Top 10 Places That Germs Lurk in Your Home

Seeing that people recuperating from a total knee replacement have a compromised immune system, I thought it was appropriate to recirculate this informative article titled ‘Top Ten Places That Germs Lurk in Your Home.’ It is also cold and flu season for everyone. This information has been on WebMD.com, Weather Channel, and other sites.

Got misophobia? You’re not alone. Fear of germs is common and can increase as busy schedules make cleaning time scarce, putting the most fastidious housekeeper on edge. To quell that fear of germs, it helps to know where the germs in your home hide — and the most important places to clean.

While researchers who track germs don’t agree 100%, here are 10 top places where germs lurk in your home- some probably surprising even to Martha Stewart. Let’s also learn how to send the bugs packing.

1. Germs Lurk in Your Home in your Kitchen Sponges
A kitchen sponge can carry more than 134,000 bacteria per square inch, according to a 2007 survey funded by Reckitt Benckiser, the maker of Lysol, and performed by the Hygiene Council. Researchers swabbed 35 U.S. homes for bacteria in 32 different sites.

What makes a sponge so buggy? Using sponges for more than one purpose is common, and people tend to keep their sponges too long, allowing bacteria to multiply, says Kelly Bright, PhD, assistant research scientist at the University of Arizona. “It’s a moist environment, and a sponge is a nice breeding ground.”

Cross-contamination of sponges is common, Bright tells WebMD. You cut raw meat, wipe it up, then prepare another dish and wipe with the same sponge. On a typical sponge you’re likely to find Salmonella (which can cause food-borne illness) and Campylobacter, which can cause diarrhea and abdominal pain, Bright says.

Remedy:
Replace your sponge once a week or so, Bright suggests. Or put it in the dishwasher regularly or soak it in bleach for about 15 minutes. “The dirtier the sponge, the longer you have to soak it to be effective.”

2. Kitchen Sink
Whether empty or full of dishes, the kitchen sink is a germ hot spot, says Bright. “People do a lot of food preparation there,” and that food can lead to contamination, with kitchen drains having more than 500,000 bacteria per square inch, according to the Hygiene Council survey.

Remedy: If you think the last bit of soap suds from washing dishes will take care of things, think again, says Philip Tierno, Jr., PhD, director of clinical microbiology and immunology at Tisch Hospital, New York University Medical Center, and associate professor of microbiology and pathology at NYU School of Medicine.

“Soap doesn’t kill bacteria,” says Tierno, the U.S. representative for the Hygiene Council. His favorite cleaning solution: bleach and water. The FDA suggests kitchen sanitizers or a homemade solution of one teaspoon chlorine bleach in a quart of water, then letting it sit on the surface you’re cleaning for 10 minutes.

3. Germs Lurk in Your Home Here: Faucet Handles
Both bathroom and kitchen faucet handles are germ-catchers. In the Hygiene Council survey, kitchen faucet handles carried more than 13,000 bacteria per square inch and bathroom faucet handles had more than 6,000 bugs per square inch.

Remedy: “Use a disinfectant cleaner spray every time you clean up,” suggests Charles Gerba, PhD, professor of soil, water and environmental science at the University of Arizona, who has researched microbes extensively. In the kitchen, that should be once a day, he says. In the bathroom, at least once a week.

4. Germs Also Lurk in Your Home Here: Home Offices
Surprise: your home office is germier than the typical work office, says Gerba. In a recent study, he compared the average number of bacteria in work and home office to find the numbers of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), which can cause serious skin infections.

In his sampling of 60 home offices and 91 work offices, five sites were tested in each. MRSA was isolated in 15 home offices but no work offices. And overall, more bacteria were found in home offices than work offices. Germiest spots in the home office were the keyboard, mouse, phone, and desktop.

“Probably people eat more in the home office,” Gerba says, partially explaining the larger bug population. “You turn your desk into a bacteria cafeteria.”

Remedy: “Use disinfectant at least once a week” on home office surfaces, suggests Gerba.

5. Toilet Bowl
Not surprisingly, the top germ winner in the Hygiene Council survey was the toilet bowl (but not the seat) with 3.2 million bacteria per square inch. Still, Gerba insists, kitchens are dirtier overall. “There are about 200 times more fecal bacteria on a cutting board,” he says, “than on a toilet seat.”

Remedy: Toilet bowl germs form a biofilm, that slimy layer that develops when bacteria attach to a support such as the bowl, says Tierno. Tackle that film with your chlorine bleach and water solution.

