total knee replacement

Stop Comparing Yourself To Other TKR Patients

Hi everyone. Even though it is a good idea to read about other total knee replacement patients and their experiences, please remember that we are all different. Stop comparing yourself to other tkr patients. Everyone recuperates at their own pace. And, everyone went into their total knee replacement surgery with a different background, different experiences. Some have experienced trauma, others aging issues,   and some have a combination of the two (like me).

My tkr is the result of a car accident which happened 45 years ago. There was trauma to my knee and entire leg. The main leg injury was a fractured femur (thighbone). At the time, the doctors said I had arthritis in my knee as a result of my knee smashing against the dashboard. I was told then that I would not really have any problems until 30 years down the road. As a 21 year old, I thought…”Yeah, ok. That’s when I’m old.”  So, here I am 40+ years later, living with a total knee replacement.

I am mentioning this since my tkr recuperation has added concerns as compared to the typical osteoarthritis (aging) concerns. That is the way it is and I accept that. I don’t compare myself with others and neither should you. There is no point in doing that. It can   result in feeling inadequate.

Recently one of my readers suggested having a flexion contest among the tkr readers/patients on my blog. I love that competitive spirit and found her enthusiasm refreshing. However, I would not stack up at all, and I’m not going to try to. While other tkr patients are striving for 115-135 flexibility range (kudos to you all!), I am not in the same ball park. I’m not your average bear.

Even though gauging yourself against other tkr patients will give you a general idea about experiences, comparisons between flexibility and activities is just not a good idea. That’s my opinion, anyways. For instance, I know that to “graduate” from physical therapy, 95 was the flexibility target goal for me. I saw other tkr patients, at the same time period of my surgery, with 115-120. I started to feel inadequate since I was struggling to reach 95. And, that was with my physical therapy lady pulling and pushing on me so hard I could have screamed loud enough for Asia to hear me. 😕 (I live in USA)

The only comparison you need to make is with yourself. All you can do is keep bettering yourself. Remember your pre-tkr flexibility and activity level. Then, compare it to how you are after your surgery. In my case, my flexion remains about the same as prior to my total knee replacement…90-95  And, I may never have more than that. My doctor told me to be prepared for that fact based upon my prior medical experience.

I believe it is important to mention this since comparing yourself with others can make you doubt your own accomplishments. What good is that? Anyone diligently working (doing their exercises) after a total knee replacement surgery needs to be proud of what they have accomplished. Do not doubt yourself.

So, when you hear of or see other total knee replacement patients with their desirable activity level, impressive flexion degrees, and other aspects you want to have – remember we are all different. You do not know their background. Stop comparing yourself to other tkr patients.

Good luck!

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AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other health concerns.

This award-winning site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author, tkr blogger, and tkr patient who has been living with various health conditions for over 45+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.

Have You Had These Post-TKR Symptoms?

Hi everyone. I recently received a call for help from Nancy, who is trying to help her sister out. Here is her comment:

“I am so glad I found your site! my sister ( 70s ) just had a knee replacement and she started feeling flu like symptoms. achey , an tired, and going from cold to hot. is this anything you have ever heard of ? its been one month.


Its not her knee that is that painful now.. its the other effect.s.
she went to Dr and they took Ekg… and her heart was rapid… and pulse was going up and down.


she does have anxiety.. Can you please see if anyone else has these symptom s that you have heard of?
I thank you so much ..”

END OF COMMENT…

Have you had any of these post-tkr symptoms? If so, please feel free to share your insight so Nancy and her sister can begin to relax.

Thanks in advance! Find this tkr blog post about post-tkr symptoms interesting? Kindly share…

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

This award-winning site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various health conditions for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.

Humorous Quotes to Ease The Pain After A Total Knee Replacement

Hi everyone. Actually, I put the total knee replacement term in the heading so that search engines will like it. These quotes will work for anyone looking for a good chuckle. So, here are some humorous quotes to ease the pain after a total knee replacement.

While riding my upright bike during my total knee replacement (aka tkr) recuperation, I was lucky enough to catch two classic cartoons on the Cartoon Network. Being a classic animation fan, I about fell on the floor (figurately, not literally) when I found out I turned the television on just in time to catch Yogi Bear. And, following that show…POPEYE!!!!! Woohoo!!!

