8 Factors Affecting Air Quality and Breathing

Hi everyone. Some of you are noticing difficulties breathing and have asked me about my situation. Other than what I have previously written about, I have come up with 8 factors affecting air quality and breathing that can easily be passed along. So, from first-hand experience….

Smoking/vaping – anything associated with nicotine. I don’t care how vaping is marketed, it’s nicotine carried via vapors. Symptoms may not be as quickly noticeable as tobacco smoking, but it still pollutes the air.

Tobacco. My body is super-sensitive to tobacco in any form. Whether it be second-hand smoke from cigarettes or cigars, smokey rooms, breathing someone’s tobacco breath, or any similar situation – I react.

Body odor. No description needed. Please.. soap, water, and effort is all it takes.

Bad breath. No description needed on how this affects air quality and breathing.

Cologne/body fragrances. Au naturale has my vote. I hope there’s not a commercial fragrance with that title.

Cleaning agents. Many commercially-prepared agents affect air quality. Start using natural sources like bleach, baking soda, and/or vinegar for results at a fraction of the cost. It’s amazing how a little baking soda on a wet cloth can scrub away grime.

Scented candles. Some more than others affect air quality and breathing.

Dust. Not everyone is sensitive to dust. I am. I once ended up with horrendous symptoms by attempting to sleep in a room full of dusty 40-year old collectibles.

My guests did not understand my breathlessness, migraine, nausea, vomiting, and sluggishness. I never stayed there again.

Well, I think that’s enough for now. Air quality does affect breathing, to some extent. Depending upon your individual situation, you may have it better or worse.

Remember, there are many more reasons that your breathing may be negatively affected. I recommend performing a Google search for health information on this topic, if interested.

Hope this helps others going through the same thing.

Find interesting? Kindly share….Thanks!

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.







Breathing Is A Gift: Treasure It

Hi everyone. Do you every think that breathing is a gift? It is so easy to take it for granted when all is going well. Here is a real-life story to provide more insight into why you need to treasure it.

As many of you already know, I fractured my C-1 (first cervical vertebrae) in 1975. One of the after effects is breathing difficulties. Shortness of breath is a daily occurrence for me ever since. There are many trigger points that enhance its impact.

Improper pillow. You probably see commercials about the importance of having a comfortable pillow. Have you ever noticed how difficult it is to buy a good-fitting, comfortable pillow? I have. The process is termed..PITA. If you don’t know what that stands for, just …as the saying goes…GOOGLE it.

Pillows can seem so worthwhile in the market, while feeling them up. It’s only when getting home and actually using them that the truth comes out. Either too full, too flat, too fluffy, or too cumbersome.

The wrong pillow affects my breathing. It may affect yours, as well. This occurs when the vertebrae are misaligned. Pain shoots everywhere from my head to my toes. (Especially my neck.) A misaligned neck makes breathing very difficult. It hinders sleeping, also. Not good….

There are many nights when sleeping on folded towels is the solution. Or, simply laying flat. Flatness provides instantaneous relief. Nice…

Mattress. A good mattress makes all the difference, also. Pillow-top versions do not feign well with spinal alignment. Some consider these versions “romantic”, not me. Give me a firm mattress any day and twice on Sunday.

Regularly rotating and turning the mattress will help even out mattress wear-and-tear. A mattress that needs rotating will cause spinal misalignment – hence, shortness of breath.

Poor posture. This is common sense, but must be mentioned. The older I have gotten, the more I realize not everyone has common sense. Shortness of breath occurs more often when my neck is misaligned.

Poor diet. After 40+ years of living with daily shortness of breath, I know for a fact that processed foods, in particular, hinder my breathing. It may be the preservatives, excess sugar/fat/additives, or handling. Whatever it is, I minimize my usage of these “foods”.

Stress. Isn’t stress the cause of many health problems? You bet it is. Whatever shape or form it takes, excess stress hinders breathing. I would think we all share that dilemma. It’s only when realizing it that we can change it. Sometimes it is much easier said than done.

OK…I think that’s enough for now. You may be wondering why I choose to write about breathing on a blog that mainly discusses total knee replacement concerns. It is because I have been experiencing increased bouts of shortness of breath lately. I blame it on the pillow. It also happened during my tkr recuperation.

Hope this helps others going through the same thing.

MORAL OF STORY: Never take your breathing for granted. There are those who would give almost anything for the delight of effortless breathing. Breathing is a gift…Treasure it.

Find interesting? Kindly share it….

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.

Shortness of Breath As A Symptom

Hello everyone. It’s always interesting to read about taking care of your health and what the “experts” say. Sometimes it can bring on more questions than answers, though. The topic I will discuss here involves having shortness of breath as a “symptom”.

Start reading about heart disease and related heart problems. A common indication is listed as having shortness of breath. Articles recommend contacting your doctor when you find breathing difficult.

