Finding Writing Inspiration

Hi my favorite readers! Here is some interesting reading I received from Write to Done I thought I’d share with the writers among us who need to find writing inspiration:

It is a guest post from James Chartrand of Men with Pens, known for his sharp-shooting advice to writers

It is all been said. It has been written before. We feel like we are just rehashing the same old story everyone else has written. And inspiration dies like leaves falling from trees in autumn. There are ways to find inspiration again.

Most suggest taking a break, setting down the pen and paper to do other activities for a while. Reading a book is a good way to give our brains a rest. Going for a walk is another; any physical activity boosts creativity.

What if inspiration still does not come? What if you take a break, read a book, get active and still come up blank when you sit down to write? In most cases, all you have to do is look within to find the inspiration you need. Easy? No. Necessary? Yes.

Our mind plays tricks on us all the time. The events we have lived and the experiences we have had create perception issues. We may view our world through fears and self-set messages that fool us into believing lies we find comfortable.

They all think this is silly¦ No one will want to read this. It is not interesting enough, not different enough. I’m boring. I’m not a good writer. I shouldn’t be doing this… I’ll never finish. I never finish anything. I’m wasting my life. Why can’t I come up with something good for once?”

Many of you may recognize some of your fears in these phrases. They are common ones, thoughts that even the best writers get from time to time. We could even say that they are inspired thoughts, negative messages fed by fears that get the best of us. So what do you do? How do you break through the writing mental barriers that hold you back to release the words you once loved? Here are some suggestions…

Simulate a scenario
Think of all the possible outcomes and look at the worst-case scenarios. If you write something and no one likes it, what do you feel might happen? What is the worst consequence you can think of? What is the best consequence, too? What would you do if these consequences occurred?

Consider the likelihood of each outcome as well and weigh the chances of you taking a risk. You may see that by objective thought, your fears aren’t really founded in reality – then take that risk and give it a try.

Make it an experiment and analyze the results. Learn from the outcome you achieve. Did you have a negative outcome? If so, why? What will you do better next time? Did you have a positive result? How does that contradict what you believed? How does it make you feel?

Validate your feelings

We all tend to avoid feelings that make us uncomfortable. We don’t particularly enjoy thinking about what scares us or makes us sad, and we avoid considering why we feel that way. Who knows what we might uncover?

Well, that is the point right there. Who knows what you might discover if you look your fears in the eye and say to yourself, “Okay, I am terrified of rejection.” Understand that it is a part of you. Accept that you have this fear. Then befriend the fear and treat it like a person that needs you to overcome this obstacle. By taking the focus off you and placing it in a third-party perspective, you’ll often find the courage you need to break through.

Confirm your reality

Most of our perceptions of the world are not accurate. Because of this we make huge assumptions about what people think of us (and what they are not telling us). But the truth is that these assumptions are, in most cases, completely false.

A good way to realign our thoughts with a more realistic view is to use confirmation as a fantastic tool. Do you think your work is boring or not good at all? The minute you have that thought, be accountable for taking action. Find an objective person you trust to immediately to tell you the truth.

Do not make assumptions on what other people think. The minute you start to imagine what others believe, seize the moment and ask a trusted person to tell you the truth. Confirm reality and remind yourself of this reality every time the whispered messages start. You will soon begin to eliminate them and feel confident about the truth.

These three tips may seem like a bunch of psychological mumbo-jumbo, but they are actually good ways to break out of negative self-talk that holds you back. That is the key to finding inspiration for writing. Only confidence and freedom lets us truly release our minds go to explore what we can create.

And when you do that, you will find inspiration. You will also have the confidence to write.

About the Author: Need more inspiration to break free and become a better writer? James Chartrand can help you improve your writing skills. Visit his blog at Men with Pens for more advice on writing.
Find interesting? Kindly share…Thanks!

Find interesting? Kindly share…

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Writing Inspiration From a Successful Blogger

Here is an inspirational piece about writing done during an interview with the successful blogger, Liz Strauss. She has developed a strong following through her blog known as the Successful Blog. It’s address is: http://www.successful-blog.com .

I came upon this through my subscription to The “Write to Done” newsletter. It is a newsletter about writing and is an off-shoot of the Zen habits blog. For more information, you can visit …..http://writetodone.com . Or, visit Zen habits.

Enjoy!

When asked for the reasons Liz wrote, she gave the following feedback:

  • I write because I can take ideas from my head and put them where I can see them.
  • I write because I hear the music of language playing and because I love to paint pictures with words.
  • I write because the universe can be expressed with breathtaking elegance and grace.
  • I write because some thoughts deserve precision in how they are expressed.
  • I write because I am a writer. It’s what I know.
  • Writing lets me reach out to people who aren’t here with me.

On how to cultivate ‘voice’, Liz shared this tidbit:

Let me know your humanity. Show your sense of humor.
Inspire me, respect me, make me think, and make me wonder.
Don’t just be conversational, be the voice of a lifelong friend