Here’s the scenario:

Yogi and Boo Boo were walking in the forest looking for their cave.
Boo Boo: “We’re lost, Yogi.”
Yogi: “We’re not lost, Boo Boo. We just misplaced our cave!”

I’ll remember that quote next time I get directionally challenged while driving. 🙂

Popeye didn’t have any memorable quotes this time, but watching him eat his spinach left me with a hankering for some of the green stuff. Plus, it just never gets old hearing him say how something is “embarrasking”.

Here is an older NHL hockey-related quote. While watching the New York Rangers V Boston Bruins game video the other night, a big deal was made because Sean Avery was playing. So, of course, the media needed to interview him. He was asked something to the effect of why he is so disliked in the NHL (I didn’t hear the exact question). I did hear his reply, though.

“Even a mild aversion to Sean Avery is not that….chuckle while searching for the correct wording…”mild”, Avery replied. Good one! 🙂

Hope these quotes brought a smile to your face and a chuckle to your belly. Humor heals. That is especially true during our trying COVID-19 times. Stay safe and healthy!

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AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other health concerns.

This award-winning site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author, tkr blogger, and tkr patient who has been living with various health conditions for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.

Marie is also a proud WEGO Health Patient Leader.

Using Recliners As A TKR Exercise

Hi everyone. Recently, I had the privilege of communicating with one of my readers who shared some insight into sleeping after a tkr.  It involved using recliners as a tkr exercise.

This just goes to show that everyone is different during their recuperation process. Personally, recliners were far too uncomfortable for me to use during my first six months post-tkr. Even five years after a tkr, some of these furniture pieces are too difficult to use.

Here is the scoop:

Sit upright in the recliner. Put it into the reclining position. Use either a handle or arm strength to perform this maneuver. Whatever the chair requires.

Return the recliner to its upright position. This is where the tkr exercise comes into play.

Do this by applying pressure with your tkr leg. Push your heel and calf into the chair. You’ll definitely feel the backside of your leg working. That is your hamstring muscle(s).

DON’T DO THIS DURING YOUR INITIAL TKR RECUPERATION STAGE. And…when you do it, do it at your own risk. I’m not responsible for any mishaps that may occur.

It works for me because I take my time and have control over the situation. I know myself. It may not work for you.

Hope this helps others going through the same thing.
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AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

This award-winning site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author , tkr blogger, and tkr patient who has been living with various health conditions for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.

Marie is also a proud WEGO Health Patient Leader.

Shoe Lift Fitting & A TKR

Something interesting happened while at the doctor’s office recently that I thought was worthy of sharing. It involves my shoe lift fitting and a tkr. Here is an excerpt from my upcoming ebook:

My tkr leg is shorter than the other, a topic I have written about in previous posts. Well, while being measured for a new shoe lift, I was continually asked “how does it feel?”  And..that’s where the strangeness begins.

How is one supposed to know how  it feels if there is no joint to feel with? I was totally perplexed. Before my tkr, it was easy to know how my knee felt since I still had a knee. It may not have been operating as “normal”, but I still had a joint that told me how everything was and felt.

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

This award-winning site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author, tkr blogger, and tkr patient who has been living with various health conditions for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.

Marie is also a proud WEGO Health Patient Leader.

Meal Preparation After A TKR

Hi everyone. Literature regarding preparing for a total knee replacement states that for a time period after this arduous surgery, patients will need to have help in many areas. One area is meal preparation after a tkr.   I’ll vouch for that…

The first week after my tkr, it was very uncomfortable to stand up for longer than a few seconds. And, the crutches I needed to walk with added to the concern. It could be worse, yes, but I definitely agree it makes for an easier recuperation to have someone else do this task.

After the first week, there are ways to do it on your own. As much as I love eating plain steamed veggies, the task of preparing the veggies was too cumbersome for me. Heck, just filling the ice bag took everything I had. 🙁 So, I needed to make some changes. Here’s what worked for me:

Frozen vegetables. There is a reason for frozen vegetables. They came in VERY handy during my tkr recuperation and meal preparation. Either microwaved or poured into a steamer – quick and easy. The less time I spent standing in one position, the better. You are likely the same.

