7 Ways to Speed Up Your Knee Replacement Recuperation

Hi my favorite readers. Many of you have approached me recently inquiring about ways to make the tkr recuperation easier. There is no simple approach, unfortunately. Sharing one of my more popular posts regarding this topic may help you. Good luck!

Having a total knee replacement surgery is only part of the process. Always remember that. How you deal with the recuperation to actually use your new knee is another part. It, actually, is the hardest part. Only you can determine the extent of your success.

  • Here are some ways I have noticed an improvement in my total knee replacement recuperation. My knee is getting better every day because of them. They may work for you. Here goes…

    * Every hour on the hour, get up and walk around. Even if it is for only a couple of minutes. You need to stand up and get your blood flowing. Your level of recuperation (and physical therapist) will determine whether you use a walking aide or not.

  • *Do as much as you can for yourself. Lower your reliance on others when you can easily do it yourself. You will only be hurting yourself.
  • *Know that it will be painful. You cannot get around having pain after a major surgery. Bummer.

    *Take a pain med prior to your exercise. I find that ½ hour beforehand works best for me. This will help make your exercise regimen go easier. Of course, your pain meds will decrease as time goes on and your level of recuperation increases. The sooner the better, I say.

    *Set a goal for your knee flexibility. Find a ‘hash mark’ on the floor that you want to stretch your foot to. Lift your leg farther than an earlier attempt. Your physical therapist can help with this.

    *Keep icing. After every exercise bout, ice your knee area. The best is a simple ice pack. Or, frozen peas and carrots work well.:)

    *Elevate. Keep your leg elevated when not exercising. This helps the healing.

    Recuperating from a total knee replacement takes work, time and effort. Stay with it and you will only benefit. Remember to check back here often to realize that you are not alone.

    Find interesting? Kindly share…

    AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

    This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.







    How To Lower Your Risks of Falling

    Tips on How to lower your risks of falling

    Hi my favorite readers! While recuperating, and preparing, for a total knee replacement it is important to prepare your living area to help avoid falls. Here are some helpful tips on how to lower your risks of falling. They apply for everyone, not just a total knee replacement person.

    This is also an excerpt from my ebook titled…”Preparing for a Total Knee Replacement”.

    * Remove all loose rugs that do not have a nonstick backing. If possible, duct tape the rugs to the floor – if desired.

    * Remove all loose rugs, period. Sometimes, depending on your balance, crutches and walkers will have a hard time getting around the edges of loose rugs.

    * Remove all cords from the floor. If you don’t remove them, make certain that you can maneuver around them without causing any distress.

    I have known people who didn’t look down while walking and tripped over cords that easily could have been avoided had they watching where they were walking. 

    * Be careful and aware of your surroundings. It is crucial for fall prevention.

    * Watch out for small animals. They have a tendency to run under your feet quickly and without warning.

    * I recommend not having any small animals (considered hazards) around for the first week after surgery. Do your part in fall prevention and total knee replacement instances.

    * Don’t reach for anything above your head.  It is too easy to lose your balance this way.

    * Don’t drink alcohol. If you simply must have it, consume minimal amounts. This is common sense, but it does affect one’s balance.

    * Don’t lean to either side while on your crutches or walker. Keep your body weight evenly positioned. Remember to keep a square, safe reach area around you. Again, you will lose your balance too easily if you don’t.

    It is easy to avoid falling while recuperating from a total knee replacement if you prepare both yourself and home beforehand. Be successful by using these how to tips. All are tried and true.

    Hope this helps others going through the same thing.

    Find interesting? Kindly share…Thanks!

    AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

    This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.






    Stairs as a Knee Replacement Exercise

    Hi everyone. When working on gaining flexibility in your knee, a great exercise is to walk up and down stairs. Going up is much easier than going down.

    Part of the recuperation process after a total knee replacement involves a variety of exercises involving stairs or steps.

    The first movement in my case was to simply stand up and lift my leg onto a step. I say simply, but it was definitely not easy. It took all the energy I had. (TKR surgery involves cutting through the quadricep muscle, the largest muscle in your leg.)

    Then, lift our body weight onto your tkr leg.

    Place your “good” leg onto the step/stair.

    Hold this position for five seconds.

    Return to the original position.

