How To Find Motivation to Exercise After A TKR

Hi everyone. Usually, it is easy to back out of exercising. Many people continually make excuses about why they don’t exercise. However, I want to share some great ways on how to find motivation to exercise after a tkr. Read on…

Be diligent in doing your exercises while recuperating from your total knee replacement and you will get excited about what used to be difficult when moving your body. Why? You will reap your rewards. Here’s my take on the issue….

* You will love how thrilling it is to be able to walk without pain.

* It is great to have what is known as a ‘normal’ walking gait without walking aides.

* It is fantastic to be able to walk fast enough to get out of breath and work up a sweat. (To some this would be “speed walking”. I like to think of it as walking faster than I did prior to my tkr.)

* It is wonderful to be able to walk trails, take in the scenery, and smell the air without feeling any joint pain.

* It is a nice feeling knowing that you are getting the most out of your total knee replacement surgery.

* It is so welcoming to have clothes fit better. I know, in my case, there were times when my dryer shrunk too many clothes. 😕

All of these combine to provide motivation in staying with, or starting, an exercise program.

Hope this helps you get motivated to exercise after your tkr (or any time, for that matter).

Always remember to be grateful you can walk.

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AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.







Early Morning Stretches For A TKR

Hi everyone. I have received some inquiries lately regarding ways to reduce stiffness upon waking in the morning. Seems many of you are like me and need to start using some early morning stretches for a tkr. These are also good for anyone else. So…here are some of my faves that may work equally well for you:

Forward Ankle Stretches
While still laying in bed, gently move your feet so your toes are facing the ceiling. When done correctly, you will feel a stretch in your hamstrings (back of leg).

Hold this favorite of early morning stretches for five seconds. Slowly return to original position.
Repeat as many times as desired.

Toes Away Stretches
Work your upper ankle region by gently pointing your toes away from you. Feel the stretch in your arches, ankle, and tibia areas. Hold for five seconds. Slowly return to original position and repeat as needed.

Ankle Circles
The title is self-explanatory. While still laying in bed, start making circles with your ankles. You can do one at a time or both simultaneously. Do this slowly and gently to avoid undue stress.

All-Body Stretch or Cat’s Meow
Have you watched a cat wake up? The stretch is something to behold.
Do your own by laying on your back in bed. Start by lifting your arms overhead while pointing your toes away from you.

Slowly and gently turn your torso to the left. Hold for a few seconds. Repeat this maneuver to the right side.

When done correctly, this will feel like a natural maneuver that gets the blood flowing.

Hope these exercises are as beneficial for you as for me. Feel free to share any feedback below. 🙂

Find interesting? Kindly share….

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.







Rated One of the Best Total Knee Replacement Blogs of 2017

Hi everyone. I am proud to announce that this blog has been rated one of the Best Total Knee Replacement Blogs of 2017 by Healthline.com. I am humbled and honored. This accomplishment would not be possible without the support of you, my readers. Thank you!

Some of you voted for my site. Others willingly leave comments to share experiences, show support, and/or join the community in other ways. However you got involved, you played a part. 🙂

For more information about this accomplishment and others who received this recognition, kindly click on this link:

Best TKR Blogs of 2017

Do you find this interesting? Kindly share with others…

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.







TKR: What Does Your Knee Look Like Afterwards?

Hi everyone. I have received quite a few questions about what to expect after having a tkr or total knee replacement. What does the typical knee area look like? What did mine look like? At the two-year mark, I wrote the following post. It still applies at the 8-year post-tkr mark…fyi.

It finally happened. It’s been 25 months since my tkr and I’ve been looking at a swollen, flat knee area. Well, the other day, I took a close look at my knee. While laying down, I lifted my knee straight up to check it out. (Remember how difficult that is when first recuperating from a tkr? I sure do..) For the first time, there is a definite indentation along the inside of my tkr knee area. The area on the opposite side has a slight indentation also. The upper portion of my tkr still looks a little swollen. My surgeon said it would probably always be like that. No biggie to me.

I was curious to see how my leg looked while I standing up. The entire area surrounding my knee appears wrinkled. Big time wrinkles, like someone in the Florida sun for 30 years. There was still definition, but it appears slightly less. The swelling appears more intense when standing up. Actually, the swelling looks more like fat. Oh well. It could be worse.

Hope this helps others going through the same thing. What does your tkr knee look like?

Find interesting? Kindly share….Remember, we’re all in this together…

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns. The site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 30+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.







Foot Cramps & A TKR

Hi my favorite readers! I’ve received a number of comments from many of you about cramping after a tkr. I don’t feel so alone regarding this topic since it seems to be a common occurrence. It seemed an appropriate time to update previous replies.

I also experience foot and toe cramps. Mine occur within the arch area of either foot. Sometimes they extend into my middle toe on my non-tkr leg. On my tkr side, the cramp usually occurs in my big toe.

