Living With Severe Neuropathy & a TKR

Hi everyone! I have been receiving numerous inquiries regarding sciatica, nerve pain, and other pains associated with a tkr or total knee replacment. The timing is ideal since I have been experiencing high levels of neuropathy pain. Here’s the scoop that I trust will provide further insight…

As I have written about in other posts that prior to my tkr, bone spurs were digging into my nerves. They were severing my nerves. (The nerves are located alongside the lateral portion of my knee.)

Prior to my tkr, I had to readjust my entire body in order to compensate for this extreme pain.

What is interesting is that almost 10 years post-tkr, this neuropathy pain can be excruciating at times. I know that my situation could be much worse, but believe it
is worthy of sharing with you.

The level of discomfort is simply noticeable and potentially hindering. I do not know when it will happen. It is unpredictable.

There are times when the neuropathy leads to my entire tkr leg tingling. Sometimes there is pain, other times there is not. It is the strangest feeling.

Right now, I am sitting at a computer using proper ergonomics, and I feel my lower leg tingling all the way down to the ends of my toes. I straighten my leg and the tingling diminishes. Other times I straighten my leg and the tingling continues.

I always like to pay particular attention to activities happening when the pain and/or tingling occur. I do notice that the neuropathy pain occurs when lifting any amount of weight. Even carrying some grocery bags does this.

It sometimes happens when I am swimming. It can happen when standing for more than 5-10 minutes. These are just some situations that pop into my mind as I am writing this article.

How do I ease the pain? I try my best to find stress-reducing body positions. Some work one time and not another. I lightly massage the area. This provides temporary relief, usually.

There are several yoga stretches that help, like the pyramid pose. Touching toes, downward-facing dog, and camel pose all provide relief, also.

And: Elevating my leg works some times, not all the time. In short, my remedies provide unpredictable results. I take aspirin, but dread popping pills for a number of reasons.

Hope this helps others going through the same thing. Find interesting? Kindly share with others who may benefit. Thank you!

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.






TKR Nerve Damage: Some Helpful Insight

Hi everyone. Many of you have been contacting me about dealing with tkr nerve damage, so thought I would pitch in. My feedback is based on personal experience. As I have mentioned before, over the years my body developed very noticeable bone spurs on each side of my left knee. This knee was finally replaced in my total knee replacement surgery.

The bone spurs looked like quite noticeable hooks. Picture a hook that holds towels, chains, etc and you get the idea. These hooks dug into my nerves every time I moved. They severed the nerves, causing them to severely shred. Technically speaking, this is known as severe neuropathy. Anyways, here some insight about my tkr nerve damage….

There are extended times when the pain is either completely unnoticeable or slightly uncomfortable. When I swim, the pain is almost nonexistent – most of the time. In fact, I had gone for so long without any nerve damage pain, I forgot that the possibility was there.

Then, I attended a workout known as Body Pump. The workout can be adjusted to individual preferences. I chose to use very light weights of five pounds.

The workout consists of squats, pushups, planks, arm lifts, and other maneuvers that result in a whole-body set. Motions go from slow to fast-paced. It is a versatile workout program. Movements can be modified to suit individual needs.

My squats were very shallow. Part of that was due to having decreased tkr mobility. I have a 93-degree bend in my knee. I did wall push-ups so I didn’t have to get onto the floor for the standard version. No problem. None of the arm maneuvers were a concern. I felt very good after the workout.

The next day was another story. My nerves were sending loud and clear messages. It is now a month afterwards, and I still have the remnants of overdoing it. I know it could be much worse, but it is an annoyance.

I hope this helps others going through the same thing involving tkr nerve damage. I must reiterate, the nerve damage is not caused by the total knee replacement surgery. My tkr did not fix the neuropathy, either.

Find interesting? Kindly share….

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

The site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 30+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.






Seven Year Post TKR Update

Hi everyone! It has already been seven years since my tkr surgery. I thought it would be fun to share what is going on now to help others going through the same thing at this stage of post-tkr surgery. So, here goes…

* Knee swelling is still common after walking or standing for extended periods of time. I simply elevate the leg afterwards. If the swelling and pain are intense, I may apply ice. Usually I do not need to. I know many of you express concerns about swelling months or a year after a tkr, well it still happens…

* My flexibility is about 95. As I have stated before, that is where it was prior to my tkr. I am not concerned about this. I still do exercises, though, to keep my knee as flexible as possible.

* My tkr leg lies flat on the surface without any problem. What I am trying to say is…There is no space underneath, as during the initial stages of recuperation.

* Stairs are doable, but not a pretty picture when undertaken. If anyone is around, I simply ask them to conquer the steps first. If there was a race between a sloth and I, the sloth would likely win. Still..no complaints here.

* My knee still gets hot, or very warm to the touch, after overdoing it. It just takes time to cool down. I may ice it or not. It’s no biggie.

* The neuropathy left behind from my bone spur is there. Sometimes it is very painful, other times it is mild. Still other times it results in a tingling sensation that encompasses my entire leg. Elevating my leg and taking a couple AC & Cs will help. So will a gentle massage.

* My tkr will click every now and then. It’s bizarre when it happens while swimming. The clicking is no concern for me. It really does not happen that often.

* Kneeling is doable, but only with cushions underneath. It is not a common occurrence. When it does happen, I only kneel to a 95 degree angle. Anything more is too painful and uncomfortable. I don’t like pain.

* I can weave in and out of pedestrian traffic in an enviable fashion. It’s a gift and great blessing when so many people hem and haw their way around. 🙂

Well, I guess that is it for now. The tkr recuperation process is so difficult, the insomnia period so long, but the final result is so worth it..in my opinion.

As I said in the beginning, I hope this information has helped many of you going through the same situation. Thank you for taking the time to read.

If you find this information interesting, kindly share it with others. Thanks!

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns. The site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 30+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.