Carrying Things Upstairs After A TKR

Sharing personal insight into carrying things upstairs after a tkr – total knee replacement.

Hi everyone. It’s always nice to hear from you. Recently, I have received many inquiries about carrying things upstairs after a tkr – total knee replacement. Throughout my tkr recuperation I looked for ways to make climbing stairs easier and more manageable. Here is my personal insight worth sharing on my tkr blog…

Upon entering the house, I place all bags onto the stair’s base level (floor). I then walk up one stair at a time. I reach down and pick up the bags with one hand, grab onto the rail with my other hand, then swing the bags (no..there’s no eggs involved) onto the stair 2-3 higher.

This tkr blogger repeats this process until I reach the entry door.

I  discovered this process after numerous times of carrying all the bags in both hands while ascending the staircase. This was difficult. The bags seemed heavy. Then when I’d get to the top of the tkr stairs (SEO phrase), I’d be sweaty and out of breath. Plus, my language would not have made my mother proud. 🙁

Where’s Popeye? He could do anything. I bet he would make carrying things upstairs after a tkr seem like a breeze.  🙂

Hope this helps anyone else going through the same thing.

Find interesting and helpful? Kindly share…

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout the pre-op, recuperation and beyond stages. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physical concerns.

This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.

Remembering Our Worth

Tips for Remembering our worth are especially important during tkr recuperation, illness, or any difficult situation. Read for further insight…

While going through past posts, I came across this one discussing the importance of remembering our worth. This is especially written for the women among us.  While dealing with illness, tkr recuperation, or other difficult situations, it is easy to forget how worthy we are. Enjoy…

The One Flaw In Women

By the time the Lord made woman,
He was into his 20th day of working overtime.
An angel appeared and said,
‘Why are you spending so much time on this one?’
And the Lord answered, ‘Have you seen my spec sheet on her?

She has to be completely washable, but not plastic,
have over 200 movable parts, all replaceable
and able to run on diet coke and leftovers.

She must have a lap that can hold four children at one time,
have a kiss that can cure anything from a scraped knee to a broken heart
-and she will do everything with only two hands.’

The angel was astounded at the requirements.
And only two hands!? No way!
And that’s just on the standard model?
That’s too much work for one day.
Wait until tomorrow to finish.’

Continue reading “Remembering Our Worth”

Walking Sticks and A TKR

Hi everyone. Recently, I have heard quite a bit about how helpful walking sticks were for exercise purposes. Some of you have asked me about them, also. So, I have used them on some of my daily walks. They were OK, but not something I would want to use regularly. They did come in handy on another event, though…

Scenario:
It was during a hike. The expedition was originally presented to me as a 5-mile round-trip beach walk. No problem, I thought. Hah!! It turned into a 8-9 mile round-trip walk in the woods, going through old growth forests. (I think the technical term is backwoods.)

One of my hiking companions had a couple of walking sticks. She was praising the benefits of the sticks and swore she wouldn’t go hiking without them. Her ankles were giving her problems. Plus, she mentioned how the sticks helped her balance.

When I asked her how they worked, she gave a demonstration. She put the stick down into the ground and it went all the way down to the handle. See…parts of this trail were big time mud traps. It was a hilarious sight, and I burst out laughing. Luckily…she was not hurt and did not fall.

A while later, another portion of the hike involved going down a muddy trail. When she offered one of her sticks, I took her up on it. I am glad I did. There was no way I could have made it down that decline without the aid of the stick. The stick kept me from falling and definitely game me support.

Moral: Getting used to the walking stick was the hard part. Once this hurdle is overcome, it really is an asset to have around. It has come in handy on numerous occasions, other than hiking.

Conclusion:
So, for anyone interested in using a walking stick after a tkr..I highly recommend it. I’m not getting paid to say this or writing any reviews. This handy device just makes walking and hiking so much easier, especially on questionable terrains.

Hope this helps others going through the same thing.

Find interesting? Kindly share…

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.