    Rest for 10 seconds.

    Repeat five times. Slowly increase your time and repetitions.

    Do this maneuver with the aid of crutches, at first. Then, eventually, all that will needed is the aid of railings or parallel bars.

    It is not easy, but once it starts working out….it’s great. Hard work pays off.

    NOTE: You may want to start this exercise by placing your tkr leg onto a step, lifting your body up until your knee is straight, and then lowering yourself back to the original position.

    AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

    This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.







    What Exactly Does “Pain Med” Mean?

    Personal insight into what “pain med” actually means.

    Hi everyone. After almost three months of recuperating from a total knee replacement surgery, I have finally figured out what is meant by “pain med”. At first, I thought it meant that the medications were supposed to alleviate pain completely. That just was not so. What exactly does “pain med” mean?

    In fact, no matter what type I was given, there was still pain. Sometimes the pain was unbearable. It always existed in some form. So, I resigned myself to the fact that a pain med just doesn’t work.

    Then, I ran out. I didn’t think it as any big deal. Usually, I took one pain med one-half hour before my pt or exercise.   Well, this time I just went for a walk thinking “What’s the use of a pain med, anyways? The term is joke.” Wow….what a difference! The pain was intense after finishing my exercise routine. I could hardly move my leg.

    So, the verdict is….pain meds help take the edge off of pain. They decrease the pain intensity. They do not totally eliminate pain, as some (like me) would think.

    Find interesting? Kindly share…

    AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

    This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.







    Happy Holidays!

    Hello everyone and Happy Holidays! I’m taking a short moment to extend greetings to everyone visiting my site and participating in it. This site would not be as successful without everyone’s comments and insight. Thank you.

    It’s that time of year when festivities abound for a variety of religious and/or spiritual beliefs. So…to satisfy everyone..

    .Happy Holidays!!

    Enjoy responsibly. Hoping the New Year brings everything you desire and want. Remember that your health is your greatest asset. Keep improving! 🙂

    Find Interesting? Kindly share..







    One Week After A Total Knee Replacement

    Hi everyone! Have you recently undergone a total knee replacement? Are you wondering what others in your similar situation are going through? I know some of you are, since you have contacted me. You have been asking for an article I wrote discussing what happens one week after a total knee replacement.

    Here goes…

    It’s been a week since my total knee replacement. Considering that it’s a major operation, it just amazes me how my tkr recovery has me I’m up and around. There’s a lot of swelling of my foot and knee area. It goes down a bit with ice.

    Every hour, I get up and walk around. In addition to developing my knee muscles from the surgery, I need to retrain my muscles to be used ‘normally’. See, for the past 30 years, I’ve been wearing a shoe lift. This means that I haven’t been walking from heel to toe. Rather, my gait has been from plop to toe.

    The pain upon first rising, either in the morning or after sitting, is unbearable. Once I begin to move, though, it gets better. Prescribed pain meds are ineffective for me. They usually get me nauseated. So, I don’t take any.

    Muscles are meant to be used, and it’s interesting to see how they develop and/or rebuild one week after a total knee replacement. Painful, but interesting. Don’t ask me to repeat that next time I stand up, though.

    Once finding out I needed a home therapist 3x/week, I didn’t think it was necessary. Now, I’m glad it’s happening. On our first meeting, she showed me new ‘tricks’. I’ve already told her that she is known to my friends as “the torturist”. Her reply to that? “PT stands for pain and torture”. That’s funny.

    My PT lady just came and went. She eliminated an unbearable amount of pain simply by stretching my newly aligned muscles. Right on, PT lady. 🙂

    Hope my tkr blog insight about what happens one week after a total knee replacement helps others going through the same thing. Do not give up. It does get better!

    Find interesting? Kindly share my tkr blogger story…Thanks!

    AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

    This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.

     

    Shoe Lifts: Little Known Benefits

    Hi my favorite readers! Wearing shoe lifts, whether they are noticeable or not, provides many benefits. It can be easy to focus on the negative, but what’s the point in that?

    I previously wrote about being grateful for my 1.5 inch shoe lift. And..seeing that the post received such positive feedback, I thought I’d talk about it again. Enjoy!

