Be Proud Of Your Scars

Hi everyone. How do you view scars? A few of you have asked me how do I deal with my tkr scar? The scar left behind is quite large and very noticeable. Well, your viewpoint determines whether scars are a badge of honor or an embarrassment. I say you need to be proud of your scars. Here’s more…

NOTE: It was wonderful to see what Princess Eugenia did about showing her scoliosis scar. Apparently, she had her wedding dress designer make it a point to display her scar, not hide it. She wanted to show others that scars are nothing to be ashamed of. Good for her…:) October 2018.

Obviously, scars can be the result of quite a few things. This article talks about the physical appearance of scars upon one’s body. These may have occurred due to surgeries, medical procedures, life’s experiences, or other such occurrences.

According to the cosmetic industry, scars are considered yet another area of imperfection. This industry is attempting to lead us to believe that scars are something to be ashamed of. Scars are being promoted as taking away from our natural beauty, according to this powerful, multi-billion dollar industry.

Turn on the television, visit social media sites, or pick up a magazine and you will find ads about scar-eliminating products. The ad will likely show a person explaining the dramatic/negative effects a 1/4-1/2″ scar has upon them. The totally debilitating scar is the main concern of one’s existence, according to this ad. The ads can be very convincing. I say “spare me”.

Or, go to the store and peruse the shelves filled with products claiming cosmetic improvements to one’s appearance. It’s mind-boggling. It’s bad enough that the cosmetic field has us convinced that our natural state is improper, but to try to convince us that scars are a sign of deficiency? Come on.

My viewpoint? Scars are a sign that one has encountered a battle and lived to talk about it. My total knee replacement scar is about 10″ long. Yours is probably about the same.

My philosophy? Add it to the collection. The outside of my thigh has another 10″ scar that is 40 years old. And, there are others. They all have a story behind them. 🙂

Scars are not something to be ashamed of, or hidden from view. Weather permitting, I wear shorts and my scars show. If someone doesn’t like seeing them, they don’t have to look.

Moral of story:
Be proud of your scars and treat them like a trophy. Show them off when you can. Talk about them in a comfortable manner with others. Share the experience behind them. Not everyone can regale your tales like you can. 🙂

When you notice someone staring at your scar (and it will happen), wait for them to say something. Over the years, my experience shows most will not. Those who do, do so out of true concern. Just answer questions honestly. You have nothing to be embarrassed about.

Be free to say to whoever will listen… “Want to see my scar?” Do it with enthusiasm and proudness. Then, show it off while gazing fondly at it. (You may get some strange looks when you do this, though. 🙂 )

Some scars are the result of carelessness or errors on one’s part. An example of this is using power tools incorrectly, or improper use of fireworks. Now, I would think those scars would need a little more story embellishment.

Scars are a sign of survival. Don’t let anyone tell you otherwise. The only alternative to survival is death. You choose.

End of my “soap opera speech” for the day. Hope this helps others going through the same thing. 🙂

Find interesting? Kindly share…Thanks!

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.


How To Naturally Heal TKR Scars With Food

Hi everyone. Scars seem to be a common subject among you, my favorite readers. I just got done reading an interesting article on how to best heal scars the natural way. Knowing what a doozy I have (it’s about 10 inches..I haven’t measured it), I thought it would be fun to write a post about how foods can be used to naturally heal a tkr scar.

Personally, I like my tkr scar. It’s healed just fine. Nine years after my total knee replacement surgery, it has blended in well. In part, I believe, is the fact I eat a lot of fresh fruits and vegetables. Food is my healing agent.

Below is some information that provides insight into my reasoning. My data comes from personal experience as well as backup content from the American Dietetic Association. Here goes….

Vitamins that can benefit scar healing are high in antioxidants. The antioxidants are essential for healing of wounds/scars. These include Vitamins C, E and A. I’ll talk about Vitamin C now, for no particular reason other than it’s fresh on my mind. Here goes…

Vitamin C is found in more vegetables than you probably imagine. It is found in dark leafy vegetables such as spinach, mustard greens, collard greens and various dark-colored lettuces (like red leaf). The vitamin is also found in winter squash, green peppers, broccoli, brussel sprouts (or mini-cabbages as some know them) and cabbage varieties.

If you have a sweet tooth (which fruit can satisfy), you’re in luck. Vitamin C is found in berries such as raspberries, blackberries, strawberries, marionberries, blueberries and huckleberries. Citrus fruits like oranges, grapefruit, lemons and limes are also rich in the vitamin.

Mango, watermelon and pineapples are other sources that contain ample amounts to help in skin healing. Snacking on a mango..oohlala! Mixing some fresh fruit into plain yogurt is another option…:)

So you know, I’m talking about the fresh varieties of fruits and vegetables. Personally, I’m not a fan of canned foods, but they do come in handy. One occasion is using them as my minestrone soup base when ripe fresh ones are unavailable.

It’s also nice to have some canned food on hand for emergency power outages or the like. For everyday/consistent eating, though…no. Nothing beats a freshly steamed pot of veggies and serving of protein.

Well, hope this helps others going through the same thing. Take action to start naturally healing any total knee replacement scars. Remember… You are what you eat.

Find interesting? I surely hope so. Kindly share whenever possible…

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

The site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 30+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.







Eleven Months After A Total Knee Replacement

Sharing personal insight into eleven months after a total knee replacement.

Hi my favorite readers! It is that time of the month again…time for my monthly update. As of today’s date, I am eleven months after a  total knee replacement. Here are some of the results:

  • My scar is beautifully healed. Only the top 1.5″ above my knee is discolored. I like my scar and view it as a trophy.  🙂 I kept it clean throughout the healing process.
  • My bionic knee still has flexibility issues. However, I expect that and work on it regularly. My total knee replacement was not your typical one. It was trauma related, so needs a longer recuperation process. Riding an upright bicycle is the key, I have found. The flexibility is better than before my surgery, though. I can get on the exercise bike much easier than previously.
  • My knee is still swollen, only less than last month. Still, the swelling increases after prolonged periods of standing or exercising. No complaints for it being eleven months after a total knee replacement.
  • My knee has clicked a couple of times this period. It’s more of a curiosity than concern, however.
  • My range of motion has increased without the accompanying pain.
  • I can walk more than a city block without pain. This was not so before my total knee replacement.
  • I can ride my upright exercise bike at a lower seat level and greater tension with much more ease than previously. The pain level has diminished, also. (I probably shouldn’t say this because Murphy’s Law follows me around, you know).
  • The damaged nerve, caused by my former bone spur, results in painful sleeping. Sometimes, it bothers me during the day.
  • I can sit comfortably in a chair. This was not possible for months after my tkr.
  • The overall knee pain has diminished.
  • I can perform various yoga, belly dancing, Tai Chi, and stretching poses without much pain. This was not true prior to my tkr surgery.
  • Stairs are still a pain in the butt. Or..knee, back, leg, and pride pain.

Actually, not much else is different from my tenth month update. The biggest difference is the decrease in swelling and overall level of pain.

I have taken care of pain in my nonsurgical leg by using my tkr leg more.

Hope this helps others going through the exciting recuperation from a total knee replacement.

Find interesting? Kindly share…Thanks!

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