Thank You Booktoots’ Supporters…

Hi everyone. It’s that time again to say “thank you” for visiting and playing an active role in helping this site succeed. I have a very deep appreciation for all you do. Whether it is reading through the posts, commenting about your current situation, or encouraging other readers, thank you for taking time out of your day to participate.

Best of luck to everyone. Please share the news about this site with others you know could benefit. We are all in this together!

Find interesting? Kindly share. Thank you…

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physical conditions for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.






Vestibular Exercises: A Fun Way To Improve Your Balance

Hi everyone! For years I have been doing balancing exercises to maintain my vestibular system health, overall body alignment, and good health. This is due to years of double vision, closed head injury, leg length discrepancy and other conditions. I’m not your average bear. I’m better looking.

You may already know this, but the vestibular system is where your inner ear is located. The health of this system determines how well your balance is, your overall level of well-being, and how engaged you are in everyday activities. Wow…see how it’s important to keep it healthy? That’s only a very simplified description, too.

Anyways…I found an easy and safe way to regularly do some balancing exercises. It involves the water.

For a little background information: Vestibular rehab exercises typically involve sitting upright on a bed. Then, the exercise has you quickly fall to your left and stay in that position until you’re not dizzy. Slowly return to the sitting position. Repeat this exercise to the right.

A chair-based exercise involves sitting with your feet firmly planted on the surface. You keep your eyes open and quickly turn your head to the right. Keep it there until all dizziness subsides. Slowly return to center position. Repeat exercise to the left.

For more information, feel free to visit the Vestibular Disorders Association website at:
https://vestibular.org

These are good for land-based maneuvers. (Good, but NOT fun.) But…who wants land when water is available??!!

Recently I was in the swimming pool. I thought it would be fun to quickly do some log rolls. What could it hurt? I couldn’t fall. That’s the benefit of water exercises. 🙂 It worked out perfectly. It was a fun way to exercise my vestibular system.

And yet another reason you need to start heading into the water and working out. The water’s buoyancy naturally supports your body weight, making it impossible to fall. You could be the clumsiest person in the world, but the water doesn’t care. It’ll lift you up. 🙂

You say you’re afraid of water? Many people are. I’ll keep my tongue in check, but quickly say that it’s nothing to be ashamed of. A number of YMCAs offer swimming lessons to introduce others to the wonders of water.

Remember to keep your vestibular system in good shape to improve your longevity and overall health. You’ll be glad you did.

Find interesting? Kindly share…Thanks!

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns. The site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 30+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.






There Is Nothing Funny About Double Vision

Hi my favorite readers! Recently, something came to my attention that I believe is worthy of sharing with everyone. It applies to public misconceptions. The topic is living with double vision. I started experiencing double vision as a result of a head injury I sustained almost 40 years ago.

Years ago I learned to not discuss certain things about myself until I knew someone rather well. One topic in particular was double vision. In medical terms it’s known as strabismus (“lazy eye”) which results in diplopia. I found that whenever I talked about it with “the general public”, jokes were everywhere. And…all types of misconceptions existed.

Popular songs used double vision as a sign of being so in love you “couldn’t see straight.” As an example that immediately comes to mind…Foreigner does one song, I believe it’s titled “Double Vision.”

Movies have regularly depicted this condition as entertainment. “Double Vision” is used to define looking at twins, having a fungus taking over an evil mind and other depictions.

In real life, there’s nothing funny about living with double vision. Period. As much as I believe in the importance of finding humor in every situation, when someone finds out I have double vision and then asks me (while laughing) how many of them I can see…I go along with it at first. Then, if they ask again …it’s not funny. My eyes have to work to focus on anything. Sometimes it can be tiring. It can be frustrating. I can feel it. This applies even with my prism.

Depending upon the severity, double vision can result in loss of balance, nausea, headaches, mental confusion and other ailments. What’s funny about that?

Anyways, thank you for listening to my rant. I only wish the general public was more understanding about living with double vision. Those living with vision concerns completely understand. All I can do is spread the word to hopefully increase awareness among the misinformed.

Find interesting? Kindly share…Thanks!

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns. The site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 30+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.






Rubber Band Feeling & Pain Relief

Hi my favorite readers! I’ve written about breaking in my new shoe lift and spraining my ankle in the process before. Yikes. A couple of days ago something interesting happened that I felt worthy of sharing. It highlights the importance of exercise.

While sitting on the sofa, I noticed that my tkr-side ankle (the one I sprained) did not flex as much as my healthy ankle, especially while moving my toes away from my body. Plus, it was still painful. Interesting. I started doing more ankle stretching exercises including circles and pointing maneuvers.

