Top 10 Places That Germs Lurk in Your Home

Seeing that people recuperating from a total knee replacement have a compromised immune system, I thought it was appropriate to recirculate this informative article titled ‘Top Ten Places That Germs Lurk in Your Home.’ It is also cold and flu season for everyone. This information has been on WebMD.com, Weather Channel, and other sites.

Got misophobia? You’re not alone. Fear of germs is common and can increase as busy schedules make cleaning time scarce, putting the most fastidious housekeeper on edge. To quell that fear of germs, it helps to know where the germs in your home hide — and the most important places to clean.

While researchers who track germs don’t agree 100%, here are 10 top places where germs lurk in your home- some probably surprising even to Martha Stewart. Let’s also learn how to send the bugs packing.

1. Germs Lurk in Your Home in your Kitchen Sponges
A kitchen sponge can carry more than 134,000 bacteria per square inch, according to a 2007 survey funded by Reckitt Benckiser, the maker of Lysol, and performed by the Hygiene Council. Researchers swabbed 35 U.S. homes for bacteria in 32 different sites.

What makes a sponge so buggy? Using sponges for more than one purpose is common, and people tend to keep their sponges too long, allowing bacteria to multiply, says Kelly Bright, PhD, assistant research scientist at the University of Arizona. “It’s a moist environment, and a sponge is a nice breeding ground.”

Cross-contamination of sponges is common, Bright tells WebMD. You cut raw meat, wipe it up, then prepare another dish and wipe with the same sponge. On a typical sponge you’re likely to find Salmonella (which can cause food-borne illness) and Campylobacter, which can cause diarrhea and abdominal pain, Bright says.

Remedy:
Replace your sponge once a week or so, Bright suggests. Or put it in the dishwasher regularly or soak it in bleach for about 15 minutes. “The dirtier the sponge, the longer you have to soak it to be effective.”

2. Kitchen Sink
Whether empty or full of dishes, the kitchen sink is a germ hot spot, says Bright. “People do a lot of food preparation there,” and that food can lead to contamination, with kitchen drains having more than 500,000 bacteria per square inch, according to the Hygiene Council survey.

Remedy: If you think the last bit of soap suds from washing dishes will take care of things, think again, says Philip Tierno, Jr., PhD, director of clinical microbiology and immunology at Tisch Hospital, New York University Medical Center, and associate professor of microbiology and pathology at NYU School of Medicine.

“Soap doesn’t kill bacteria,” says Tierno, the U.S. representative for the Hygiene Council. His favorite cleaning solution: bleach and water. The FDA suggests kitchen sanitizers or a homemade solution of one teaspoon chlorine bleach in a quart of water, then letting it sit on the surface you’re cleaning for 10 minutes.

3. Germs Lurk in Your Home Here: Faucet Handles
Both bathroom and kitchen faucet handles are germ-catchers. In the Hygiene Council survey, kitchen faucet handles carried more than 13,000 bacteria per square inch and bathroom faucet handles had more than 6,000 bugs per square inch.

Remedy: “Use a disinfectant cleaner spray every time you clean up,” suggests Charles Gerba, PhD, professor of soil, water and environmental science at the University of Arizona, who has researched microbes extensively. In the kitchen, that should be once a day, he says. In the bathroom, at least once a week.

4. Germs Also Lurk in Your Home Here: Home Offices
Surprise: your home office is germier than the typical work office, says Gerba. In a recent study, he compared the average number of bacteria in work and home office to find the numbers of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), which can cause serious skin infections.

In his sampling of 60 home offices and 91 work offices, five sites were tested in each. MRSA was isolated in 15 home offices but no work offices. And overall, more bacteria were found in home offices than work offices. Germiest spots in the home office were the keyboard, mouse, phone, and desktop.

“Probably people eat more in the home office,” Gerba says, partially explaining the larger bug population. “You turn your desk into a bacteria cafeteria.”