Many times, shortness of breath can signify more serious health conditions. This is according to studies by the American Heart Association, National Institutes of Health and others.

My question is, what if a person has a fractured C-1 included in their medical history? (A fractured C-1 is a fracture of the first cervical vertebrae. The cervical area is located in your neck. In layman terms, a fractured C-1 means you “broke your neck”. )

FYI: When I discuss the topic, I use the wording C-1 since the “broken neck” phrase is creepy. Anyways.. A fractured C-1 usually results in breathing difficulties.

Here is my question: What if a person lives with breathing difficulties for the majority of their live? My cervical fracture, for instance, happened 40+ years ago.

How is one supposed to tell whether it is a symptom of heart disease or just a part of life? This is truly perplexing to me. I certainly am not running to the doctor every time I have shortness of breath. I’d keep the profession in business.

My shortness of breath occurs daily. To some extent, it exists.

I am just pondering here. Anyone have any answers they would like to share?

Find interesting? Kindly share..







Overdoing It: Are You Doing This?

Learn how to identify overdoing it.

Hi my favorite readers! I was just thinking about writing a post about how to tell when you are overdoing it, when a rescue team was called to the hot tub. It turns out a lady overheated while sitting in the tub. She didn’t realize she was overdoing it. I don’t know how it turned out, but hopefully she is home staying cool.

So..how do you know when you are overdoing it? When first recuperating from a total knee replacement, knee swelling and warmness are common symptoms. So is pain. So is pain. (The double entry is purposeful.)

I remember asking my physical therapist for an answer. She mentioned that if there was pain for more than two hours after exercise, it signified overdoing it. OK. More than one source confirms this two-hour period for being a gauge. So, I’ll buy that.

Now…how about the times not affecting a tkr, or total knee replacement? Like when one is sitting in a hot tub, wet or dry sauna, swimming or exercising in the gym? What about pregnant woman, those with diabetes, etc.? Hotter temperatures can easily lead to heat exhaustion or heat strokes without any physical exertion involved.

I had someone tell me to put a cold towel on my head while sitting in a sauna to withstand hot temperatures for longer periods of time. I can see how a cold head might help out. But, my question is…how can you tell when you’re overdoing it? If your head is cold, does that mean the rest of your body isn’t getting overheated? How can it? What if the nerves in someone’s cervical area, which send signals from your neck to your body are severed, or damaged, so proper transmission is hindered?

Anybody have an answer?

Anyways…overdoing can result from too much exercise, too much heat, too much food, too much anything..to be truthful. When doing research into overdoing it, I came up with a list of signals to look out for. This applies to the general population who do not have any predisposed conditions, like a fractured C-1.

Loss of appetite
Visual field impairment
Sleep disorders
Mood disorders like irritability..(yeah, I’ll blame it on that..:) )
Heart rate fluctuations like murmurs
Excessive fatigue
Incessant sweating or lack of any sweating
Shortness of breath, dizziness or breathing difficulties
Difficulties focusing and concentrating
Muscle cramps and spasms
Chest pains
Nausea and vomiting

It is imperative that you know your body so you can more easily notice when things aren’t feeling or going correctly. At least, that’s what I’m told.

Overdoing it is a foreign field to me, since I’ve had a fractured C-1. Personally, I don’t realize I’m overdoing it until I cannot function properly. That is why I keep track of my pulse, time spent engaged in activities and other external signals. Even those fail sometimes.

Whenever in doubt about any situation, I always place safety first. I would much rather be a “wimp” than someone in the emergency room.

Hope this helps others going through the same thing. Find interesting? Kindly share…..Thanks!

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns. The site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 30+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.








Playing A Musical Instrument After A TKR

After receiving an email from one of my readers regarding her musical skills and abilities, I was reminded about an event that occurred after having my total knee replacement surgery.

Background History : Music has been a part of my life since I was a tiny tot in second grade. I started playing the flutophone (also known as a recorder) in a band. It taught me how to read music and develop the other technicalities involved in playing a musical instrument.

Then, in fourth grade, I got my “real” flute. Nice. End of background history.

Back to the Future:
Anyways, about a month after my tkr, I picked up my flute. I like to practice and hear myself. 🙂
I was very out of breath and could not play for a couple of minutes without getting light headed and very, very tired. That was totally unusual for me. Normally, I can play for hours without any concerns like this.

Not only was I frustrated, I was very curious as to this change of events. In fact, I was more curious than any other emotion. I know that the anethesia given to me for my total knee replacement had made me VERY ill for days. So, I am wondering if the anesthesia after effects were still hanging around. ?

It took about three months after my tkr for me to be able to play my flute and not be affected by my decreased lung capacity.

I thought this is an interesting side note to write about. I never in my wildest dreams thought about not being able to play my flute after surgery. Hmm…

Hope this blog post helps any other musicians playing an instrument.