Shortness of Breath As A Symptom

Hello everyone. It’s always interesting to read about taking care of your health and what the “experts” say. Sometimes it can bring on more questions than answers, though. The topic I will discuss here involves having shortness of breath as a “symptom”.

Start reading about heart disease and related heart problems. A common indication is listed as having shortness of breath. Articles recommend contacting your doctor when you find breathing difficult.

Many times, shortness of breath can signify more serious health conditions. This is according to studies by the American Heart Association, National Institutes of Health and others.

My question is, what if a person has a fractured C-1 included in their medical history? (A fractured C-1 is a fracture of the first cervical vertebrae. The cervical area is located in your neck. In layman terms, a fractured C-1 means you “broke your neck”. )

FYI: When I discuss the topic, I use the wording C-1 since the “broken neck” phrase is creepy. Anyways.. A fractured C-1 usually results in breathing difficulties.

Here is my question: What if a person lives with breathing difficulties for the majority of their live? My cervical fracture, for instance, happened 40+ years ago.

How is one supposed to tell whether it is a symptom of heart disease or just a part of life? This is truly perplexing to me. I certainly am not running to the doctor every time I have shortness of breath. I’d keep the profession in business.

My shortness of breath occurs daily. To some extent, it exists.

I am just pondering here. Anyone have any answers they would like to share?

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Why Not Ask A TKR Survivor?

I am confused and frankly, frustrated, with things I have been reading. While doing research into bones, healthy knees, knee replacement, etc…I came across a recent study done by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

The study was done about the impact of certain activities upon an artificial knee joint. Four artificial joints had measuring devices in them and were implanted into four separate patients. The findings were presented to the audience, etc.

Instead of wasting money on studies, did anyone ask tkr recipients? No. A survey could have been conducted requesting tkr patients to provide feedback. What better way to get information than from actual patients? That’s my opinion, anyways.

If someone would have asked me about playing golf after my tkr, I could have told them of the increased stress. Due to that discomfort, I am not golfing anymore. The golf swing is quite stressful on my tkr joint and entire body. Some other individuals may differ. I wrote another post about this on this site.

And, now there’s a study involving four implanted patients that is surprising the medical community with the findings. Interesting…

For more information, here’s the link:

http://www6.aaos.org/news/Pemr/releases/release.cfm?releasenum=662

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