Carrying Things Upstairs After A TKR

Sharing personal insight into carrying things upstairs after a tkr – total knee replacement.

Hi everyone. It’s always nice to hear from you. Recently, I have received many inquiries about carrying things upstairs after a tkr – total knee replacement. Throughout my tkr recuperation I looked for ways to make climbing stairs easier and more manageable. Here is my personal insight worth sharing on my tkr blog…

Upon entering the house, I place all bags onto the stair’s base level (floor). I then walk up one stair at a time. I reach down and pick up the bags with one hand, grab onto the rail with my other hand, then swing the bags (no..there’s no eggs involved) onto the stair 2-3 higher.

This tkr blogger repeats this process until I reach the entry door.

I  discovered this process after numerous times of carrying all the bags in both hands while ascending the staircase. This was difficult. The bags seemed heavy. Then when I’d get to the top of the tkr stairs (SEO phrase), I’d be sweaty and out of breath. Plus, my language would not have made my mother proud. 🙁

Where’s Popeye? He could do anything. I bet he would make carrying things upstairs after a tkr seem like a breeze.  🙂

Hope this helps anyone else going through the same thing.

Find interesting and helpful? Kindly share…

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout the pre-op, recuperation and beyond stages. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physical concerns.

This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.

Seven Year Post TKR Update

Hi everyone! It has already been seven years since my tkr surgery. I thought it would be fun to share what is going on now to help others going through the same thing at this stage of post-tkr surgery. So, here goes…

* Knee swelling is still common after walking or standing for extended periods of time. I simply elevate the leg afterwards. If the swelling and pain are intense, I may apply ice. Usually I do not need to. I know many of you express concerns about swelling months or a year after a tkr, well it still happens…

* My flexibility is about 95. As I have stated before, that is where it was prior to my tkr. I am not concerned about this. I still do exercises, though, to keep my knee as flexible as possible.

* My tkr leg lies flat on the surface without any problem. What I am trying to say is…There is no space underneath, as during the initial stages of recuperation.

* Stairs are doable, but not a pretty picture when undertaken. If anyone is around, I simply ask them to conquer the steps first. If there was a race between a sloth and I, the sloth would likely win. Still..no complaints here.

* My knee still gets hot, or very warm to the touch, after overdoing it. It just takes time to cool down. I may ice it or not. It’s no biggie.

* The neuropathy left behind from my bone spur is there. Sometimes it is very painful, other times it is mild. Still other times it results in a tingling sensation that encompasses my entire leg. Elevating my leg and taking a couple AC & Cs will help. So will a gentle massage.

* My tkr will click every now and then. It’s bizarre when it happens while swimming. The clicking is no concern for me. It really does not happen that often.

* Kneeling is doable, but only with cushions underneath. It is not a common occurrence. When it does happen, I only kneel to a 95 degree angle. Anything more is too painful and uncomfortable. I don’t like pain.

* I can weave in and out of pedestrian traffic in an enviable fashion. It’s a gift and great blessing when so many people hem and haw their way around. 🙂

Well, I guess that is it for now. The tkr recuperation process is so difficult, the insomnia period so long, but the final result is so worth it..in my opinion.

As I said in the beginning, I hope this information has helped many of you going through the same situation. Thank you for taking the time to read.

If you find this information interesting, kindly share it with others. Thanks!

AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns. The site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 30+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.






Lifting Furniture After A TKR

Hi my favorite readers!

This is a reprint of a popular article/post of mine. I’m reprinting it due to receiving numerous requests regarding the subject matter. Enjoy!

I haven’t been on here for a while since I’ve been moving. While moving I received insight into how lifting furniture affects my tkr. I thought I’d share….

During a tkr recuperation, we all know not to lift heavy items. I was curious to see how that applied to 2.5 years post tkr. After all, I’m done with the recuperation process. Well, not lifting heavy items still applies. Don’t get me wrong, there was no way I was going to attempt lifting an item that was out of my comfort zone as part of my move. Other items, such as a solid wood night stand, were doable.

First, I received pain along the inner portion of my tkr. It was unusual since I haven’t had pain in that area before. I stopped moving as soon as the pain started. It was a deep, almost throbbing, type of pain. The pain was enough for me to take an aspirin. (Aspirin, or white willow bark are my drugs of choice.)

Secondly, my entire upper knee began to hurt. It wasn’t a throbbing pain, but more like a sharp, deep pain. It was as if my body weight was being forced onto my tkr and my tkr didn’t like the impact. Strange..I knew if I continued that I may cause harm. So, I stopped.

I needed to elevate and ice my leg after just a few hours of maneuvering furniture from one flight of stairs to another, going downstairs. That reminds me…

Here’s a great tip to help those having to move from an upper level to ground level – use the stairs as a slide. It was quite doable to maneuver the furniture in a manner that allowed it to slide. I just held on to the end closest to me to prevent any wall damage. It took awhile sometimes, but I didn’t mind. I found this sliding maneuver to work well as opposed to lifting items and carrying them downstairs.

If I had to move from a ground level to upper level, no way in blazes I would carry furniture up the stairs. My knees would go on strike for better pay. And, the sliding maneuver …well, it probably would work. I’m just too lazy to find out.

Go slow and be safe. Move in the morning hours before temps heat up. Drink plenty of cold water. At the end of the venture, a cold brewski may help. 🙂 (Only if you’re not taking any meds…please!)

Hope this helps others going through the same thing.

Find interesting? Kindly share…Thanks!






Stairs & A TKR…19 Months Post-Op

The past few days I have needed to climb up and down stairs that have a wider than 6” depth. (6” is the depth of a typical step or stair).What an experience.

The second day I was totally pooped. I was so tired, in fact, that I fell asleep during some of the Detroit Red Wings’ game against the St. Louis Blues in Sweden. That’s a first. It was kind of funny, actually, because when I started to snooze the Wings were up by two. No worries. When I woke up, they were losing. Bummer.

Anyways, back to my knee. It has been swollen for the past two days. My ankles are swollen, also. The first day sleeping was tough due to my tkr leg hurting so much. It was similar to how it was back when I was still stretching out my hamstrings. My tkr leg was having difficulty stretching out. Ouch..

The nerve on the outside of my tkr leg has been reminding me that it’s there, also. It usually is painful to just stand up. I have to wait a few seconds to get everything in place prior to moving. (I just re-read that sentence and ….that would make a good YouTube video).

I’m staying in an older house now, while watching a cute labrador, and my mind views it as interesting to see how these older houses are built as compared to the newer ones. My body doesn’t think it’s too interesting, though.

It could be much worse. So, for now, I’ll just sound like life is tough when it really isn’t. Just an update about the thrills of stairs and a tkr….19 months post op.