and soul. There is something particularly interesting about this ancient practice, however. It seems that the more we learn about yoga, the more we realize how intertwined it is into a variety of life’s areas. I am speaking about calisthenics and tkr recuperation, for this article’s purpose.

Look at any of the calisthenic stretching exercises and you will find a common yoga thread. Some of the yoga positions may be altered, but the basics are there. It’s quite interesting, actually. Of course, all exercises have standardized Western names to fit them in more perfectly with the culture. Go online to any reputable yoga site. Yoga Journal comes to mind. Find a list of postures. Then, go online to any fitness site and check out the flexibility exercises. Compare the two and find the similarities. If you do not want to go online, simply pick up a hard copy of your favorite yoga or fitness-oriented publication.

Case in point: While recuperating from a tkr, or total knee replacement, a common exercise concentrates on stretching out your hamstring. As you probably know, this is the muscle that runs along the backside of your knee. It plays a crucial role in properly supporting your knee.

One particular exercise is known as a wall slide. The wall slide involves laying on your back and placing your tkr leg on the wall. To stretch your hamstring, you need to place as much of your leg as possible against the wall.

As it turns out, this same position is titled a “Supported Inversion” in yoga. This posture is currently being promoted as one of many postures that can help you get a sound night’s sleep. Go figure.

Life is intertwined, isn’t it?

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Chair Yoga After A TKR?

Hi everyone! First of all, let me start by simply extending my thanks and gratitude to all of you for visiting my site. It’s so nice to receive private messages and posted comments letting me know how useful this site is. That is always nice to hear and read! Now..on to the topic for this article…

I recently had the opportunity to attend a chair yoga class. After hearing and reading so much about this gentle form of exercise, I thought it would be interesting to experience it first hand. The results… what a wonderfully effective way to spend an hour. Here’s the scoop…

The class started with us setting up a firm chair that was placed on a mat. There was a strap, ball, and block nearby. We all introduced ourselves to each other before taking our places. The instructor personally greeted newcomers and returning students with a genuine friendliness and concern. Before we began exercising, she broke the ice by sharing a story about her dog and some missing chickens. It was quite entertaining and an excellent way to put a personal spin on things.

Our class took place in a large workout room, with a closed door. Our exercise started with deep breathing exercises that transported our mind and body into a state of calmness and readiness. There was gentle music playing in the background. It was very peaceful.

Every movement was explained and demonstrated before we attempted it. No movement was forced, accommodations could be made so no pain was experienced. We were told to not push beyond our comfort level. The importance of maintaining a silent, straight string from the top of the head to the bottom of the spine was discussed.

The other students were shoe-less, but since I need an almost 2” shoe-lift to balance myself, my shoes were on the entire class. There was no pressure for me to remove my shoes. I was very concerned about that when the class first started since I noticed everyone else removing their shoes. I felt out of place and uncomfortable. I thought maybe I could not participate. Nope, I was luckily wrong.

We stretched our obliques, shoulders, neck, abdomen, glutes (or butt as some know it…:) ), and entire legs. We did some stand-up balancing poses. While other students were replicating the instructor’s movement, I could gently alter the applicable exercise and still get a wonderful stretch.

I was pleasantly surprised how tired I was when class concluded. My entire body felt it had gotten a good workout. I will be returning….

Hope this helps others going through the same thing.

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AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns. The site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 30+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.






Can Hamstrings Hurt after a Total Knee Replacement?

Hi everyone! I recently had someone ask me “can hamstrings hurt after a total knee replacement?” The answer is a definite, resounding “YES!!” Here is a popular article of mine that I am resharing…

You likely know this, but…The back of the knee is where the hamstring muscles are. Four months after my surgery, I still needed to elevate my leg on a pillow while laying down.

Without doing elevation, my hamstrings can be very painful. Even seven years post-tkr, the back of my knee hurts sometimes.  It is getting better, however.

If someone does not have painful hamstrings after a total knee replacement, I say they are very lucky.  It seems unlikely, but some probably wonder can hamstrings hurt after a tkr since they have no pain.

BTW: I Just found out about a great exercise for strengthening hamstrings…sit in a chair with feet flat on the floor, pull your heels back toward the chair.