    Some may think that wearing shoe lifts is a hindrance. After all, not everyone wears one and the wearer could be on the receiving end of some strange looks. I know since I have been wearing a noticeable external lift for 42 years. I am still sensitive to the strange looks I sometimes get.

    Part of my recuperation from my tkr includes having to adjust my shoe lift thicknesss. That is a process I hope none of you have to go through. Anyways, that is why I have figured out reasons to be grateful for wearing these beneficial orthotics.

    Puddle Conquering. Depending upon the thickness of a shoe lift, puddles can easily be walked through. Your shoe will not get wet, unlike your regular shoe. This statement applies to shallow streams, also. Your feet will stay dry.

    Self Defense Tool. If someone starts to give the wearer a hard time, shoe lifts can be used to place a heavy kick to the groin. The extra weight will make for an extra punch.

    This maneuver only applies if you can lift your leg high enough to get a good kick in, though. Your leg muscles may not be strong enough. If you have difficulties lifting your leg, give a good kick to the shins. Ouch!

    Convenient Bug Squasher. The extra weight of shoe lifts can provide for an easy elimination of bugs that are otherwise hard to kill (such as immensely oversized cockroaches known as Palmetto bugs. Eww..!!).

    All you need to do is get a quick whack! or stomp in and the little critter will be saved a lingering death. Plug your ears in case the critter has a hard shell. You do not want to hear the crunch..believe me. Be sure to apologize to them before the killing process, though. They usually do not mean any harm.

    It Improves Mobility. Of course, the best reason for wearing a shoe lift is the fact that it improves your mobility. It balances out your musculoskeletal system and gait. As a walking aide, it makes getting around easier and less painful.

    There’s nothing funny about this. Just a plain and simple, hard, cold fact. It has helped out tremendously since my total knee replacement.

    Hoping this helps others going through the same thing. Do you have similar stories to share? Feel free to post your comments….

    AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

    This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physical conditions for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.

    Find interesting? Kindly share…







    Eight Year Post-TKR Update

    Hi everyone. Has it already been eight years since my total knee replacement, otherwise known as a tkr? You bet it has. February 2008 was when I had this surgery. So..it is time for an update.

    KNEE FLEXIBILITY. My knee flexibility is still around 90-93. It is due to previous scar tissue dating back 30 years. The degree is about what it was prior to my tkr. I have written about this in numerous posts throughout my site. It is of no concern to me.

    LIMITED PHYSICAL ACTIVITY. Due to the hindered flexibility, I am unable to ride a typical bicycle. Or, let me say that I can do it, but not at the speed to keep the bike and me upright. My body tilts to the right since my left tkr knee does not bend fully. Am I painting a proper picture? I hope so. I can use a stationary bike, but it certainly is not a pretty picture. 😕

    TKR CLICKING. Just within the past two months have I noticed a regular clicking of my tkr. Before this, there was sporadic clicking during my initial stages of recuperation. Now, it happens daily. It is a curious event. There is no pain. Sometimes there is a sound, other times not. I guess ‘bizarre’ would be the best word to describe it.

    TKR SWELLING. Only after being on my feet or sitting for an extended period of time do I notice any type of swelling. I simply elevate the leg, rest, and maybe apply ice.
    By ‘extended time’, I mean about three to four hours. It does vary.

    TKR PAIN. Pain occurs on such a minimal level, that I feel embarrassed to mention it. Again, when overdoing it, my tkr may be painful. I take an aspirin, elevate, and ice.

    OPPOSITE HIP PAIN. I have noticed an increase in pain involving my opposite side hip recently. It may be due to my shoe lift being the incorrect size. It increases when doing stairs.

    STAIRS. Speaking of stairs, if a slug and I were taking the stairs at the same time, the slug would finish first. I take my time while holding the rail. Going up is more painful than going down. Going down, however, is more difficult.

    That is about it for now. If I think of anything else, I will be sure to update this eight-year post-tkr update.

    Hope this helps those of you going through the same thing. If you find this post interesting, kindly share it with others. Thanks!

    AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns. The site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 30+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.






    Why It Is Important To Make Exercise A Priority..

    Hi everyone! We probably all have days when we do not feel like exercising. It seems like a hassle, takes too much time, etc., etc., Here’s a piece of news that can make exercising seem less daunting….I believe it’s all based on aversive training….