How To Lower Your Risks of Falling

Tips on How to lower your risks of falling

Hi my favorite readers! While recuperating, and preparing, for a total knee replacement it is important to prepare your living area to help avoid falls. Here are some helpful tips on how to lower your risks of falling. They apply for everyone, not just a total knee replacement person.

This is also an excerpt from my ebook titled…”Preparing for a Total Knee Replacement”.

* Remove all loose rugs that do not have a nonstick backing. If possible, duct tape the rugs to the floor – if desired.

* Remove all loose rugs, period. Sometimes, depending on your balance, crutches and walkers will have a hard time getting around the edges of loose rugs.

* Remove all cords from the floor. If you don’t remove them, make certain that you can maneuver around them without causing any distress.

I have known people who didn’t look down while walking and tripped over cords that easily could have been avoided had they watching where they were walking. 

* Be careful and aware of your surroundings. It is crucial for fall prevention.

* Watch out for small animals. They have a tendency to run under your feet quickly and without warning.

* I recommend not having any small animals (considered hazards) around for the first week after surgery. Do your part in fall prevention and total knee replacement instances.

* Don’t reach for anything above your head.  It is too easy to lose your balance this way.

* Don’t drink alcohol. If you simply must have it, consume minimal amounts. This is common sense, but it does affect one’s balance.

* Don’t lean to either side while on your crutches or walker. Keep your body weight evenly positioned. Remember to keep a square, safe reach area around you. Again, you will lose your balance too easily if you don’t.

It is easy to avoid falling while recuperating from a total knee replacement if you prepare both yourself and home beforehand. Be successful by using these how to tips. All are tried and true.

Hope this helps others going through the same thing.

Find interesting? Kindly share…Thanks!

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.






Announcing Updated Preparing For Total Knee Replacement EBook

Hi everyone. I am pleased to announce the third printing of my popular ebook titled ‘Preparing For A Total Knee Replacement’. Content is recently updated.

A total knee replacement can be one of the most trying and tiring of surgeries to undergo. Preparing properly can save you time, frustration and money.

After going through the entire ordeal myself, I decided to write this ebook to help others. It is intended to share rare situations. Nowhere did I read or hear about what to do if the doctor cancels on surgery day due to sickness, cancels another date, and reschedules the surgery another month later. This happened to me.

I needed to go through the pre-op medical process twice within a two-month period – for the same surgery. In fact, two pints of my own blood were discarded like trash. That’s a harrowing experience.

Let my insight make your life easier. I provide you with a first-hand account about how to get all areas of your life prepared for your tkr surgery.

I know that getting ready for a total knee replacement is more than just scheduling a surgery date. It is more than sitting in support groups and talking. It involves taking action.

The available information given by the doctor’s office was/is written by the medical profession. I found the information helpful, but lacking some key points. A patient’s perspective was needed.

I now know how things could have been easier if I was better informed/prepared. After hearing from my blog readers, I knew there were others out there who could benefit from my first-hand experience. That’s when I decided to write my ebook.

This ebook is especially helpful for those not having access to support groups or insight from people who had the surgery. Instead of relying on conflicting Internet information, you can be relieved in knowing that my information is tried and true.

Purchase
You can purchase the book directly through me by visiting my Books Page. Or, click here:
Preparing For Total Knee Replacement Surgery Ebook I accept Paypal and will send the book in PDF format as soon as possible.

Thanks for your time and hope to hear from you soon!

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.






How To Find Motivation to Exercise After A TKR

Hi everyone. Usually, it is easy to back out of exercising. Many people continually make excuses about why they don’t exercise. However, I want to share some great ways on how to find motivation to exercise after a tkr. Read on…

Be diligent in doing your exercises while recuperating from your total knee replacement and you will get excited about what used to be difficult when moving your body. Why? You will reap your rewards. Here’s my take on the issue….

* You will love how thrilling it is to be able to walk without pain.

* It is great to have what is known as a ‘normal’ walking gait without walking aides.

* It is fantastic to be able to walk fast enough to get out of breath and work up a sweat. (To some this would be “speed walking”. I like to think of it as walking faster than I did prior to my tkr.)