Frozen entrees. Formerly known as “tv dinners”, there are so many varieties and brands to choose from – it’s easy to find something that suits your palate. Plus, the nutritional value is decent.

All you need to do is remove them from the box, poke the plastic film, and pop them in the microwave. When done, just dig in. Quick and easy to the max.

Crockpots. I swear by these and have loved mine for more years than I care to admit to. 🙂 All you need to do is put in a piece of protein (like chicken), a washed and cut baked potato, and whatever other veggies you want. (If you don’t have the energy for the potato, just put in some rice with a little bit of liquid).

Of course, frozen veggies are the easiest. Sprinkle with some Italian seasoning, put on the lid, cook, and you have a great meal. It probably takes about 5 minutes to prepare.

There were (still are) times when I’d fill my crockpot with water, add some split peas, herbs, and frozen veggies. Cooked at high for about 4 hours is all it took to give me a deliciously easy and tasty bowl of soup.

Frozen fruit. These are marvels for not worrying about spoilage. Just take a handful out and add to some yogurt or simply pour into a bowl and enjoy.

Hope some of these meal preparation suggestions help you during your recuperation from a total knee replacement. The first couple of weeks is the most difficult. If you’re like me, the less time standing – the better.

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AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or a number of other health concerns.

This award-winning site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.

Marie is also a proud WEGO Health Patient Leader.

Total Knee Replacement Clicking: Do You Have it?

Hi my favorite readers! Here is a reprint of a popular post I did a couple of years ago that has received very positive feedback. Quite a few readers have asked to read it again…so here it is. Enjoy! Total knee replacement clicking: do you have it?

I have had a number of readers relay information to me that I find quite interesting. It seems that there is a major concern with their bionic knees making clicking sounds.

My tkr does click every now and then, but nothing serious.The majority of the time I have no problem with any sound that could be interpreted as a total knee replacement clicking.

However, sometimes I do  feel something similar to that of taking a sheet of aluminum foil and wadding it up. My bionic knee sometimes   “crinkles”.

It is a difficult feeling to describe. I cannot hear it, either. And, when I put my hand over my tkr knee, I cannot feel this “crinkling” or clicking happening.

I just wanted to bring it up since I know others who have had a total knee replacement are having similar experiences as mentioned above.

Anybody else have similar experiences they would want to share?

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AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other health concerns.

This multiple award-winning site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author, tkr blogger, and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.

Marie is also a proud WEGO Health Patient Leader.

 

Telltale Signs You May Need A Total Knee Replacement

Hi everyone. Many of you have been contacting me wondering whether it’s time for a total knee replacement. Even though I am not a medical professional, I can provide personal insight into how I decided it was time. Hopefully, you will find some useful information from my personal experiences. Here are some telltale signs you may need a total knee replacement:

Resharing/reprinting from March 2017:

Cortisone shots wears off quickly.
When I first approached a surgeon about having a tkr (total knee replacement), cortisone was recommended as an alternative. The recommendation was having a shot every three months to ease the pain and stiffness.

The results were immediate. I walked out of the doctor’s office without any pain or difficulties. I was happy as a clam in mud. That is, until two weeks later when the cortisone wore off. At that point, I was back where I started.

Pain killers lack effectiveness.
What used to provide some level of relief, suddenly does not. Since I do not take any prescription medications, I used over-the-counter remedies. They became a waste of money as my knee cartilage disappeared and my pain level increased.

Knee locks up.
This can happen anywhere, any time. The pain is unbearable. For me, sometimes it took a few minutes to “get back to normal”, other times it took 10-20 minutes.

Walking aides are needed.
My knee locking up was why I started carrying crutches with me everywhere. You may find a cane is easier. Whatever the device, extra precaution is part of everyday life to remove the stress from your damaged knee.

Excessive pain in everyday movements.
Everyday movements include walking, sitting, standing, and laying become more difficult and painful.

Difficulty crossing legs.
No longer do I take crossing legs for granted. Do you find yourself looking at people with their legs crossed, admiring the fact they can do it? It may be time to take action.