    Envision yourself in the hospital due to inactivity. That doesn’t seem like fun, does it? Picture yourself hooked up to a breathing device where you cannot talk, even if you wanted to.

    Imagine yourself having one medical test after another, being poked with needles so many times you dread even seeing the medical professional.

    Imagine yourself lacking so much energy, it takes everything to simply blink your eyes (it does happen..).

    Picture an IV in your arm. Whether it is for nourishment or medication, this IV is playing an essential role in restoring/assisting your health.

    Imagine having to urinate through a catheter for any reason associated with poor health. This catheter needs to be changed, cleaned/sanitized, and reinserted. It’s an arduous, time-consuming process that takes a toll on anyone’s nerves and confidence.

    Imagine yourself being put on a very restricted diet to bring your weight back in line. Weight gain is far too common when exercise does not play a key role in your lifestyle.

    Or…picture yourself being given so many medications you cannot possibly start your day without popping pills.

    How does all that sound? It’s very negative. That’s the purpose of this article. But, believe me. It does happen. Your body requires exercise to operate properly, and, it’s simply amazing to hear how many people believe exercise is too time consuming…or whatever the excuse. And, the longer you go without exercising to maintain your body in decent condition, the more situations negatively accumulate.

    Of course, there will be a day or two when it is okay to just sit back and let your muscles recuperate from a previous workout. There is nothing harmful about taking small breaks.

    Get out and exercise. Stop making excuses. Find an enjoyable way to do it. Choose from a number of activities to lower boredom levels.
    * Do some isometrics while watching television. How easy is that??!!
    * Take a gentle yoga class for mild, yet effective, stretching.
    * Lift some milk gallons filled with water, as a dumb bell alternative.
    * Find a friend to exercise with, join a class, go to your local pool, buy an exercise video or Wii Fit (I think that’s what it’s called…).

    No matter what the method is..

    ...EXERCISE. It’s fun!!

    Find interesting? Kindly share…








    Sharing A TKR, Dog, and Stairs Story

    Hi everyone. It seems there are a number of dog lovers among us. It’s always fun regaling stories about how they impact our lives. Sharing a tkr, dog, and stairs story to bring smiles to your souls.

    Doing stairs seems to be a common concern with us tkr folk. Some can do them with ease. Others cannot do them at all comfortably. And, still others, can do them but it’s not a pretty site. I fall into the latter category.

    Well…I walk downstairs, but at a slow and careful pace. I definitely need railings. Going upstairs is doable, but slow going. Recently, I received some insight into what I must look like to others – even the four-legged kind.

    At the time I was dog sitting a Doberman Pincher. He is a beautiful, friendly, and boisterous creature, for sure. At first he would walk downstairs with me, kind of like the buddy system. Then he realized that I was going too slow. He began to stand at the top of the stairway and wait for me to walk down first. As I walk downstairs and reach the ground surface, I turned and looked up at him.

    I notice he is looking at me with his head tilted.  It’s quite entertaining, seing the look of perplexity in his eyes. He’s probably wondering, “What’s up with that?” He would stand there for a few moments with his tilted head and wondering eyes focused on me. Then, he would merrily walk down the stairs and join me at ground level.

    You kind of had to be there to completely enjoy the experience. 🙂 It brightened the entire stairs episode, for sure. Pets are cool.

    Hoping my sharing a tkr, dog, and stairs story brings a chuckle to your soul and massage to your innards.

    Find interesting? Kindly share…Thanks!

    P.S. This brings back memories of his large dog bark. That’s what a dog should sound like. However…I didn’t know him that well. My only experiences with a Doberman were the attack dogs from movies and media. So…one day he’s in the kitchen….

    He starts vigorously barking and hurriedly running in circles. I’m freaking out. What’s going on? Is he so hungry he’s going to eat me? (When standing upright, his back came up to my waist. He was one BIG dog.) Does he have to go to the bathroom? I wasn’t warned about this behavior. What’s going on?

    So…I offer him some treats. He sniffs, but keeps running in circles. His barking intensity increases. Then, I open the outside door. Woah…he makes a mad dash outside as if there’s no end in site. He needed to relief himself. Whew…I was saved. My flesh remained intact.
    End of story…

    AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

     

    This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 30+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.