Remedy: “Use disinfectant at least once a week” on home office surfaces, suggests Gerba.

5. Toilet Bowl
Not surprisingly, the top germ winner in the Hygiene Council survey was the toilet bowl (but not the seat) with 3.2 million bacteria per square inch. Still, Gerba insists, kitchens are dirtier overall. “There are about 200 times more fecal bacteria on a cutting board,” he says, “than on a toilet seat.”

Remedy: Toilet bowl germs form a biofilm, that slimy layer that develops when bacteria attach to a support such as the bowl, says Tierno. Tackle that film with your chlorine bleach and water solution.

6. Germs Lurk in Your Home Here: Bathtub
Never mind that you think the bubble bath left you and your tub squeaky clean. Lurking near the drain of the bathtub is nearly 120,000 bacteria per square inch, according to calculations made in the Hygiene Council Survey.

Remedy: Give your bathtub a buff with bath cleaner or a chlorine-water cleaning solution mixed up at home.

7. Germs in Your Home: Shower Curtain
The crud or soap scum that collects on your shower curtain probably Sphingomonas and Methylobacterium bacteria,says Norman Pace, PhD, professor of molecular, cellular and developmental biology, University of Colorado, who collected biofilm from four vinyl shower curtains that had been in place more than six months in Boulder-area homes.

They found an abundance of Sphingomonas and Methylobacterium bacteria, and both could pose a problem for people who are immune-compromised, such as those who are HIV positive, or who have other diseases that make them prone to infections.

Remedy: Regular cleaning or replacement of the curtains is advised.

8. Germs in Your Home: Wet Laundry
What are germs doing in your washing machine? Probably contaminating other clothes. A load of just-washed clothes may look sparkling clean, but guess again.

Researchers at the University of Arizona found that intestinal viruses like hepatitis A are readily transferred from contaminated clothes to uncontaminated clothing during the washing.

Remedy: Bleach and drying time. The use of bleach reduced the number of infectious viruses on swatches after washing and drying by nearly 100%, the researchers found. Putting clothes through the drying cycle helped reduce viruses, too, according to Bright, and a hot water wash is good. “If you use the dryer, put it on hot,” she says, to kill remaining germs. And “separate adult clothes from kids’ clothes.”

9. Germs in Your Home: Vacuum Cleaner
It’s supposed to clean, but your vacuum cleaner is also a source of contamination, Gerba tells WebMD. “We looked at 30 vacuum brushes. € Fifty percent contained coliform fecal bacteria and 13% E. coli,” says Gerba. E. coli can cause diarrhea and other health problems. Coliform bacteria don’t typically cause illness, but are often found in the presence of other disease-causing organisms. “Vacuums become meals on wheels” for the bugs, Gerba says.

Remedy: “There’s not much you can do about the brush,” he says. “Vacuum the cleanest areas first and the dirtiest last,” he suggests. That way, you’ll be less likely to spread around as much bacteria. And if you use a bagless vacuum cleaner, wash your hands afterward, since bacteria can remain in the receptacle.

10. Finally, Germs Lurk in Your Home Here: Beds
Mattresses and pillows provide food for dust mites, Tierno tells WebMD, and bedding can also be a reservoir for molds and spores. “In the mattress core there are all sorts of human secretions and excretions,” he says. “Fecal matter as well as sweat and semen.” What’s the problem? “Bedroom debris is probably one of the biggest causes of allergic rhinitis,” Tierno says. “Allergy from dust mites is also a problem.”

Remedy: Place an “impervious” outer cover over the mattresses and pillows, Tierno says, to keep the debris contained. Then wash bedding regularly in water hot enough to kill the bugs.

Hope this information helps you learn more about protecting your health by knowing places where germs lurk in your home.

Find interesting? Kindly share…

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.






7 Ways to Speed Up Your Knee Replacement Recuperation

Hi my favorite readers. Many of you have approached me recently inquiring about ways to make the tkr recuperation easier. There is no simple approach, unfortunately. Sharing one of my more popular posts regarding this topic may help you. Good luck!