Or, sit in a chair that has wheels (like an office chair) and pull yourself around the room with your weak leg.

Find this tkr post pondering the issue can hamstrings hurt after a total knee replacement   interesting? Kindly share…Thanks!

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

This tkr blog site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 30+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.

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How To Turn Car Washing into TKR Exercise

Washing your own car not only saves money, but can provide an all-body workout. Just try washing your own by hand and tell me it’s not a good cardio workout. 🙂 And, there are ways to improvise to get more tkr (total knee replacement) exercise. Try these…

While stretching and reaching to wash the roof and hood area of your car, gently straighten your tkr leg. This helps stretch out your entire back and leg area.

While bending down to wash the lower parts of your car, gently straighten your knee until you feel a mild stretch along the backside of your knee. There, you’re stretching your hamstrings without doing much different.

While cleaning the inside of your car, gently bend your good knee and place it on your seat. Keep your tkr knee straight and start cleaning your car’s interior…wiping down the dash, console area, door rests, etc. The farther you stretch, the more the backside of your leg, arms and back will stretch. Just be certain you don’t stretch so far that you harm yourself. Common sense, but worth repeating.

Well, those are some ways I wanted to share about how to naturally stretch out your tkr leg. Remember, though, these maneuvers may not be possible until you have enough flexibility and strength in your tkr leg.

I, personally, couldn’t wash my car without excessive pain for a solid six months after my surgery. You may be different, since everyone varies.

Do you have any experiences you want to share in exercising your tkr leg?

Find my tkr blog post about how to turn car washing into tkr exercise interesting? Kindly share…

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

This healthline.com award-winning site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 30+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.







Being Safe While Walking On Ice With A TKR

Hey all you mugs..Oh, oh. It looks like those 50’s gangster movies are rubbing off. Reverse…Hi everyone! Let’s talk about being safe while walking on ice with a tkr.

For those of us in colder climates, it is the season that ice can sneak up on us. It is important to watch for it in all situations, let alone when dealing with a tkr. Ice can appear inconspicuous. Here are some helpful suggestions…

Wear proper footwear. Be sure you are wearing good treaded shoes. Smooth soles have a tendency to slide far too easily. Hiking boots are excellent and well worth the investment.

Feel first. This means before taking a step, test the area. Put your foot on the surface and slide it a bit. Be sure to hold onto something else for security purposes. I usually test a 2-inch area. It only takes a few seconds, but can save much hardship.

Watch out for snow. This may sound easy, but it is interesting how some people forget that ice may exist underneath the snow. Snow provides traction, but walking too quickly increases risks of falling or slipping.

Inform others. It may seem kind of foolish to inform others of your condition, but not everyone knows that you have an artificial knee. You are prone to increased risks that others may not have to deal with. Think of yourself and your safety first. Safety first is a great motto to follow.

Avoid tensing up. That may be easier said than done, but the more your muscles tense up, the more likely you are to injure yourself. Just use caution.

Don’t trust others opinions. I have known people who failed to clean private property of snow and ice, yet tell others that it is okay to walk on. Listen to your own intuition.

Hope this helps others going through the same thing.

NOTE: Let the records show that nothing beats watching an Edgar G. Robinson movie, complete with the gangster lingo, for an entertaining way to spend some time! The only drawback is bursting out laughing or chuckling while on a public treadmill. 🙂

Find interesting? Kindly share….Thanks!

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.


The site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 30+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.






Sleeping After A TKR

I noticed there has been quite a few inquiries into this blog lately regarding sleeping after a tkr. I have written about this before, but thought I would update the information.

It took me a good, solid 10 months after my tkr before I could sleep comfortably without waking up in pain. It took 6 months just to be able to turn onto my side, and even though I could do that, it was not without pain.

I think sleeping comfortably after a tkr is a very underrated issue. So many nights I woke up yelling since I moved my leg the wrong way, unintentionally. My leg could not lay flat and my hamstring was still stretching out. That’s painful. And, painful is an understatement. Moving my tkr leg to the side was painful. I couldn’t bend my knee without pain. All in all, ouch…

Pain meds did not work on me. They usually caused me breathing problems. They certainly did not take care of any pain. The term “pain med” is a joke to me, actually. Icing provided the best relief. Plus, it’s cheaper.