* It is wonderful to be able to walk trails, take in the scenery, and smell the air without feeling any joint pain.

* It is a nice feeling knowing that you are getting the most out of your total knee replacement surgery.

* It is so welcoming to have clothes fit better. I know, in my case, there were times when my dryer shrunk too many clothes. 😕

All of these combine to provide motivation in staying with, or starting, an exercise program.

Hope this helps you get motivated to exercise after your tkr (or any time, for that matter).

Always remember to be grateful you can walk.

Find interesting? Kindly share…
AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.







8 Factors Affecting Air Quality and Breathing

Hi everyone. Some of you are noticing difficulties breathing and have asked me about my situation. Other than what I have previously written about, I have come up with 8 factors affecting air quality and breathing that can easily be passed along. So, from first-hand experience….

Smoking/vaping – anything associated with nicotine. I don’t care how vaping is marketed, it’s nicotine carried via vapors. Symptoms may not be as quickly noticeable as tobacco smoking, but it still pollutes the air.

Tobacco. My body is super-sensitive to tobacco in any form. Whether it be second-hand smoke from cigarettes or cigars, smokey rooms, breathing someone’s tobacco breath, or any similar situation – I react.

Body odor. No description needed. Please.. soap, water, and effort is all it takes.

Bad breath. No description needed on how this affects air quality and breathing.

Cologne/body fragrances. Au naturale has my vote. I hope there’s not a commercial fragrance with that title.

Cleaning agents. Many commercially-prepared agents affect air quality. Start using natural sources like bleach, baking soda, and/or vinegar for results at a fraction of the cost. It’s amazing how a little baking soda on a wet cloth can scrub away grime.

Scented candles. Some more than others affect air quality and breathing.

Dust. Not everyone is sensitive to dust. I am. I once ended up with horrendous symptoms by attempting to sleep in a room full of dusty 40-year old collectibles.

My guests did not understand my breathlessness, migraine, nausea, vomiting, and sluggishness. I never stayed there again.

Well, I think that’s enough for now. Air quality does affect breathing, to some extent. Depending upon your individual situation, you may have it better or worse.

Remember, there are many more reasons that your breathing may be negatively affected. I recommend performing a Google search for health information on this topic, if interested.

Hope this helps others going through the same thing.

Find interesting? Kindly share….Thanks!

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.







Breathing Is A Gift: Treasure It

Hi everyone. Do you every think that breathing is a gift? It is so easy to take it for granted when all is going well. Here is a real-life story to provide more insight into why you need to treasure it.

As many of you already know, I fractured my C-1 (first cervical vertebrae) in 1975. One of the after effects is breathing difficulties. Shortness of breath is a daily occurrence for me ever since. There are many trigger points that enhance its impact.

Improper pillow. You probably see commercials about the importance of having a comfortable pillow. Have you ever noticed how difficult it is to buy a good-fitting, comfortable pillow? I have. The process is termed..PITA. If you don’t know what that stands for, just …as the saying goes…GOOGLE it.

Pillows can seem so worthwhile in the market, while feeling them up. It’s only when getting home and actually using them that the truth comes out. Either too full, too flat, too fluffy, or too cumbersome.

The wrong pillow affects my breathing. It may affect yours, as well. This occurs when the vertebrae are misaligned. Pain shoots everywhere from my head to my toes. (Especially my neck.) A misaligned neck makes breathing very difficult. It hinders sleeping, also. Not good….

There are many nights when sleeping on folded towels is the solution. Or, simply laying flat. Flatness provides instantaneous relief. Nice…

Mattress. A good mattress makes all the difference, also. Pillow-top versions do not feign well with spinal alignment. Some consider these versions “romantic”, not me. Give me a firm mattress any day and twice on Sunday.

Regularly rotating and turning the mattress will help even out mattress wear-and-tear. A mattress that needs rotating will cause spinal misalignment – hence, shortness of breath.

Poor posture. This is common sense, but must be mentioned. The older I have gotten, the more I realize not everyone has common sense. Shortness of breath occurs more often when my neck is misaligned.