Need assistance getting in and out of chairs.
Assistance can be another person, a chair arm, or a mobility-impaired recliner. Whatever it is, using your leg the usual way will become difficult.

Favoring “good” leg.
This is a common behavior. My “good” leg is able to do everything the ”normal” way, so why not take advantage of that? I found myself putting all my weight on my undamaged leg. This leads to further damage.

Looking for stair alternatives.
Ah, stairs. Instead of viewing stairs as exercise, suddenly they turned into torture devices. I was always on the lookout for alternatives. Alternatives included elevators and/or escalators. Whenever I did use stairs, a railing was necessary. And, it was not a pretty site.

Body realignment is required.
Do you find yourself having to adjust your body before moving? You may have to realign your spine, wait for your knee to get in place, and/or do some stretching. Whatever it is, getting up and going is not an easy task.

Well, that’s all I can think of for now. Hopefully, you have found my how to tell insight useful to aid your total knee replacement decision-making process.

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AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

The site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.

Marie is also a proud WEGO Health Patient Leader. Learn more here: https://www.wegohealth.com  

 

How Does A BMI Fit In With a TKR?

Hi everyone. Another topic some of you have recently approached me with is “How does a BMI fit in with a tkr (total knee replacement)”? Good question. Since I am not overweight, I thought I would do some research to answer this question to the best of my ability. So…

I was surprised to find out what I have known for years about information on the Internet still exists. Only before, the websites dealt with businesses like construction, fitness equipment, real estate, music tools, and other tangible products/services. Not something as personal and heavily-regulated as medical procedures. What did I learn?

There will be three websites all discussing the same topic. In this case, the topic is BMI affecting a tkr. Only this time, all the sources were reputable, scholarly articles found on NCBI, WebMD, Science Daily, various university sites, etc. All results came about from extensive studies.

RESULTS: One website has one viewpoint. Another website has the exact opposite viewpoint. And, the third is a combination of the two.

How Does A BMI Fit In With a TKR? Well, it is up to your doctor/surgeon. Online research provides no insight whatsoever.

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AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

This healthline.com award-winning site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a WEGO Health Patient Leader, published author, and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.

Total Knee Replacement Support Groups – Where Are They?

Hi everyone. Some of you have contacted me asking where to go for total knee replacement support groups. In addition to sending private replies, I believe sharing the information with as many readers as possible will do the job. So..total knee replacement support groups – where are they?… Read on…

Check with your hospital. Hospitals offering this surgery want their patients to have positive outcomes. They likely will offer free total knee replacement support groups to help you before and after your tkr surgery.

Check with your local YMCA. Many sites offer a variety of support groups. Some offer onsite rehab services, also. Ask around to find out more. If they do not offer them onsite, they likely will refer you to someone/some place that does.

Check in with online sources. This site – Booktoots’ Healing – has been rated one of the best online total knee replacement sources by Healthline.com for many years. People come here to gain further insight and to support others. Take a look around to realize you are not alone.

Click on this link to be taken to the Healthline.com site to learn more about online sources that can provide total knee replacement support:

https://www.healthline.com/health/total-knee-replacement-surgery/best-blogs#1

Good luck and keep in touch!

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AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

This award-winning site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.

How To Naturally Heal TKR Scars With Food

Hi everyone. Scars seem to be a common subject among you, my favorite readers. I just got done reading an interesting article on how to best heal scars the natural way. Knowing what a doozy we all have, I thought it would be fun to write a post about how foods can be used to naturally heal a tkr scar.

Personally, I like my tkr scar. It’s healed just fine. Nine years after my total knee replacement surgery, it has blended in well. In part, I believe, is the fact I eat a lot of fresh fruits and vegetables. Food is my healing agent.

Below is some information that provides insight into my reasoning. My data comes from personal experience as well as backup content from the American Dietetic Association. Here goes….

Vitamins that can benefit scar healing are high in antioxidants. The antioxidants are essential for healing of wounds/scars. These include Vitamins C, E and A. I’ll talk about Vitamin C now, for no particular reason other than it’s fresh on my mind. Here goes…

Vitamin C is found in more vegetables than you probably imagine. It is found in dark leafy vegetables such as spinach, mustard greens, collard greens and various dark-colored lettuces (like red leaf).