It is always painful and unexpected. To alleviate the pain and cramp intensity, if possible, I massage the area. If it’s not possible to immediately massage the area, I simply stand up straight and use positive affirmations. That actually works. I do not panic. Panic increases pain levels. I know because when I first started having cramps, I did panic. And…OUCH!!!!!!!!!!!!

When I am able to immediately massage the area, I tell myself “it’s not that bad”, “it’s OK” as I gently rub the area. When the cramp goes away, I stand up straight and gently walk to my destination. If possible, after massaging, I elevate the leg.

I also find it helpful to eat bananas daily. Sometimes more than one.

A very good exercise for alleviating foot pain involves a tennis ball or similar size ball. Sit upright in a comfortable chair. Put the ball underneath your affected foot. I find it particularly helpful to have the ball directly under my arch area.

Slowly begin rolling your foot over the ball. Apply enough pressure to provide a mild massage. Do this movement for as long as comfortable. When done properly, you will feel the pressure points of your feet getting a workout. You will probably find yourself smiling. 🙂

Hope this helps others going through the same thing.

Find interesting? Kindly share…Thanks!

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns. The site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 30+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.






It’s Two Years Since My TKR

I just re-read my 20-month post tkr post. Nothing much has changed, actually. There is one change, however. Now that I have reached the two year point, I do not have to take antibiotics whenever I go to the dentist. That’s great, in my opinion.

I attribute my success to the fact that I have diligently exercised every day. Starting out it was the rehab-type exercises. We all know the tremendous amount of work involved in doing that. I enjoyed it, however. I’ve always enjoyed exercising. I feel frustrated and “fat” when I don’t do some sort of exercise for at least 30 minutes daily. I also eat a healthy diet.

I have been very fortunate that I have not had any infections or other ill health along the way. My scar has healed wonderfully. In fact, it’s a trophy of sorts. 🙂

My prosthesis is obviously the correct size. After reading comments from other tkr patients, I feel very fortunate with this.

My knee clicked for only a couple of weeks. I wrote a blog post about that. I haven’t had any problem with that since.

Stairs are still a big bite. Going downstairs is more painful. Going upstairs is more of a strain on my “good” knee. I’m not overweight, either.

If I sit in a traditional office-style chair, it is not fun getting out of it. After sitting in the chair for about 15 minutes, it usually takes a few minutes for my tkr leg to adjust and “straighten out” upon standing up. It can be very painful. I believe this is related to my extensive nerve damage. (I’ve written another post about that. Nerve damage was caused by bone spurs).

When using a public restroom, the height of the toilet seat is a concern. Most times I need to use the hand rails. If there are not any, I look around for something else to hold onto. If there is nothing to hold onto, I wish I was a male… (they can stand and take care of their #1 business…my attempt at a joke).

If I bend my tkr beyond a certain point, it is extremely painful. I just don’t bend it beyond that point. (Remember that joke..”Hey, doc..it hurts when I do this,” says the patient. “Don’t do it” replies the doctor.)

It is painful when I first start to ride my stationary bike. My tkr does start to “warm up” after about two minutes.

My tkr swells up a bit when exercising more than about 30 minutes. The swelling is no where near what it was during my recuperation exercise process. Sometimes I put ice on it, other times I don’t. It’s not that big of a deal.

I can walk without the pain associated with pre-tkr functioning. I can function on a daily basis without that level of pain. The thrill of that cannot be described in words.

My tkr has about 115 flexibility. That’s better than it was prior to my tkr. I’m not worried about it.

I can kneel, but it is very slow and deliberate. And, it’s uncomfortable. I only do it when necessary. And, it’s done on a cushioned surface.

I don’t participate in any impact sports or perform any sudden movements of my tkr. There’s a snow tubing expedition coming up that I wouldn’t feel comfortable with. Snow shoeing is doable, though. 🙂

My “good” knee makes crunching sounds regularly. This occurs when I go up stairs or just walk. That’s not what I want to hear.

My “good” knee also swells up and is a bit tender after exercising or doing stairs. That’s not what I want to see.

I can lay flat and my tkr leg will settle into position without much pain. Somedays it takes longer than other days. No big deal.

I can sleep through the entire night. That’s right. It does happen, just takes a LONG time.
I can even sleep on my tkr side without pain. Usually, though, it is painful to stand up after laying on that side.

Well, that’s all I can think of now. Overall…all the PAIN, sleepless nights and frustration of having a tkr is worth it to me. Not once during the original recuperation did I regret having the surgery. Not once since have I regretted it.

Hope this helps others going through the same thing.

Find interesting? Kindly share…Thanks!..

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 30+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.






Five Months after a Total Knee Replacement

Hi my favorite readers! Well, something great happened today.  I was icing my knee after an hour long walk when I noticed something.  I could see the outline of my kneecap (patella)!  That means that my swelling is starting to go down, and I could actually feel my knee cap for the first time since my surgery.

It’s amazing how the small things in life can be so important. 🙂

There is still a ways to go, but….woohoo!! Hope this helps others going through the same thing.

Find interesting? Kindly share…Thanks!