I feel for anyone going through the initial phases of a tkr recuperation. Sleeping does not come easily. I remember telling a friend, 10 months after my tkr, how it was the first night I slept through the entire night. It was after eating a bowl of seafood chowder. Man, did that taste good. And, I slept.

Hope this helps anyone going through the same thing….

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Gentle Massaging & A TKR

Hi my favorite readers! It’s so great hearing from everyone who takes the time to leave comments. It always provides valuable feedback that informs, enlightens and entertains everyone. One subject was recently brought up that sparked a new post. It’s about massaging the tkr area.

Here’s an article I wrote about massaging after a tkr that I believe is appropriate for sharing again…

After my wound bandage and staples were removed, I found massage to be invaluable for easing discomfort levels. I would very gently rub along each side of my tkr scar. During the initial stages, my knee would be elevated on a pillow while I sat on a sofa. Eventually, I would gently bend the knee and massage it with my fingertips. Circular motions over the top and bottom portions of the scar worked well, too.

Sometimes massaging the inner and outer knee edges does wonders for pain. I’ve written previously about having severe neuropathy along the outer portion of my tkr. This was caused by a bone spur. It will never go away. The pain level varies. It’s part of life and I don’t worry about it. When it does get bothersome, however, I find that a gentle massage with my fingertips works wonders. So does icing. 🙂 When I use an exercise machine, I put extra cushioning over the area to protect the nerves.

Applying light circular pressure to my inner tkr side eases the pain. When done slowly, it feels wonderful. You may receive the same relief.

When my scar was completely healed, I started massaging the entire tkr knee area. Even to this day, just a simple up and down movement feels very relaxing. I use my entire hand for this one. Usually, my palm will begin to warm up the knee area. If there is any pain, it definitely lessens with this easy massage.

Hope this tkr blog post helps others going through the same thing.

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Icing a New Total Knee Replacement….OUCH!

Hi my favorite readers! After receiving numerous requests for this information, it seems appropriate to provide this reprint of a previous post about icing a total knee replacement:

Part of my total knee replacement recuperation process involves, of course, physical therapy. After I complete my exercises, I am offered icing.

At first it was “yeah!”   Now, it’s…”OUCH!”.  See, instead of just lying on my back and relaxing (like I used to do while being iced), they have started a new torture device…er, technique.

My hamstrings need to be stretched out after 30 years of not using them properly.  My leg is not straight like it needs to be. So, to help this process along:

I lay on my stomach,  place my knee on an ice bag, and another ice bag contraption is placed on the back of my knee.

Then, a 2-pound weight is put on my ankle.

This entire process occurs after an exercise involving my knee hanging over the side of the table.

That timer can’t move fast enough.

Hope this helps others going through the process of icing a total knee replacement.

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AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

This healthline.com award-winning site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 30+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.

Healing After A Total Knee Replacement

Hi my favorite readers! I am honored to present this informative guest post written by an Austrailian physiotherapist. Take the following information into consideration during your tkr recuperation process.

Being a candidate of a total knee replacement surgery, you probably have been told that life after surgery will be the same as before. However, just like with any other treatment, the healing process does not take place overnight and you must follow your healthcare provider’s instructions for successful recovery.

Post-surgery activities
Your knee is the largest joint in your body. Therefore, a complete replacement is a major surgery. The following measures will help you adapt to your new knee and gradually start physical activity.

In the hospital
Before your discharge, the following steps will be undertaken:
* Early mobilization
Due to prolonged rest, your knee and muscles may have become very weak. Therefore, you may be instructed to resume subtle activity in order to strengthen the quadriceps muscles and be better able to control your new joint. Moreover, early activity is also essential to neutralize the after-effects of anesthesia and promote healing.

* Pain control and physical therapy
Even though pain after surgery is present in variable degrees, it can be effectively controlled with medication.

Your physical therapist will help you to control your new knee. Your knee may be aided with a continuous passive motion exercise machine that will subtly bend and straighten your knee. While you rest, you can also pedal your feet in order to encourage efficient blood flow in the legs.

After discharge
Your stay at the hospital may last for 3 to 7 days after surgery depending on how well you have progressed.

