How To Find Motivation to Exercise After A TKR

Hi everyone. Usually, it is easy to back out of exercising. Many people continually make excuses about why they don’t exercise. However, I want to share some great ways on how to find motivation to exercise after a tkr. Read on…

Be diligent in doing your exercises while recuperating from your total knee replacement and you will get excited about what used to be difficult when moving your body. Why? You will reap your rewards. Here’s my take on the issue….

* You will love how thrilling it is to be able to walk without pain.

* It is great to have what is known as a ‘normal’ walking gait without walking aides.

* It is fantastic to be able to walk fast enough to get out of breath and work up a sweat. (To some this would be “speed walking”. I like to think of it as walking faster than I did prior to my tkr.)

* It is wonderful to be able to walk trails, take in the scenery, and smell the air without feeling any joint pain.

* It is a nice feeling knowing that you are getting the most out of your total knee replacement surgery.

* It is so welcoming to have clothes fit better. I know, in my case, there were times when my dryer shrunk too many clothes. 😕

All of these combine to provide motivation in staying with, or starting, an exercise program.

Hope this helps you get motivated to exercise after your tkr (or any time, for that matter).

Always remember to be grateful you can walk.

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AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.







Five Year Post-TKR Update

Hi everyone. Many of you have asked about my five year post-tkr update. Here is a reprint of my original article, originally published March 7, 2013.

Wow..five years have already passed since my total knee replacement surgery. As the saying goes..”where has the time gone?” Anyways, it’s time for a tkr update. Thanks for reminding me of this. I am a success story for a tkr, and grateful for it.

* Nothing much has changed since my last update, actually. I am in good health except for my bionic knee.

* My knee still swells up when I overdo it. Sometimes it hurts, other times it does not.

* I can kneel, but not with as much flexibility as my “healthy” knee. That’s no big deal since I couldn’t really do that prior to my tkr surgery.

* I can walk without pain. That’s a crucial improvement, when compared to before surgery.

* I still am not on any medications. Considering my age, and the feedback from heavily prescribed friends, I am very proud of that fact.

* Sleeping is no problem at all. How grateful am I for that?! 🙂

* Flexibility is around 93. That’s what it was prior to my tkr. Once again…no biggie. I would absolutely not have a manipulation done. Never even considered it. If someone else wants to do it, that’s their business.

* Sitting is fine as long as I take periodic breaks and stretch. That’s the same for any healthy person, though.

* Exercising daily is crucial for everything, including keeping the tkr operating well. I regularly engage in swimming, stationary bicycling, walking and stretching.

* I properly nourish my body, which plays a huge role in keeping everything operating well. I eat minimal processed foods and concentrate on getting plenty of nutritious, whole foods in my system. I’ve been doing this since a kid.

* I maintain an ideal weight that is “weight-height proportionate” to reduce any impact on my joints. That’s easily done with exercise and eating properly.

That’s about it for now. How’s your post-tkr update going?

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AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physical conditons for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.

NOTE: This is a republished article from 2013.







Easy Exercises for Arthritic Knees

Hi everyone. While browsing the Internet recently, I came upon an informative and illustrative article about easy exercises for arthritic knees. It may seem counterintuitive to exercise when in pain, but it does help you out in many ways.

For the records, I do many of these exercises to this day – even years after my tkr (total knee replacement). They are helping my “good” knee while keeping my tkr knee in shape. 🙂

Click on the below link to be taken to the article found on Healthline.com:

Easy Exercises for Knee Arthritis

Thanks for stopping by. Good luck!

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AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.







How To Safely Maneuver Stairs, Steps and Ramps

Hi everyone. As you all know, having knee issues presents a unique set of concerns regarding everyday life. One main issue is conquering elevated surfaces. Let’s just say..”It ain’t for sissies.” Here are some suggestions I find helpful on how to safely maneuver stairs, steps and ramps. They all minimize knee stress.

Test the Area
First and foremost, do a safety check. Not all stairs, steps, or ramps are created equally. Check the surface material. Is it wet, dry, asphalt, cement, rubber, etc.? The material will determine your caution level and the type of footwear needed.

Before starting any attempt, make certain you are comfortable using the surfaces. The step may be thicker (steeper) than the standard version we learned to use during tkr recuperation. It may be narrower, have rounded corners, or contain uneven surfaces. All of these factors matter.