6. Germs Lurk in Your Home Here: Bathtub
Never mind that you think the bubble bath left you and your tub squeaky clean. Lurking near the drain of the bathtub is nearly 120,000 bacteria per square inch, according to calculations made in the Hygiene Council Survey.

Remedy: Give your bathtub a buff with bath cleaner or a chlorine-water cleaning solution mixed up at home.

7. Germs in Your Home: Shower Curtain
The crud or soap scum that collects on your shower curtain probably Sphingomonas and Methylobacterium bacteria,says Norman Pace, PhD, professor of molecular, cellular and developmental biology, University of Colorado, who collected biofilm from four vinyl shower curtains that had been in place more than six months in Boulder-area homes.

They found an abundance of Sphingomonas and Methylobacterium bacteria, and both could pose a problem for people who are immune-compromised, such as those who are HIV positive, or who have other diseases that make them prone to infections.

Remedy: Regular cleaning or replacement of the curtains is advised.

8. Germs in Your Home: Wet Laundry
What are germs doing in your washing machine? Probably contaminating other clothes. A load of just-washed clothes may look sparkling clean, but guess again.

Researchers at the University of Arizona found that intestinal viruses like hepatitis A are readily transferred from contaminated clothes to uncontaminated clothing during the washing.

Remedy: Bleach and drying time. The use of bleach reduced the number of infectious viruses on swatches after washing and drying by nearly 100%, the researchers found. Putting clothes through the drying cycle helped reduce viruses, too, according to Bright, and a hot water wash is good. “If you use the dryer, put it on hot,” she says, to kill remaining germs. And “separate adult clothes from kids’ clothes.”

9. Germs in Your Home: Vacuum Cleaner
It’s supposed to clean, but your vacuum cleaner is also a source of contamination, Gerba tells WebMD. “We looked at 30 vacuum brushes. € Fifty percent contained coliform fecal bacteria and 13% E. coli,” says Gerba. E. coli can cause diarrhea and other health problems. Coliform bacteria don’t typically cause illness, but are often found in the presence of other disease-causing organisms. “Vacuums become meals on wheels” for the bugs, Gerba says.

Remedy: “There’s not much you can do about the brush,” he says. “Vacuum the cleanest areas first and the dirtiest last,” he suggests. That way, you’ll be less likely to spread around as much bacteria. And if you use a bagless vacuum cleaner, wash your hands afterward, since bacteria can remain in the receptacle.

10. Finally, Germs Lurk in Your Home Here: Beds
Mattresses and pillows provide food for dust mites, Tierno tells WebMD, and bedding can also be a reservoir for molds and spores. “In the mattress core there are all sorts of human secretions and excretions,” he says. “Fecal matter as well as sweat and semen.” What’s the problem? “Bedroom debris is probably one of the biggest causes of allergic rhinitis,” Tierno says. “Allergy from dust mites is also a problem.”

Remedy: Place an “impervious” outer cover over the mattresses and pillows, Tierno says, to keep the debris contained. Then wash bedding regularly in water hot enough to kill the bugs.

Hope this information helps you learn more about protecting your health by knowing places where germs lurk in your home.

Find interesting? Kindly share…

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.






7 Ways to Speed Up Your Knee Replacement Recuperation

Hi my favorite readers. Many of you have approached me recently inquiring about ways to make the tkr recuperation easier. There is no simple approach, unfortunately. Sharing one of my more popular posts regarding this topic may help you. Good luck!

Having a total knee replacement surgery is only part of the process. Always remember that. How you deal with the recuperation to actually use your new knee is another part. It, actually, is the hardest part. Only you can determine the extent of your success.

  • Here are some ways I have noticed an improvement in my total knee replacement recuperation. My knee is getting better every day because of them. They may work for you. Here goes…

    * Every hour on the hour, get up and walk around. Even if it is for only a couple of minutes. You need to stand up and get your blood flowing. Your level of recuperation (and physical therapist) will determine whether you use a walking aide or not.

  • *Do as much as you can for yourself. Lower your reliance on others when you can easily do it yourself. You will only be hurting yourself.
  • *Know that it will be painful. You cannot get around having pain after a major surgery. Bummer.

    *Take a pain med prior to your exercise. I find that ½ hour beforehand works best for me. This will help make your exercise regimen go easier. Of course, your pain meds will decrease as time goes on and your level of recuperation increases. The sooner the better, I say.

    *Set a goal for your knee flexibility. Find a ‘hash mark’ on the floor that you want to stretch your foot to. Lift your leg farther than an earlier attempt. Your physical therapist can help with this.

