7 Ways to Speed Up Your Knee Replacement Recuperation

Hi my favorite readers. Many of you have approached me recently inquiring about ways to make the tkr recuperation easier. There is no simple approach, unfortunately. Sharing one of my more popular posts regarding this topic may help you. Good luck!

Having a total knee replacement surgery is only part of the process. Always remember that. How you deal with the recuperation to actually use your new knee is another part. It, actually, is the hardest part. Only you can determine the extent of your success.

  • Here are some ways I have noticed an improvement in my total knee replacement recuperation. My knee is getting better every day because of them. They may work for you. Here goes…

    * Every hour on the hour, get up and walk around. Even if it is for only a couple of minutes. You need to stand up and get your blood flowing. Your level of recuperation (and physical therapist) will determine whether you use a walking aide or not.

  • *Do as much as you can for yourself. Lower your reliance on others when you can easily do it yourself. You will only be hurting yourself.
  • *Know that it will be painful. You cannot get around having pain after a major surgery. Bummer.

    *Take a pain med prior to your exercise. I find that ½ hour beforehand works best for me. This will help make your exercise regimen go easier. Of course, your pain meds will decrease as time goes on and your level of recuperation increases. The sooner the better, I say.

    *Set a goal for your knee flexibility. Find a ‘hash mark’ on the floor that you want to stretch your foot to. Lift your leg farther than an earlier attempt. Your physical therapist can help with this.

    *Keep icing. After every exercise bout, ice your knee area. The best is a simple ice pack. Or, frozen peas and carrots work well.:)

    *Elevate. Keep your leg elevated when not exercising. This helps the healing.

    Recuperating from a total knee replacement takes work, time and effort. Stay with it and you will only benefit. Remember to check back here often to realize that you are not alone.

    Find interesting? Kindly share…

    AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

    This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.







    Walking Sticks and A TKR

    Hi everyone. Recently, I have heard quite a bit about how helpful walking sticks were for exercise purposes. Some of you have asked me about them, also. So, I have used them on some of my daily walks. They were OK, but not something I would want to use regularly. They did come in handy on another event, though…

    Scenario:
    It was during a hike. The expedition was originally presented to me as a 5-mile round-trip beach walk. No problem, I thought. Hah!! It turned into a 8-9 mile round-trip walk in the woods, going through old growth forests. (I think the technical term is backwoods.)

    One of my hiking companions had a couple of walking sticks. She was praising the benefits of the sticks and swore she wouldn’t go hiking without them. Her ankles were giving her problems. Plus, she mentioned how the sticks helped her balance.

    When I asked her how they worked, she gave a demonstration. She put the stick down into the ground and it went all the way down to the handle. See…parts of this trail were big time mud traps. It was a hilarious sight, and I burst out laughing. Luckily…she was not hurt and did not fall.

    A while later, another portion of the hike involved going down a muddy trail. When she offered one of her sticks, I took her up on it. I am glad I did. There was no way I could have made it down that decline without the aid of the stick. The stick kept me from falling and definitely game me support.

    Moral: Getting used to the walking stick was the hard part. Once this hurdle is overcome, it really is an asset to have around. It has come in handy on numerous occasions, other than hiking.

    Conclusion:
    So, for anyone interested in using a walking stick after a tkr..I highly recommend it. I’m not getting paid to say this or writing any reviews. This handy device just makes walking and hiking so much easier, especially on questionable terrains.

    Hope this helps others going through the same thing.

    Find interesting? Kindly share…

    AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

    This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.







    How To Lower Your Risks of Falling

    Tips on How to lower your risks of falling

    Hi my favorite readers! While recuperating, and preparing, for a total knee replacement it is important to prepare your living area to help avoid falls. Here are some helpful tips on how to lower your risks of falling. They apply for everyone, not just a total knee replacement person.

    This is also an excerpt from my ebook titled…”Preparing for a Total Knee Replacement”.

    * Remove all loose rugs that do not have a nonstick backing. If possible, duct tape the rugs to the floor – if desired.

    * Remove all loose rugs, period. Sometimes, depending on your balance, crutches and walkers will have a hard time getting around the edges of loose rugs.

    * Remove all cords from the floor. If you don’t remove them, make certain that you can maneuver around them without causing any distress.

    I have known people who didn’t look down while walking and tripped over cords that easily could have been avoided had they watching where they were walking. 

    * Be careful and aware of your surroundings. It is crucial for fall prevention.

    * Watch out for small animals. They have a tendency to run under your feet quickly and without warning.

    * I recommend not having any small animals (considered hazards) around for the first week after surgery. Do your part in fall prevention and total knee replacement instances.

    * Don’t reach for anything above your head.  It is too easy to lose your balance this way.

    * Don’t drink alcohol. If you simply must have it, consume minimal amounts. This is common sense, but it does affect one’s balance.

    * Don’t lean to either side while on your crutches or walker. Keep your body weight evenly positioned. Remember to keep a square, safe reach area around you. Again, you will lose your balance too easily if you don’t.

    It is easy to avoid falling while recuperating from a total knee replacement if you prepare both yourself and home beforehand. Be successful by using these how to tips. All are tried and true.

    Hope this helps others going through the same thing.

    Find interesting? Kindly share…Thanks!

    AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

    This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.