For instance, the steeper the surface level, the more physical exertion needed. Rounded corners are easier to misjudge.

FOR UPSTAIR MANEUVERING

Use Railings
I know this is common sense, but I have seen people too proud to use these helpful devices. Forget pride. Hold onto these with a firm grip whenever possible. They were developed for a reason. Always make certain they are securely attached to the wall before using to prevent injury.

Walk Sideways
Instead of taking the surface head-on, turn your body sideways. Place your “good” leg on the surface, then lift your body up until you are firmly on the surface. Don’t rush it. You will feel your quadriceps working.

“One Small Step”
Instead of alternating legs like you would when climbing stairs, place your “good” leg on the surface. Lift your body up until your knee is straight and supporting your body weight. GEntly lift your tkr (or hindered) leg and place it on the surface. Stand upright. Repeat this until you reach the top of the stairs, steps, and ramps.

To visualize this method…, you will be standing (full body) on a stair, step or ramp before moving to the next one.

Use a Cane or Crutch
This may take more time, but what’s the hurry? Remember that it is always better safe than sorry. Place the walking aide in your nonaffected-side hand. Hold firmly and apply pressure to lift your body weight up onto the stair, step, or ramp. When done correctly, your arm muscles will get a good workout.

FOR DOWNSTAIRS MANEUVERING

Walk Backwards
Turn your back to the stairs, steps, or ramp. You may feel strange, but forget what others think. Hold onto the railing, if available. Very slowly start walking backwards, one foot before the other. When done correctly, you will feel your hamstrings (back of knee) muscles working while doing this maneuver to conquer stairs, steps, and ramps.

Walk Sideways
From personal experience…Avoid this method if you wear an external shoelift. For all other interested parties, conquer the elevated surface by pretending you are a crab. Go slow and be successful.

Well, that’s all that comes to mind now about this topic. Do you have any suggestions on how you conquer stairs, steps, or ramps? We would love to hear from you!

Find interesting? Kindly share….

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.







Rated One of the Best Total Knee Replacement Blogs of 2017

Hi everyone. I am proud to announce that this blog has been rated one of the Best Total Knee Replacement Blogs of 2017 by Healthline.com. I am humbled and honored. This accomplishment would not be possible without the support of you, my readers. Thank you!

Some of you voted for my site. Others willingly leave comments to share experiences, show support, and/or join the community in other ways. However you got involved, you played a part. 🙂

For more information about this accomplishment and others who received this recognition, kindly click on this link:

Best TKR Blogs of 2017

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AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.







7 Ways To Speed Up Your Total Knee Replacement Recuperation

Hi everyone. I have been receiving inquiries from many of you for ways to speed up a total knee replacement recuperation. Here is an updated article I wrote when going through the initial tkr rehab. The information still holds true today.

Having your tkr surgery is only part of the process. How you deal with the total knee replacement recuperation that allows you to effectively utilize use your new bionic knee is another segment. It, actually, is the hardest part. Only you can determine the extent of your success.

Below are some ways I have noticed an improvement in my own total knee replacement recuperation. My knee is getting better every day because of them. They may work for you.

Drum roll, please….

1. Become mobile as quick as possible. Every hour on the hour, get up and walk around. Your level of total knee replacement recuperation (and physical therapist) will determine whether you use a walking aide.

2. Do as much as you can for yourself. Do not rely on others when you can easily (or not that easily) do it yourself. You will only be hurting yourself.

3. Know that it will be painful. You cannot get around having pain after a major surgery. That’s common sense, but I was completely unprepared for the immense pain afterwards.

4. Take a pain med prior to your exercise. I find that 30-minutes beforehand works best for me. Taking the med takes the edge off of the discomfort you will feel during movements. Of course, your pain meds will decrease as time goes on and your level of recuperation increases.  The sooner the better, I say.

5. Set a goal for your knee flexibility. Increase in small increments. Find a ‘hash mark’ on the floor that you want to stretch your foot to. Lift your leg farther than an earlier attempt.  Your physical therapist can help with this.

6. Keep icing. After every total knee replacement recuperation exercise routine, I use a variety of icing methods. The best is a simple ice pack. You can buy them prepared or make your own. Simply put some ice cubes in a sealable plastic bag. Cover your knee with a towel before applying. I have also found that frozen peas & carrots work well.

