How To Find Motivation to Exercise After A TKR

Hi everyone. Usually, it is easy to back out of exercising. Many people continually make excuses about why they don’t exercise. However, I want to share some great ways on how to find motivation to exercise after a tkr. Read on…

Be diligent in doing your exercises while recuperating from your total knee replacement and you will get excited about what used to be difficult when moving your body. Why? You will reap your rewards. Here’s my take on the issue….

* You will love how thrilling it is to be able to walk without pain.

* It is great to have what is known as a ‘normal’ walking gait without walking aides.

* It is fantastic to be able to walk fast enough to get out of breath and work up a sweat. (To some this would be “speed walking”. I like to think of it as walking faster than I did prior to my tkr.)

* It is wonderful to be able to walk trails, take in the scenery, and smell the air without feeling any joint pain.

* It is a nice feeling knowing that you are getting the most out of your total knee replacement surgery.

* It is so welcoming to have clothes fit better. I know, in my case, there were times when my dryer shrunk too many clothes. 😕

All of these combine to provide motivation in staying with, or starting, an exercise program.

Hope this helps you get motivated to exercise after your tkr (or any time, for that matter).

Always remember to be grateful you can walk.

Find interesting? Kindly share…
AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.







How To Safely Maneuver Stairs, Steps and Ramps

Hi everyone. As you all know, having knee issues presents a unique set of concerns regarding everyday life. One main issue is conquering elevated surfaces. Let’s just say..”It ain’t for sissies.” Here are some suggestions I find helpful on how to safely maneuver stairs, steps and ramps. They all minimize knee stress.

Test the Area
First and foremost, do a safety check. Not all stairs, steps, or ramps are created equally. Check the surface material. Is it wet, dry, asphalt, cement, rubber, etc.? The material will determine your caution level and the type of footwear needed.

Before starting any attempt, make certain you are comfortable using the surfaces. The step may be thicker (steeper) than the standard version we learned to use during tkr recuperation. It may be narrower, have rounded corners, or contain uneven surfaces. All of these factors matter.

For instance, the steeper the surface level, the more physical exertion needed. Rounded corners are easier to misjudge.

FOR UPSTAIR MANEUVERING

Use Railings
I know this is common sense, but I have seen people too proud to use these helpful devices. Forget pride. Hold onto these with a firm grip whenever possible. They were developed for a reason. Always make certain they are securely attached to the wall before using to prevent injury.

Walk Sideways
Instead of taking the surface head-on, turn your body sideways. Place your “good” leg on the surface, then lift your body up until you are firmly on the surface. Don’t rush it. You will feel your quadriceps working.

“One Small Step”
Instead of alternating legs like you would when climbing stairs, place your “good” leg on the surface. Lift your body up until your knee is straight and supporting your body weight. GEntly lift your tkr (or hindered) leg and place it on the surface. Stand upright. Repeat this until you reach the top of the stairs, steps, and ramps.

To visualize this method…, you will be standing (full body) on a stair, step or ramp before moving to the next one.

Use a Cane or Crutch
This may take more time, but what’s the hurry? Remember that it is always better safe than sorry. Place the walking aide in your nonaffected-side hand. Hold firmly and apply pressure to lift your body weight up onto the stair, step, or ramp. When done correctly, your arm muscles will get a good workout.

FOR DOWNSTAIRS MANEUVERING

Walk Backwards
Turn your back to the stairs, steps, or ramp. You may feel strange, but forget what others think. Hold onto the railing, if available. Very slowly start walking backwards, one foot before the other. When done correctly, you will feel your hamstrings (back of knee) muscles working while doing this maneuver to conquer stairs, steps, and ramps.

Walk Sideways
From personal experience…Avoid this method if you wear an external shoelift. For all other interested parties, conquer the elevated surface by pretending you are a crab. Go slow and be successful.

Well, that’s all that comes to mind now about this topic. Do you have any suggestions on how you conquer stairs, steps, or ramps? We would love to hear from you!

Find interesting? Kindly share….

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.







Shoe Lifts: Little Known Benefits

Hi my favorite readers! Wearing shoe lifts, whether they are noticeable or not, provides many benefits. It can be easy to focus on the negative, but what’s the point in that?

I previously wrote about being grateful for my 1.5 inch shoe lift. And..seeing that the post received such positive feedback, I thought I’d talk about it again. Enjoy!

Some may think that wearing shoe lifts is a hindrance. After all, not everyone wears one and the wearer could be on the receiving end of some strange looks. I know since I have been wearing a noticeable external lift for 42 years. I am still sensitive to the strange looks I sometimes get.

Part of my recuperation from my tkr includes having to adjust my shoe lift thicknesss. That is a process I hope none of you have to go through. Anyways, that is why I have figured out reasons to be grateful for wearing these beneficial orthotics.

Puddle Conquering. Depending upon the thickness of a shoe lift, puddles can easily be walked through. Your shoe will not get wet, unlike your regular shoe. This statement applies to shallow streams, also. Your feet will stay dry.

Self Defense Tool. If someone starts to give the wearer a hard time, shoe lifts can be used to place a heavy kick to the groin. The extra weight will make for an extra punch.

This maneuver only applies if you can lift your leg high enough to get a good kick in, though. Your leg muscles may not be strong enough. If you have difficulties lifting your leg, give a good kick to the shins. Ouch!

Convenient Bug Squasher. The extra weight of shoe lifts can provide for an easy elimination of bugs that are otherwise hard to kill (such as immensely oversized cockroaches known as Palmetto bugs. Eww..!!).

All you need to do is get a quick whack! or stomp in and the little critter will be saved a lingering death. Plug your ears in case the critter has a hard shell. You do not want to hear the crunch..believe me. Be sure to apologize to them before the killing process, though. They usually do not mean any harm.

It Improves Mobility. Of course, the best reason for wearing a shoe lift is the fact that it improves your mobility. It balances out your musculoskeletal system and gait. As a walking aide, it makes getting around easier and less painful.

There’s nothing funny about this. Just a plain and simple, hard, cold fact. It has helped out tremendously since my total knee replacement.

Hoping this helps others going through the same thing. Do you have similar stories to share? Feel free to post your comments….

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physical conditions for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.

Find interesting? Kindly share…







Getting In and Out of a Car After A TKR

This can be tricky for awhile after having a total knee replacement. When first discharged from the hospital, I noticed how low my friend’s car was to the ground. It was extremely difficult to maneuver in and out of the car. I hadn’t thought about that prior to my tkr.

Here are some other suggestions….

Height. If the chassis, or your seat, is too low to the ground…put a pillow onto the seat. This will lift your body and provide more comfort. I would recommend using a fluffy, narrow pillow that covers the entire width of your rump. Otherwise, it might be too painful. That’s just me, though.

Seat. Move the seat all the way back. This is common sense, but it will give you more leg room. Remember, your tkr leg is not going to have much, if any, flexion when first out of surgery.
Even as I progressed during recuperation, I needed to slide my seat back to get in and out of my car. Then, once in the car, I could slide it forward again.

Plastic bag. Some people I know used a plastic bag to cover the seat. This provided them with more sliding ability. I never had to use this, but if it works for you….go for it.

Speed. Go slow. While getting in and out of my car during my tkr recuperation, a slug would have won a race with me. However, I never banged my leg against the car door, either. 🙂 Better safe than sorry, is my motto.

Hope these suggestions work for others going through the same thing.

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