Poor diet. After 40+ years of living with daily shortness of breath, I know for a fact that processed foods, in particular, hinder my breathing. It may be the preservatives, excess sugar/fat/additives, or handling. Whatever it is, I minimize my usage of these “foods”.

Stress. Isn’t stress the cause of many health problems? You bet it is. Whatever shape or form it takes, excess stress hinders breathing. I would think we all share that dilemma. It’s only when realizing it that we can change it. Sometimes it is much easier said than done.

OK…I think that’s enough for now. You may be wondering why I choose to write about breathing on a blog that mainly discusses total knee replacement concerns. It is because I have been experiencing increased bouts of shortness of breath lately. I blame it on the pillow. It also happened during my tkr recuperation.

Hope this helps others going through the same thing.

MORAL OF STORY: Never take your breathing for granted. There are those who would give almost anything for the delight of effortless breathing. Breathing is a gift…Treasure it.

Find interesting? Kindly share it….

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.

Living With Severe Neuropathy & a TKR

Hi everyone! I have been receiving numerous inquiries regarding sciatica, nerve pain, and other pains associated with a tkr or total knee replacment. The timing is ideal since I have been experiencing high levels of neuropathy pain. Here’s the scoop that I trust will provide further insight…

As I have written about in other posts that prior to my tkr, bone spurs were digging into my nerves. They were severing my nerves. (The nerves are located alongside the lateral portion of my knee.)

Prior to my tkr, I had to readjust my entire body in order to compensate for this extreme pain.

What is interesting is that almost 10 years post-tkr, this neuropathy pain can be excruciating at times. I know that my situation could be much worse, but believe it
is worthy of sharing with you.

The level of discomfort is simply noticeable and potentially hindering. I do not know when it will happen. It is unpredictable.

There are times when the neuropathy leads to my entire tkr leg tingling. Sometimes there is pain, other times there is not. It is the strangest feeling.

Right now, I am sitting at a computer using proper ergonomics, and I feel my lower leg tingling all the way down to the ends of my toes. I straighten my leg and the tingling diminishes. Other times I straighten my leg and the tingling continues.

I always like to pay particular attention to activities happening when the pain and/or tingling occur. I do notice that the neuropathy pain occurs when lifting any amount of weight. Even carrying some grocery bags does this.

It sometimes happens when I am swimming. It can happen when standing for more than 5-10 minutes. These are just some situations that pop into my mind as I am writing this article.

How do I ease the pain? I try my best to find stress-reducing body positions. Some work one time and not another. I lightly massage the area. This provides temporary relief, usually.

There are several yoga stretches that help, like the pyramid pose. Touching toes, downward-facing dog, and camel pose all provide relief, also.

And: Elevating my leg works some times, not all the time. In short, my remedies provide unpredictable results. I take aspirin, but dread popping pills for a number of reasons.

Hope this helps others going through the same thing. Find interesting? Kindly share with others who may benefit. Thank you!

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.






Knee Braces & A TKR

Hi everyone. Some of you have asked me if I have tried using a knee brace prior to having a tkr (total knee replacement). The answer is “yes”. Here is my story about knee braces and a tkr…

Prior to my total knee replacement, I tried everything I could to avoid the pain. One thing I did was wear a knee brace. It was painful and I didn’t understand why. That is, until I saw an x-ray of my knee.

I had bone spurs on each side of my knee that had developed due to my knee being bone-on-bone. I have written other blog posts about my bone spurs. Here is some more insight…

A knee brace stabilizes the knee joint by compressing the muscles. I can see how a brace would work for many people with knee concerns. However, the muscle compression caused my bone spurs to dig into my nerves more than usual. That compression, in turn, resulted in increased pain.

The knee brace did keep my knee joint better aligned. I can see why many people find them helpful. Knee braces may be great for others, but they did not work for me. It just goes to show that everyone is different. You may be the same.

Hope this insight helps others going through the same thing.

Find interesting? Kindly share with others…

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.