    *Keep icing. After every exercise bout, ice your knee area. The best is a simple ice pack. Or, frozen peas and carrots work well.:)

    *Elevate. Keep your leg elevated when not exercising. This helps the healing.

    Recuperating from a total knee replacement takes work, time and effort. Stay with it and you will only benefit. Remember to check back here often to realize that you are not alone.

    Find interesting? Kindly share…

    AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

    This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.







    How To Lower Your Risks of Falling

    Tips on How to lower your risks of falling

    Hi my favorite readers! While recuperating, and preparing, for a total knee replacement it is important to prepare your living area to help avoid falls. Here are some helpful tips on how to lower your risks of falling. They apply for everyone, not just a total knee replacement person.

    This is also an excerpt from my ebook titled…”Preparing for a Total Knee Replacement”.

    * Remove all loose rugs that do not have a nonstick backing. If possible, duct tape the rugs to the floor – if desired.

    * Remove all loose rugs, period. Sometimes, depending on your balance, crutches and walkers will have a hard time getting around the edges of loose rugs.

    * Remove all cords from the floor. If you don’t remove them, make certain that you can maneuver around them without causing any distress.

    I have known people who didn’t look down while walking and tripped over cords that easily could have been avoided had they watching where they were walking. 

    * Be careful and aware of your surroundings. It is crucial for fall prevention.

    * Watch out for small animals. They have a tendency to run under your feet quickly and without warning.

    * I recommend not having any small animals (considered hazards) around for the first week after surgery. Do your part in fall prevention and total knee replacement instances.

    * Don’t reach for anything above your head.  It is too easy to lose your balance this way.

    * Don’t drink alcohol. If you simply must have it, consume minimal amounts. This is common sense, but it does affect one’s balance.

    * Don’t lean to either side while on your crutches or walker. Keep your body weight evenly positioned. Remember to keep a square, safe reach area around you. Again, you will lose your balance too easily if you don’t.

    It is easy to avoid falling while recuperating from a total knee replacement if you prepare both yourself and home beforehand. Be successful by using these how to tips. All are tried and true.

    Hope this helps others going through the same thing.

    Find interesting? Kindly share…Thanks!

    AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

    This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.






    How To Find Motivation to Exercise After A TKR

    Hi everyone. Usually, it is easy to back out of exercising. Many people continually make excuses about why they don’t exercise. However, I want to share some great ways on how to find motivation to exercise after a tkr. Read on…

    Be diligent in doing your exercises while recuperating from your total knee replacement and you will get excited about what used to be difficult when moving your body. Why? You will reap your rewards. Here’s my take on the issue….

    * You will love how thrilling it is to be able to walk without pain.

    * It is great to have what is known as a ‘normal’ walking gait without walking aides.

    * It is fantastic to be able to walk fast enough to get out of breath and work up a sweat. (To some this would be “speed walking”. I like to think of it as walking faster than I did prior to my tkr.)

    * It is wonderful to be able to walk trails, take in the scenery, and smell the air without feeling any joint pain.

    * It is a nice feeling knowing that you are getting the most out of your total knee replacement surgery.

    * It is so welcoming to have clothes fit better. I know, in my case, there were times when my dryer shrunk too many clothes. 😕

    All of these combine to provide motivation in staying with, or starting, an exercise program.

    Hope this helps you get motivated to exercise after your tkr (or any time, for that matter).

    Always remember to be grateful you can walk.

    Find interesting? Kindly share…
    AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

    This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.







    Stairs as a Knee Replacement Exercise

    Hi everyone. When working on gaining flexibility in your knee, a great exercise is to walk up and down stairs. Going up is much easier than going down.

    Part of the recuperation process after a total knee replacement involves a variety of exercises involving stairs or steps.

    The first movement in my case was to simply stand up and lift my leg onto a step. I say simply, but it was definitely not easy. It took all the energy I had. (TKR surgery involves cutting through the quadricep muscle, the largest muscle in your leg.)

    Then, lift our body weight onto your tkr leg.

    Place your “good” leg onto the step/stair.

    Hold this position for five seconds.

    Return to the original position.

    Rest for 10 seconds.

    Repeat five times. Slowly increase your time and repetitions.

    Do this maneuver with the aid of crutches, at first. Then, eventually, all that will needed is the aid of railings or parallel bars.

    It is not easy, but once it starts working out….it’s great. Hard work pays off.