Having a total knee replacement surgery is only part of the process. Always remember that. How you deal with the recuperation to actually use your new knee is another part. It, actually, is the hardest part. Only you can determine the extent of your success.

  • Here are some ways I have noticed an improvement in my total knee replacement recuperation. My knee is getting better every day because of them. They may work for you. Here goes…

    * Every hour on the hour, get up and walk around. Even if it is for only a couple of minutes. You need to stand up and get your blood flowing. Your level of recuperation (and physical therapist) will determine whether you use a walking aide or not.

  • *Do as much as you can for yourself. Lower your reliance on others when you can easily do it yourself. You will only be hurting yourself.
  • *Know that it will be painful. You cannot get around having pain after a major surgery. Bummer.

    *Take a pain med prior to your exercise. I find that ½ hour beforehand works best for me. This will help make your exercise regimen go easier. Of course, your pain meds will decrease as time goes on and your level of recuperation increases. The sooner the better, I say.

    *Set a goal for your knee flexibility. Find a ‘hash mark’ on the floor that you want to stretch your foot to. Lift your leg farther than an earlier attempt. Your physical therapist can help with this.

    *Keep icing. After every exercise bout, ice your knee area. The best is a simple ice pack. Or, frozen peas and carrots work well.:)

    *Elevate. Keep your leg elevated when not exercising. This helps the healing.

    Recuperating from a total knee replacement takes work, time and effort. Stay with it and you will only benefit. Remember to check back here often to realize that you are not alone.

    Find interesting? Kindly share…

    AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

    This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.







    Be Proud Of Your Scars

    Hi everyone. How do you view scars? A few of you have asked me how do I deal with my tkr scar? The scar left behind is quite large and very noticeable. Well, your viewpoint determines whether scars are a badge of honor or an embarrassment. I say you need to be proud of your scars. Here’s more…

    NOTE: It was wonderful to see what Princess Eugenia did about showing her scoliosis scar. Apparently, she had her wedding dress designer make it a point to display her scar, not hide it. She wanted to show others that scars are nothing to be ashamed of. Good for her…:) October 2018.

    Obviously, scars can be the result of quite a few things. This article talks about the physical appearance of scars upon one’s body. These may have occurred due to surgeries, medical procedures, life’s experiences, or other such occurrences.

    According to the cosmetic industry, scars are considered yet another area of imperfection. This industry is attempting to lead us to believe that scars are something to be ashamed of. Scars are being promoted as taking away from our natural beauty, according to this powerful, multi-billion dollar industry.

    Turn on the television, visit social media sites, or pick up a magazine and you will find ads about scar-eliminating products. The ad will likely show a person explaining the dramatic/negative effects a 1/4-1/2″ scar has upon them. The totally debilitating scar is the main concern of one’s existence, according to this ad. The ads can be very convincing. I say “spare me”.

    Or, go to the store and peruse the shelves filled with products claiming cosmetic improvements to one’s appearance. It’s mind-boggling. It’s bad enough that the cosmetic field has us convinced that our natural state is improper, but to try to convince us that scars are a sign of deficiency? Come on.

    My viewpoint? Scars are a sign that one has encountered a battle and lived to talk about it. My total knee replacement scar is about 10″ long. Yours is probably about the same.

    My philosophy? Add it to the collection. The outside of my thigh has another 10″ scar that is 40 years old. And, there are others. They all have a story behind them. 🙂

    Scars are not something to be ashamed of, or hidden from view. Weather permitting, I wear shorts and my scars show. If someone doesn’t like seeing them, they don’t have to look.

    Moral of story:
    Be proud of your scars and treat them like a trophy. Show them off when you can. Talk about them in a comfortable manner with others. Share the experience behind them. Not everyone can regale your tales like you can. 🙂

    When you notice someone staring at your scar (and it will happen), wait for them to say something. Over the years, my experience shows most will not. Those who do, do so out of true concern. Just answer questions honestly. You have nothing to be embarrassed about.