A couple days later while on my daily walk, I was moving my tkr leg forward and settling my foot onto the pavement as part of my usual gait. Suddenly something feeling like a rubber band (I don’t know how else to describe it) moved back and forth all the way from my ankle to the outside of my knee. It was a comforting type of pain, but very unusual. I stopped walking for a few seconds then slowly started walking again. Suddenly, my ankle flexibility increased and pain diminished.

Upon finishing my walk, I showered and settled into a comfortable position on the sofa, ready to watch my hockey playoff game. I propped up my ankle, as usual, and started doing my ankle stretches. Sure enough. I could point my toes further away from me than before the “rubber band occurrance”. Wow…

I’m not a medical professional, but somehow, those stretching exercises paid off. It took a while, but …woohoo!!!

Hopefully this helps others going through the same thing.

Find interesting? Kindly share..Thanks!








Living With Double Vision

Hi everyone. Part of the reason I have not posted in a few days is the fact I’ve been involved in scheduling an eye surgery. Of course this involves eye appointments. Holy Mackerel. As grateful as I am for everything, by the time the eye exam is done…I just want to sleep. 🙂

A couple of weeks ago I finally received a diagnosis I could understand. See…34 years ago I was in a car accident in which I experienced numerous injuries. One was a closed head injury that was a result of my head hitting the dashboard and going through the windshield. This head trauma caused a weak muscle and damaged nerve in my left eye. I was told then that I would have diplopia (double vision) for the rest of my life. This diplopia originally started on my right lateral.

For years I needed to be super careful about what I ate and drank. I wore regular eyeglasses. I noticed that if I consumed caffeine or too much salt, my diplopia worsened. It also worsened when I’d eat anything with MSG (monosodium glutamate) in it. (Remember, this is before MSG was the health concern that it is today. In fact, it was sold in the spice section of grocery stores. I loved the stuff and was disheartened when I realized I could not eat it. 🙁 ) I noticed that when my hormones were unbalanced, so was my diplopia. As time as progressed, I find it very interesting that whenever I have told an eye professional like a M.D. or D.O. (or whatever the initials for an optometrist are) about the effects of foods and/or hormones on my diplopia (and there have been many times)….they find it entertaining and treat it lightly. They cannot believe anything like that effects my condition. Hmm…I wonder if a naturopath or acupuncturist would. ?? Just curious.

I didn’t know about eye glass prisms until 8 years ago. I don’t know if prisms existed back in the late 1970’s. I wasn’t made aware of them if they were. They’re great. I can see straight. That is until about six months ago. My diplopia has affected all of my visual fields. Now…I see double even while wearing my glasses. And, my prism cannot get much stronger.

The diagnosis…after the completion of my eye exam, my ophthalmologist told me I have a nerve palsy affecting the nerve surrounding my cerebellum.. As she described the nerve, its location sounded perfectly aligned with where my head injury occurred. I was impressed. Impressed, yet scared. Suddenly I have a palsy. Isn’t it funny how you can live with a condition for so long and just learn to deal with it and suddenly when it’s given a name ….it’s viewed differently? I find that interesting, anyways.

So..instead of wearing glasses that will look abnormal and accentuate my vision defect, I am going to have the surgery. I thought I wasn’t vain, but I don’t want to wear glasses with tape and stripes across the entire lens. My diplopia has reached the point where I want it fixed. I just want to see straight (or as straight as possible) when I open my eyes in the morning. Plus, I want the headaches and overall tiredness to stop. Eye problems are a physiological strain upon the body. And…that’s an understatement.
So…that’s the scoop. Thanks for reading.

Hope this helps anyone else going through the same thing.

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Living With Diplopia

One of the consequences of my car accident, 33 years ago, is the fact I sustained eye damage from my head hitting the dash and then going through the windshield. This resulted in a damaged nerve and weak muscle in my leg eye.

Due to this, I have lived with diplopia (double vision) for this entire time period. Only ten years ago did I find out that there was a prism available for eyeglass lenses. (I wear glasses). The good part about it is, I know what makes the symptoms worse. So, I avoid these triggers.

Upon recuperating from my car accident enough to where I could function in society, I went to an ophthalmologist about what to do regarding correcting my double vision. I was told that there was a surgery available. Good news. However, it consisted of cutting a healthy muscle in order to align my eyes. No so good news. I like to keep my healthy muscles.

This is a chapter excerpt from my upcoming book about living in a body cast for two years.

Find interesting? Kindly share…Thanks!

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns. The site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 30+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.






Book Writing Update

Still working on the book, adding more chapters and remembering facts to be put into chapters.  Just wrote a chapter about living with diplopia – double vision.  There are songs written about it and jokes made about it, but I don’t find anything funny about it.  I’ve learned to live with it, and be grateful I can see.  There are corrective prisms, which are inserted into eyeglass lenses, that can correct it.

Cool…wish I knew about those 20 years ago. 🙂