    NOTE: You may want to start this exercise by placing your tkr leg onto a step, lifting your body up until your knee is straight, and then lowering yourself back to the original position.

    AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

    This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.







    What Exactly Does “Pain Med” Mean?

    Personal insight into what “pain med” actually means.

    Hi everyone. After almost three months of recuperating from a total knee replacement surgery, I have finally figured out what is meant by “pain med”. At first, I thought it meant that the medications were supposed to alleviate pain completely. That just was not so. What exactly does “pain med” mean?

    In fact, no matter what type I was given, there was still pain. Sometimes the pain was unbearable. It always existed in some form. So, I resigned myself to the fact that a pain med just doesn’t work.

    Then, I ran out. I didn’t think it as any big deal. Usually, I took one pain med one-half hour before my pt or exercise.   Well, this time I just went for a walk thinking “What’s the use of a pain med, anyways? The term is joke.” Wow….what a difference! The pain was intense after finishing my exercise routine. I could hardly move my leg.

    So, the verdict is….pain meds help take the edge off of pain. They decrease the pain intensity. They do not totally eliminate pain, as some (like me) would think.

    Find interesting? Kindly share…

    AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

    This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.







    One Week After A Total Knee Replacement

    Hi everyone! Have you recently undergone a total knee replacement? Are you wondering what others in your similar situation are going through? I know some of you are, since you have contacted me. You have been asking for an article I wrote discussing what happens one week after a total knee replacement.

    Here goes…

    It’s been a week since my total knee replacement. Considering that it’s a major operation, it just amazes me how my tkr recovery has me I’m up and around. There’s a lot of swelling of my foot and knee area. It goes down a bit with ice.

    Every hour, I get up and walk around. In addition to developing my knee muscles from the surgery, I need to retrain my muscles to be used ‘normally’. See, for the past 30 years, I’ve been wearing a shoe lift. This means that I haven’t been walking from heel to toe. Rather, my gait has been from plop to toe.

    The pain upon first rising, either in the morning or after sitting, is unbearable. Once I begin to move, though, it gets better. Prescribed pain meds are ineffective for me. They usually get me nauseated. So, I don’t take any.

    Muscles are meant to be used, and it’s interesting to see how they develop and/or rebuild one week after a total knee replacement. Painful, but interesting. Don’t ask me to repeat that next time I stand up, though.

    Once finding out I needed a home therapist 3x/week, I didn’t think it was necessary. Now, I’m glad it’s happening. On our first meeting, she showed me new ‘tricks’. I’ve already told her that she is known to my friends as “the torturist”. Her reply to that? “PT stands for pain and torture”. That’s funny.

    My PT lady just came and went. She eliminated an unbearable amount of pain simply by stretching my newly aligned muscles. Right on, PT lady. 🙂

    Hope my tkr blog insight about what happens one week after a total knee replacement helps others going through the same thing. Do not give up. It does get better!

    Find interesting? Kindly share my tkr blogger story…Thanks!

    AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

    This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.

     

    A Therapy Car For TKR Recuperation? YES!

    Hi everyone. We all know the difficulties of getting in and out of a car after having a total knee replacement (aka tkr) surgery. There is some exciting news happening in the medical rehabilitation development field…it’s called a Therapy Car.

    I just finished reading a very interesting article in the current issue of Virginia Mason’s newsletter. The Therapy Car was developed by the team members at this prestigious and world-known hospital. The device is in the licensing process for manufacture and distribution worldwide.

    The model Therapy Car frame is composed of light-weight connectors and tubing that can be adjusted to simulate different automotive makes and models. There is something for everyone going through the total knee replacement recuperation process. How cool is that?

    Before you go out and try to buy one, though – the therapy car is only used under the supervision of an occupational or physical therapist. It’ll be part of the therapy tools we can use during our tkr recuperation.

    Find interesting? (And why wouldn’t you?)…Kindly share with others.

    AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physical concerns.

    This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physical concerns for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.







    Finding Inspiration During Recuperation

    Hi everyone. As anyone knows, any type of recuperation process is difficult, time consuming, and sometimes overwhelming. This is especially true with a tkr (total knee replacement). With all the exercises, lack of sleep, and hard work involved, it is too easy to get caught up in our individual situation. We must focus on the positive and start finding inspiration during recuperation.

    It’s always informative reading through comments posted throughout this site. There seems to be an underlying theme found in most of the posts. That theme is inspiration. Most people find it from some source or manner. It all varies with the individual.