    Be free to say to whoever will listen… “Want to see my scar?” Do it with enthusiasm and proudness. Then, show it off while gazing fondly at it. (You may get some strange looks when you do this, though. 🙂 )

    Some scars are the result of carelessness or errors on one’s part. An example of this is using power tools incorrectly, or improper use of fireworks. Now, I would think those scars would need a little more story embellishment.

    Scars are a sign of survival. Don’t let anyone tell you otherwise. The only alternative to survival is death. You choose.

    End of my “soap opera speech” for the day. Hope this helps others going through the same thing. 🙂

    Find interesting? Kindly share…Thanks!

    AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

    This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.


    Scoliosis and a Total Knee Replacement

    Hi everyone. Due to numerous requests, I am reprinting this article about living with scoliosis and a total knee replacement. My total knee replacement is due to fracturing my femur 40+ years ago in an auto accident. During recuperation, the femur was misaligned and shortened, resulting in a leg length discrepancy and scoliosis. Hopefully, this insight can help you..

    After having fractured my femur (the largest bone in the body), my gait was altered. In turn, this caused my spinal column to become malformed -“S”shaped. I developed scoliosis, curvature of the spine. Mine is happening from my waist down, the lower spine.

    The scoliosis curved by spine so I now need a 2” shoe lift. Luckily, my spine condition has not caused me any severe problems – as I have heard other people experiencing.

    A great exercise for dealing with scoliosis, for me, is to stretch from my waist to toe. (Like touching my toes, only I touch the ground with my wrists).

    Also, another great exercise involves getting in the push up position and then arching my back like a cat and then reversing ..or “curving” it while looking up.

    According to yoga practitioners, this yoga maneuver is titled the cat pose. Like many of you, probably, I was doing this stretch way before yoga became “the current craze”. It’s always interesting to see how exercises take on new forms and practices. 🙂

    I also like to lay on a flat surface and bring my knees to my chest. This stretches my lower back.

    As long as I have had scoliosis, it is not something that has ever caused me extreme discomfort. I have been blessed in that matter. Perhaps it’s because I eat healthy, wear my shoe lift, exercise regularly, am medication-free, and take care of my health. Whatever the reason, I am truly grateful.

    Hope this helps others going through the same thing. Of course, these exercises may not work for you. Always be safe and consult with your medical care provider before starting any new exercise.

    AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

    This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through similar situations.

    Find interesting? Kindly share…Thanks!






    How To Lower Your Risks of Falling

    Tips on How to lower your risks of falling

    Hi my favorite readers! While recuperating, and preparing, for a total knee replacement it is important to prepare your living area to help avoid falls. Here are some helpful tips on how to lower your risks of falling. They apply for everyone, not just a total knee replacement person.

    This is also an excerpt from my ebook titled…”Preparing for a Total Knee Replacement”.

    * Remove all loose rugs that do not have a nonstick backing. If possible, duct tape the rugs to the floor – if desired.

    * Remove all loose rugs, period. Sometimes, depending on your balance, crutches and walkers will have a hard time getting around the edges of loose rugs.

    * Remove all cords from the floor. If you don’t remove them, make certain that you can maneuver around them without causing any distress.

    I have known people who didn’t look down while walking and tripped over cords that easily could have been avoided had they watching where they were walking. 

    * Be careful and aware of your surroundings. It is crucial for fall prevention.

    * Watch out for small animals. They have a tendency to run under your feet quickly and without warning.

    * I recommend not having any small animals (considered hazards) around for the first week after surgery. Do your part in fall prevention and total knee replacement instances.

    * Don’t reach for anything above your head.  It is too easy to lose your balance this way.

    * Don’t drink alcohol. If you simply must have it, consume minimal amounts. This is common sense, but it does affect one’s balance.