7. Elevate. Keep your leg elevated when not exercising. This helps the healing process.

Total knee replacement recuperation takes effort, determination, and perseverance. There were many times when, if looks could kill, my physical therapist wouldn’t be there.

Hope this helps others going through the same thing. Good luck and keep at it!

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AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

The site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 30+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.







Resistance Bands: Use Them For Better Joint Health

Hi my favorite readers! Resistance bands are cheap, convenient, and beneficial for getting or maintaining knee functioning. I still use them, seven years post-tkr. They are an easy way to get a workout no matter where you are. Just put one or two in a purse, backpack, luggage piece, or other item to have access whenever needed.

I was introduced to these workout marvels during my tkr recuperation process, as you likely were. If you are not familiar with these exercise tools, read further to learn why you need to add these marvels to your fitness routine. As usual, always consult with your medical care provider before starting any new exercise regime.

Side note: While going through physical therapy, I noticed different colored bands tied around the parallel bars. It turns out that these bands were known as resistance bands. They were in bright colors and I stated I wanted a red one. “This isn’t a fashion show, Marie,” is what I heard. The physical therapist then went on to tell me that different colors signify different strengths. Who knew? Not me..

rubber bands

* One exercise involves putting the band around your knee area. Wrap the band around a sturdy table leg or stationary bar. Tie the two band ends together. When done properly, the band will form a circle, with your knee in one side and the stationary item in the other.The band may start bunching together around the knee. Just flatten it out. Pull your leg out sideways. Start out slowly and gradually increase repetitions.

* Another variation involved working your glutes (or butt) and hamstrings. Instead of moving your leg out sideways, move it towards the backside of your body. Keep your knee as straight as possible. Slowly return to the original position. Rest for a few seconds. Repeat. Do the same with your opposite (“good”) leg, if desired.

* Here is a seated exercise that has always worked well for me. Try it!:
Sit on a firm chair with both legs firmly on the ground. Put both ankles inside the band circle. Separate your legs and hold for five seconds. Slowly return to the original position. Rest for a few seconds. Repeat this maneuver five times, or whatever is recommended by your medical care professional. When done correctly, you will feel the tension in your outer knee and leg area.

* For the arms: I have found them useful, also, in arm exercises. Simply place your hands inside the band circle. Pull your hands apart until a good stretch is felt. Hold for five or six seconds. Slowly return to the original position. Relax for 15 seconds. Repeat 10 times. And, the bands don’t have a chance to bunch up like they do in the knee exercises.

Here is a link to the American Council on Exercise (ACE Fitness) site that contains a wealth of information about using resistance bands for an efficient workout:

ACE Fitness Rubber Band Workout

Hope this helps others going through the same thing.

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AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns. The site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 30+ years. She is currently 61 years of age, height-weight proportionate, engaged in a healthy lifestyle, and is proud to be medication free. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.






TKR: What Does Your Knee Look Like Afterwards?

Hi everyone. I have received quite a few questions about what to expect after having a tkr or total knee replacement. What does the typical knee area look like? What did mine look like? At the two-year mark, I wrote the following post. It still applies at the 8-year post-tkr mark…fyi.

It finally happened. It’s been 25 months since my tkr and I’ve been looking at a swollen, flat knee area. Well, the other day, I took a close look at my knee. While laying down, I lifted my knee straight up to check it out. (Remember how difficult that is when first recuperating from a tkr? I sure do..) For the first time, there is a definite indentation along the inside of my tkr knee area. The area on the opposite side has a slight indentation also. The upper portion of my tkr still looks a little swollen. My surgeon said it would probably always be like that. No biggie to me.

I was curious to see how my leg looked while I standing up. The entire area surrounding my knee appears wrinkled. Big time wrinkles, like someone in the Florida sun for 30 years. There was still definition, but it appears slightly less. The swelling appears more intense when standing up. Actually, the swelling looks more like fat. Oh well. It could be worse.

Hope this helps others going through the same thing. What does your tkr knee look like?

Find interesting? Kindly share….Remember, we’re all in this together…

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns. The site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 30+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.







Eight Year Post-TKR Update

Hi everyone. Has it already been eight years since my total knee replacement, otherwise known as a tkr? You bet it has. February 2008 was when I had this surgery. So..it is time for an update.