    Places To Donate Orthopedic Shoes

    Hi everyone. The subject of where to donate used orthopedic shoes recently came up. It’s time for an update. Thank you, Robert! Ranging from helping a veteran to cleaning our planet, there are a variety of nonprofits available to assist you. Here are some places to donate orthopedic shoes:

    SOLES4SOULS

    From their website: “Turning shoes and clothes donations into a micro-enterprise model while providing low-income entrepreneurs a way to lift themselves out of poverty.”

    Every shoe you donate to this Nashville-based nonprofit is sold to provide funds for education, housing, and other needs for those living in poverty. One shoe equals one dollar.

    Operated worldwide in partnership with Zappos. Click on the below link to be taken to their website.
    Http://soles4souls.org

    SHOES FOR CREWS

    Taken from their Gripping Blog: ‘Tips and Kicks From Shoes For Crews’
    “Here’s some helpful information about some of the largest shoe donation organizations in the U.S. so you can decide where you’ll be sending your old footwear:”

    Some organizations include Shoeman Water Projects (operating in Kenya, Haiti and South America), Old Word Running (Boulder, CO-based), Donate Your Old Shoes, The Shoe Bank (Dallas, TX-based), and Green Sneakers (run by Crown Ministry Group) – helps reduce landfill by recycling shoes.

    I understand that the Shoe Bank in Dallas, TX has closed since the Gripping Blog post was written. Management is working on new directions.

    For more information about donating your orthopedic shoes, visit:
    http://www.shoesforcrews.com/blog/life-work/where-should-you-donate-your-old-shoes/

    For more information about their company, visit:
    http:www.shoesforcrews.com

    SHOE BANK of CANADA
    The Canadian Shoe Charity

    From their website: “Our mission is to ensure that all Canadians have access to a decent pair of shoes.
    Shoe Bank Canada collects shoes from warehouses of footwear companies and the closets of people like you. We distribute these shoes, free of charge, to people in need across Canada through food banks and other social agencies in conjunction with the Rotary Clubs.”

    This nonprofit collects gently used shoes of all types and sizes – including orthopedic shoes. They make it as convenient as possible for all donors.

    Visit their website or Facebook page for more information.
    http://www.shoebankcanada.com

    https://www.facebook.com/pg/ShoeBankCanada/posts/

    DONATION TOWN
    This is an online donation site that helps you find the appropriate nonprofit places to donate your orthopedic shoes. They even pickup!

    Charities they deal with include: Vietnam Veterans of America, Habitat for Humanity, Human Society, and many more.

    Visit their website for more information:
    http://donationtown.org
    http://donationtown.org/news/donate-shoes.html

    YMCA

    The Y’s mission statement taken from their website: “The YMCA is dedicated to strengthening the foundation of community. It is about the coming together of community spirit.”

    Since every YMCA differs, I am offering this as a recommendation due to my local branch being involved with used shoe donations. There is a collection bin conveniently located by the front entrance.

    Shoes are collected, shipped to the involved nonprofit, and sold. Funds are used to plant trees, start micro-enterprises, and other appropriate ventures.

    Shoe collection bins seem to be rotated among various nonprofits. Shoes have been collected and shipped to overseas nonprofits who in turn provide footwear to those in need.

    I recommend contacting your local YMCA for further information.

    That’s about it for now. The next time you outwear a pair of orthopedic shoes, remember the less fortunate. Stop throwing your shoes out and put them to good use. Someone, somewhere will benefit from your generousity.

    Thank you and Good luck!

    Do you have any more recommendations you want to share with our readers? Feel free to contact me.

    Find interesting? Kindly share…

    AUTHOR NOTE:
    Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

    This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.

    How To Find Motivation to Exercise After A TKR

    Hi everyone. Usually, it is easy to back out of exercising. Many people continually make excuses about why they don’t exercise. However, I want to share some great ways on how to find motivation to exercise after a tkr. Read on…

    Be diligent in doing your exercises while recuperating from your total knee replacement and you will get excited about what used to be difficult when moving your body. Why? You will reap your rewards. Here’s my take on the issue….

    * You will love how thrilling it is to be able to walk without pain.

    * It is great to have what is known as a ‘normal’ walking gait without walking aides.

    * It is fantastic to be able to walk fast enough to get out of breath and work up a sweat. (To some this would be “speed walking”. I like to think of it as walking faster than I did prior to my tkr.)

    * It is wonderful to be able to walk trails, take in the scenery, and smell the air without feeling any joint pain.

    * It is a nice feeling knowing that you are getting the most out of your total knee replacement surgery.

    * It is so welcoming to have clothes fit better. I know, in my case, there were times when my dryer shrunk too many clothes. 😕

    All of these combine to provide motivation in staying with, or starting, an exercise program.

    Hope this helps you get motivated to exercise after your tkr (or any time, for that matter).

    Always remember to be grateful you can walk.

    Find interesting? Kindly share…
    AUTHOR NOTE: Booktoots’ Healing helps total knee replacement patients find support throughout recuperation and beyond. Its mission is for patients to understand they are not alone in their ordeal with either a tkr or other physicality concerns.

    This site is owned and operated by Marie Buckner, a published author and tkr patient who has been living with various physicalities for over 40+ years. She enjoys sharing her experiences to help others going through the same thing.