    * Don’t lean to either side while on your crutches or walker. Keep your body weight evenly positioned. Remember to keep a square, safe reach area around you. Again, you will lose your balance too easily if you don’t.

    It is easy to avoid falling while recuperating from a total knee replacement if you prepare both yourself and home beforehand. Be successful by using these how to tips. All are tried and true.

    Hope this helps others going through the same thing.

    Find interesting? Kindly share…Thanks!

    AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

    This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.






    Announcing Updated Preparing For Total Knee Replacement EBook

    Hi everyone. I am pleased to announce the third printing of my popular ebook titled ‘Preparing For A Total Knee Replacement’. Content is recently updated.

    A total knee replacement can be one of the most trying and tiring of surgeries to undergo. Preparing properly can save you time, frustration and money.

    After going through the entire ordeal myself, I decided to write this ebook to help others. It is intended to share rare situations. Nowhere did I read or hear about what to do if the doctor cancels on surgery day due to sickness, cancels another date, and reschedules the surgery another month later. This happened to me.

    I needed to go through the pre-op medical process twice within a two-month period – for the same surgery. In fact, two pints of my own blood were discarded like trash. That’s a harrowing experience.

    Let my insight make your life easier. I provide you with a first-hand account about how to get all areas of your life prepared for your tkr surgery.

    I know that getting ready for a total knee replacement is more than just scheduling a surgery date. It is more than sitting in support groups and talking. It involves taking action.

    The available information given by the doctor’s office was/is written by the medical profession. I found the information helpful, but lacking some key points. A patient’s perspective was needed.

    I now know how things could have been easier if I was better informed/prepared. After hearing from my blog readers, I knew there were others out there who could benefit from my first-hand experience. That’s when I decided to write my ebook.

    This ebook is especially helpful for those not having access to support groups or insight from people who had the surgery. Instead of relying on conflicting Internet information, you can be relieved in knowing that my information is tried and true.

    Purchase
    You can purchase the book directly through me by visiting my Books Page. Or, click here:
    Preparing For Total Knee Replacement Surgery Ebook I accept Paypal and will send the book in PDF format as soon as possible.

    Thanks for your time and hope to hear from you soon!

    AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

    This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.






    How To Find Motivation to Exercise After A TKR

    Hi everyone. Usually, it is easy to back out of exercising. Many people continually make excuses about why they don’t exercise. However, I want to share some great ways on how to find motivation to exercise after a tkr. Read on…

    Be diligent in doing your exercises while recuperating from your total knee replacement and you will get excited about what used to be difficult when moving your body. Why? You will reap your rewards. Here’s my take on the issue….

    * You will love how thrilling it is to be able to walk without pain.

    * It is great to have what is known as a ‘normal’ walking gait without walking aides.

    * It is fantastic to be able to walk fast enough to get out of breath and work up a sweat. (To some this would be “speed walking”. I like to think of it as walking faster than I did prior to my tkr.)

    * It is wonderful to be able to walk trails, take in the scenery, and smell the air without feeling any joint pain.

    * It is a nice feeling knowing that you are getting the most out of your total knee replacement surgery.

    * It is so welcoming to have clothes fit better. I know, in my case, there were times when my dryer shrunk too many clothes. 😕

    All of these combine to provide motivation in staying with, or starting, an exercise program.

    Hope this helps you get motivated to exercise after your tkr (or any time, for that matter).

    Always remember to be grateful you can walk.

    Find interesting? Kindly share…
    AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

    This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.







    Stairs as a Knee Replacement Exercise

    Hi everyone. When working on gaining flexibility in your knee, a great exercise is to walk up and down stairs. Going up is much easier than going down.

    Part of the recuperation process after a total knee replacement involves a variety of exercises involving stairs or steps.

    The first movement in my case was to simply stand up and lift my leg onto a step. I say simply, but it was definitely not easy. It took all the energy I had. (TKR surgery involves cutting through the quadricep muscle, the largest muscle in your leg.)

    Then, lift our body weight onto your tkr leg.