The vitamin is also found in winter squash, green peppers, broccoli, brussel sprouts (or mini-cabbages as some know them) and cabbage varieties.

If you have a sweet tooth (which fruit can satisfy), you’re in luck. Vitamin C is found in berries such as raspberries, blackberries, strawberries, marionberries, blueberries and huckleberries. Citrus fruits like oranges, grapefruit, lemons and limes are also rich in the vitamin.

Mango, watermelon and pineapples are other sources that contain ample amounts to help in skin healing. Snacking on a mango..oohlala! Mixing some fresh fruit into plain yogurt is another option…:)

So you know, I’m talking about the fresh varieties of fruits and vegetables. Personally, I’m not a fan of canned foods, but they do come in handy. One occasion involves using them in my minestrone soup base when ripe fresh ones are unavailable.

It’s also nice to have some canned food on hand for emergency power outages or the like. For everyday/consistent eating, though…no. Nothing beats a freshly steamed pot of veggies and serving of protein.

Well, hope this helps others going through the same thing. Take action to start naturally healing any total knee replacement scars. Remember… You are what you eat.

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AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

This award-winning tkr blogger site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.

How To Safely Maneuver Stairs, Steps and Ramps

Hi everyone.  As you all know, having knee issues presents a unique set of concerns regarding everyday life. One main issue is conquering elevated surfaces.  Here are some helpful suggestions on how to safely maneuver stairs, steps and ramps to minimize knee stress.

Back by popular demand..here is a previous post:

Test the Area
First and foremost, do a safety check. Not all stairs, steps, or ramps are created equally. Check the surface material. Is it wet, dry, asphalt, cement, rubber, etc.? The material will determine your caution level and the type of footwear needed.

Before starting any attempt, make certain you are comfortable using the surfaces. The step may be thicker (steeper) than the standard version we learned to use during tkr recuperation. It may be narrower, have rounded corners, or contain uneven surfaces. All of these factors matter.

For instance, the steeper the surface level, the more physical exertion needed. Rounded corners are easier to misjudge.

FOR UPSTAIR MANEUVERING

Use Railings
I know this is common sense, but I have seen people too proud to use these helpful devices. Forget pride. Hold onto these with a firm grip whenever possible. They were developed for a reason. Always make certain they are securely attached to the wall before using to prevent injury.

Walk Sideways
Instead of taking the surface head-on, turn your body sideways. Place your “good” leg on the surface, then lift your body up until you are firmly on the surface. Don’t rush it. You will feel your quadriceps working.

“One Small Step”
Instead of alternating legs like you would when climbing stairs, place your “good” leg on the surface. Lift your body up until your knee is straight and supporting your body weight.

Gently lift your tkr (or hindered) leg and place it on the surface. Stand upright. Repeat this until you reach the top of the stairs, steps, and ramps.

To visualize this method…, you will be standing (full body) on a stair, step or ramp before moving to the next one.

Use a Cane or Crutch
This may take more time, but what’s the hurry? Remember that it is always better safe than sorry. Place the walking aide in your nonaffected-side hand. Hold firmly and apply pressure to lift your body weight up onto the stair, step, or ramp. When done correctly, your arm muscles will get a good workout.

FOR DOWNSTAIRS MANEUVERING

Walk Backwards
Turn your back to the stairs, steps, or ramp. You may feel strange, but forget what others think. Hold onto the railing, if available. Very slowly start walking backwards, one foot before the other.

When done correctly, you will feel your hamstrings (back of knee) muscles working while doing this maneuver to conquer stairs, steps, and ramps.

Walk Sideways
From personal experience…Avoid this method if you wear an external shoelift unless you have strong ankles. For all other interested parties, conquer the elevated surface by pretending you are a crab. Go slow and be successful.

Well, that’s all that comes to mind now about how to safely maneuver stairs, steps, and ramps. Do you have any suggestions on how you conquer these walking surfaces? We would love to hear from you!

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AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

This award-winning site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various health conditions for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.