KNEE FLEXIBILITY. My knee flexibility is still around 90-93. It is due to previous scar tissue dating back 30 years. The degree is about what it was prior to my tkr. I have written about this in numerous posts throughout my site. It is of no concern to me.

LIMITED PHYSICAL ACTIVITY. Due to the hindered flexibility, I am unable to ride a typical bicycle. Or, let me say that I can do it, but not at the speed to keep the bike and me upright. My body tilts to the right since my left tkr knee does not bend fully. Am I painting a proper picture? I hope so. I can use a stationary bike, but it certainly is not a pretty picture. 😕

TKR CLICKING. Just within the past two months have I noticed a regular clicking of my tkr. Before this, there was sporadic clicking during my initial stages of recuperation. Now, it happens daily. It is a curious event. There is no pain. Sometimes there is a sound, other times not. I guess ‘bizarre’ would be the best word to describe it.

TKR SWELLING. Only after being on my feet or sitting for an extended period of time do I notice any type of swelling. I simply elevate the leg, rest, and maybe apply ice.
By ‘extended time’, I mean about three to four hours. It does vary.

TKR PAIN. Pain occurs on such a minimal level, that I feel embarrassed to mention it. Again, when overdoing it, my tkr may be painful. I take an aspirin, elevate, and ice.

OPPOSITE HIP PAIN. I have noticed an increase in pain involving my opposite side hip recently. It may be due to my shoe lift being the incorrect size. It increases when doing stairs.

STAIRS. Speaking of stairs, if a slug and I were taking the stairs at the same time, the slug would finish first. I take my time while holding the rail. Going up is more painful than going down. Going down, however, is more difficult.

That is about it for now. If I think of anything else, I will be sure to update this eight-year post-tkr update.

Hope this helps those of you going through the same thing. If you find this post interesting, kindly share it with others. Thanks!

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns. The site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 30+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.






Boat Ramps & A TKR

Hi my favorite readers! Having recently returned from an interesting boating adventure, I thought it would be worthy to share some insightful information to help others. It involves floating boat ramps and tides. Please pardon any improper usage of nautical terms and oversimplification of this complex topic. I’m still trying to figure out this entire area. It’s totally foreign to me. I’ll give it my best…

Anyways, I learned about tides and how they affect the angle of floating ramps. Ramps are the access point onto the docks. The lower the tide, the greater the angle of the ramp. The greater the angle, the steeper the ascent or descent. More pressure is put on the knees and legs. And, I must admit, on the mental stress level.

The ramps are attached to the docks. As I previously mentioned, for this story, I’m talking about floating boat docks. These docks are affected by changing tides. Floating boat docks change heights as the tide changes. Dock components include the deck, frame, and floats. The deck is the portion you walk on. The frame supplies the structural support. The floats provide the buoyancy factor needed to keep you dry. That’s very simplified, yet helpful.

Now…let’s imagine the angle of ascent or descent due to tide changes. Picture a clock with hands on the 12 and 6. This will provide a straight vertical line, known in angle terms as 90 degrees. Halfway between this point – on the right side – will be 3. Move the lower portion of the line from 6 to 3 and you get a 45 degree. A 45-degree angle provides a perfect walking atmosphere. No stress, elevation or decline. Just ease.

Next…take that 45 degree hand and move it closer to the 90 degree line. There will be angles ranging from 46 to 89. Depending upon the tide, that is amount of descent or ascent you will experience while walking the ramp.

To put this into a real-life perspective, our trip involved a negative tide of -2. I don’t understand how that ties into ramp angles in technical terms…but I sure do know how it worked in real-life. YIKES!!!!!!!!!!! It’s a good thing there were sturdy rails. That’s all I’ve got to say. That angle would make the perfect slide scenario. Come to think of it…that would be fun!

My first exposure to floating docks was during high tide. It was a wonderful, yet interesting, ascent and descent to and from my final boat destination. Walking the ramp was no big deal. It was at about 50 degree angle. Nice. I thought it would always be like that. WRONG!!!!!!

For those tkr folk among us, I suggest walking backwards during low tide periods. It would give the hamstrings a great workout. There would be minimal stress on the knee and knee cap area. I wish I would have remembered that during my experience. So…now you know.

Hopefully this has helped others going through the same thing.

End of floating boat ramp saga..

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