    Place your “good” leg onto the step/stair.

    Hold this position for five seconds.

    Return to the original position.

    Rest for 10 seconds.

    Repeat five times. Slowly increase your time and repetitions.

    Do this maneuver with the aid of crutches, at first. Then, eventually, all that will needed is the aid of railings or parallel bars.

    It is not easy, but once it starts working out….it’s great. Hard work pays off.

    NOTE: You may want to start this exercise by placing your tkr leg onto a step, lifting your body up until your knee is straight, and then lowering yourself back to the original position.

    AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

    This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.







    Driving In Real-Life Versus Video Games

    Hi my favorite readers. Something has come to my attention that, I believe, needs discussed. It involves driving in real-life versus video games.

    It seems that many young drivers have difficulty deciphering between driving cars while playing a video game or driving a car in real life. So, to make it as easy as possible….Here are some helpful suggestions:

    TURN YOUR NECK WHEN MANEUVERING YOUR VEHICLE. You do NOT keep looking straight ahead while pulling into the adjoining lane. You do NOT pull out in traffic without turning your head to EACH SIDE before moving. There will be traffic on both sides of your vehicle and the only way you can see it is BY TURNING YOUR NECK and USING YOUR EYES.

    Check your surroundings. Look to be certain no kids or people, small dogs, toys, or other potential hazards are around. You cannot simply turn on a device and start driving at full speed. Safety first. That is not taught in video games.

    MORAL OF STORY: Driving in “real life” is NOT like playing a video game, where you can stare straight ahead and not move your neck, head or eyes more than a slight, if any, degree.

    Real-life versus video games driving involves more than simply turning your remote device slightly to the left or right while driving your on-screen vehicle in that high-speed chase or race. Real life driving utilizes your mental and physical capacities…that is if you..no, I won’t go there.

    Get a grip on life and how things really operate. It is more than moving your joystick and/or thumbs on a device. It INVOLVES YOUR LIFE AND OTHER DRIVERS. You are not the center of the universe. The road is to be shared by all.

    Find interesting? Kindly share…







    Five Year Post-TKR Update

    Hi everyone. Many of you have asked about my five year post-tkr update. Here is a reprint of my original article, originally published March 7, 2013.

    Wow..five years have already passed since my total knee replacement surgery. As the saying goes..”where has the time gone?” Anyways, it’s time for a tkr update. Thanks for reminding me of this. I am a success story for a tkr, and grateful for it.

    * Nothing much has changed since my last update, actually. I am in good health except for my bionic knee.

    * My knee still swells up when I overdo it. Sometimes it hurts, other times it does not.

    * I can kneel, but not with as much flexibility as my “healthy” knee. That’s no big deal since I couldn’t really do that prior to my tkr surgery.

    * I can walk without pain. That’s a crucial improvement, when compared to before surgery.

    * I still am not on any medications. Considering my age, and the feedback from heavily prescribed friends, I am very proud of that fact.

    * Sleeping is no problem at all. How grateful am I for that?! 🙂

    * Flexibility is around 93. That’s what it was prior to my tkr. Once again…no biggie. I would absolutely not have a manipulation done. Never even considered it. If someone else wants to do it, that’s their business.

    * Sitting is fine as long as I take periodic breaks and stretch. That’s the same for any healthy person, though.

    * Exercising daily is crucial for everything, including keeping the tkr operating well. I regularly engage in swimming, stationary bicycling, walking and stretching.

    * I properly nourish my body, which plays a huge role in keeping everything operating well. I eat minimal processed foods and concentrate on getting plenty of nutritious, whole foods in my system. I’ve been doing this since a kid.

    * I maintain an ideal weight that is “weight-height proportionate” to reduce any impact on my joints. That’s easily done with exercise and eating properly.

    That’s about it for now. How’s your post-tkr update going?

    Find interesting? Kindly share…

    AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

    This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physical conditons for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.

    NOTE: This is a republished article from 2013.