Before your discharge, you must be able to perform the following tasks:
* Bend your knee at a right angle and/or show adequate progress in straightening and bending the knee
* Get in bed and out of bed without any help
* Walk with a walker or crutches

You may have a mild swelling following your discharge. This can be treated with elevating the leg, applying an ice pack for 15 minutes and wearing a compression hose.

You must continue the prescribed exercises for at least two months after your total knee replacement surgery.

To tone your muscles and maintain the flexibility of your knee, low-impact exercises such as riding a stationary bike can help.

What can you do at home?
For several weeks, you may need some help with your everyday activities. If sufficient help is not available, you may have to join a rehabilitation center.

You can also follow these tips to make your home more comfortable:
* Shift your room if you live on an upper floor in order to avoid using stairs
* Rearrange your furniture so you can walk with crutches without any interference
* Get rid of any rugs and unwanted cords to prevent falling
* To avoid bending too far use devices with long handles

Nutrition
After discharge, you should be able to resume your normal eating habits. Your doctor may also recommend taking vitamin C supplements to help in the absorption of iron in the body. Make sure you drink plenty of fluids and try to limit your intake of caffeine or coffee and alcohol.

Avoid consuming too many foods with vitamin K, such as green beans, lentils, garbanzo beans, soybeans, soybean oil, Brussels sprouts, broccoli, cauliflower, kale, spinach, turnip greens, lettuce, onions, cabbage and liver, while taking blood-thinning medication.

Your vitamin K intake should be the same every day while you take blood-thinning medications as too much vitamin K can interfere with the medications and risk to blood clotting. Watch your weight as well in order to prevent excessive stress on the joint.

Author Bio:
This article was written by Jeff from www.BodyHeal.com.au, Australia’s premier physiotherapy and sports injury rehabilitation store. Visit their sports injury blog for more valuable information. Feel free to contact him through the website.

Thank you, Jeff! Hope this helps others going through the same thing.

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The Anesthesia Diet

Nowadays it seems almost everyone is looking for a way to lose excess pounds.  Well, forget about being concerned about what to eat and not eat, how to exercise, etc.  Have a major surgery and reap the benefits of anesthesia – I lost 10 pounds without trying.  I call it the Anesthesia Diet.

Now my clothes fit, I look younger, and I can chuckle about it. This is a true story. 🙂

ADDENDUM TO ORIGINAL PUBLICATION….11/11/2013:
It seems this post has been found on numerous “diet” and “weight loss program” sites. Apparently, many consider this a viable solution for losing weight. WHAT??!!!

Please…this original post was written as a joke. There is no way in blazes I would recommend having a major surgery as a way to lose weight. Get real..

If you want to lose weight…..WORK AT IT!!!

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Easy Balancing Exercise For TKR Folk

Hi my favorite readers! Recently, a number of you have contacted me and expressed balance concerns. Us total knee replacement folk need to rebuild our balance. This tkr blog post is about an easy balancing exercise for us to do. It also applies to anyone wanting to improve their balance.

I have written about this topic previously, but thought it was appropriate to share again.  The exercise starts at the zero balance level. It worked for me, so it may work for you. You don’t need any fancy equipment, either. All you need is a firm chair and a flat surface

STEPS:

  1. Stand behind a firm chair, like a recliner or sturdy kitchen table variety. Place one hand onto the chair’s top. This will be how you support your body weight. You may find it easiest to face the chair and place both hands onto its top.

This stance is perfect for those wanting complete security during this balancing maneuver. You can also stand with either your right or left side against chair. Use one hand to hold onto the chair. The choice is yours.

2) Gently lift your right foot from the floor. Only lift it as far as you are comfortable with. Doing this will shift/place all your body weight onto your left leg. Keep holding onto the chair.

3) Hold this position for five to ten seconds, whatever is comfortable. Slowly lower your foot to the surface. Rest for 10 seconds. Repeat this maneuver 10 times.

Do the exercise again by lifting your left foot.

This exercise will gently strengthen your muscles until you reach the point where you can stand on one foot without any assistance.

If you’re like me, getting your balance back involves continuous, very small steps. It feels strange to place all your body weight onto your tkr leg. Do not rush this entire process. Doing so increases your risks of injury. And…we don’t want that.

Hope this helps others going through the same thing.

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