    So…it brought some memories of how inspiration played a key role in my life while recuperating from my car accident. Here’s my story that I hope you enjoy…

    I was in a body cast, visiting the doctor monthly. The doctor’s appointment was the only time I got out other than to walk the block daily. One time, after much pressure, I went on a date as a diversion. If you think dating is uncomfortable in everyday life, try doing it in a body cast. Ha!

    Anyways, I was back at home all wrapped up in myself and my current situation. I needed hope. I needed to know that more existed than my continual, miniscule steps toward learning how to independently walk again.

    One night I turned on the television and there was Jacques Cousteau. Back then (the 70’s) he had an hour-long show on Thursday nights. It was known as the “Undersea World of Jacques Cousteau”.

    Each episode focused on introducing us to one ocean-dwelling marine species. Suddenly, my perspective changed. It gave me something to look forward to. What was I going to learn next?

    Here I was one single individual (a small speck on the earth’s surface) learning about an entire species. I was also learning how that same species was under attack by human encroachment. I saw the marvel of lobsters walking single file over the ocean’s surface by using telepathic communication.

    At the end of the episode we heard about how the lobster industry hones in on, and disrupts, this natural process. It is prime commercial lobstering time.

    I learned about the wonderful, peaceful manatees and how they are affectionately known as the “gentle giants”. They were a sight to behold. At the end of the episode we learned about how boat propellers were damaging/killing them.

    I remember an episode about killer whales. We learned about these beautiful wonders, their intelligence, communication skills, and other magnificent insight only he was capable of presenting so compellingly.

    Then, he started discussing these mammals being kept in captivity. Cousteau emphasized how it was only a matter of time before these majestic creatures rebelled. Have you seen the movie Black Fish? Case closed.

    Every episode featured the Calypso, his research vessel. The Calypso was a converted WWII mine sweeper. After my recuperation process ended, I became a proud member of the “Friends of Calypso”, a group of supporters who kept the Calypso operating.

    I hung my Calypso flag proudly on my wall alongside my welcome letter, progress updates, current journey news, research projects, and other paraphernalia. It was a continual source of inspiration.

    In conclusion, be sure to find something that takes you outside of yourself. Be inspired. It will improve your motivation, outlook on life, and enhance your body’s healing capabilities.

    Hope this helps others going through the same thing. Find interesting? Kindly share…

    For those wanting more information about the Cousteau Society, here is a link to their website:
    Cousteau Society

    Find interesting? Kindly share…Thanks!

    AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

    This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physical conditions for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.








    TKR Leg Straightening Exercises That Make a Difference

    Hi everyone. I’ve been receiving numerous emails about tkr leg straightening exercises. It seems that an update to a previously popular article is in order. I am leaving the original comments intact so you can gain further insight.

    Leg straightening was of particular interest to me during my initial tkr recuperation stages. I had to spend extra time working on this area to make my leg (knee) lie flat on any surface. You are probably the same way.

    Hope the following information is useful to you..

    Search online and you will notice that there have been a number of blog posts written about ways to straighten your leg after undergoing a total knee replacement. I have used them and they work well. Even though the basic exercise maneuver and format is there, it is always interesting to see these exercises from a different perspective. All variations can be individualized to suit individual needs.

    I love sharing insight from my readers. In this instance, it is from Monique, one of my favorite contributors who just underwent a tkr herself. Her helpful suggestions put a different spin on some traditional leg straightening exercises to do during the tkr recuperation process. I thought her variations would be helpful to share with everyone. I have tested each maneuver and can attest to its legitimacy. They are as follows, in her words:

    1) Lie on the bed and extend the TKR leg and place the heel on a rolled up towel so that the leg is slanted, not touching the bed. Then take a phone book, open it in half and place it across the knee. Stay in position for about 4 minutes. (I had to work up to this because it hurt when I first began doing this.)

    2) Another exercise for straightening the leg…Lie face down on bed and let your leg hang over the edge of the bed about at the knee. Add a weight on the ankle of the TKR knee. I put the strap of my purse on my ankle and let the bag hang down. Stay in position for about 4 minutes or as long as your can stand it.

    I like the idea of the phone book as a weight in exercise #1. And, the idea of using a purse strap in exercise #2 is very ingenious, in my opinion. 🙂

    Thanks, Monique. I’m sure others will enjoy these exercises as well. Well, maybe not enjoy them (due to pain, you know..), but will get great use out of them. 🙂

    Hope this helps others going through the same thing.

    Find interesting? Kindly share…Thanks!
    AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

    The site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 30+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.